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Full text of "Aggie life"

LIBRARY 

OF THE 




MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 



SOURCE- 



M, A, C. 
COLLECTION 



.\ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/aggielife34mass 



&. U}JM 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AMHERST; MiLBS., SEPT. 21, 1632. 



YDL. III. Nd. 1. 



«DRINTE-RS,» 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURy\L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We -would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FEUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fi-uits, address. 

Prof, S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS. 



THE imHERST 



C. H, SANDERSOtift CO., 

CASH DEALERS IN 

FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



SyiNHEiisoti k Thompson, 



SH DEALERS m 



DRY AN FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY IBBONS, AND SMALL 
WA 3 OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



Fo: 



rn 



ND CAR! 



D 



rn 



STOK.E. 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS. MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS. LOUNGES. 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 



CARPETS. RUGS, ETC.. ETC. 



All Goods STRICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FIKE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

:KTTBEEIB C3-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



REF^^IRIlSrO JDOlsTB FROIvrFTL"^. 



T, W. SLOAN, 

S y BOS XIX MOW. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 

STEAA\ AND GAS FITTER. 



A Large Stock of Rauges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heating a Specialty. 



AGG 





AMHERST, MASS., SEPTEMBER 21, 1892. 



No. 1 









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;lie Students of the Mass. 
,1 College. 



in- . 
US," 

, 1 



fti^, 



''^ Single copies, 10c. 

.d-class mail matter. 

TOBS : 

;or-in-Chief, 

-less Manager, 

F. S. HOYT, '93, 
C. F. WALKEE, '94, 
T. F. KEITH, '94, 



ioi-b to the Business Manager. 



tViWat., ^^\UTt^S. 



sriaSs. 



will notice a change of 
this issue. More or less 
expressed with the old 
ce the board decided to 
; is hoped will be satisfac- 



le college student ha< re- 
uurijfu nuui sK-a, aiiu snore and mountain-side again 
to take np his duties at the institution of his choice. 
The Editor, too, is once more at his desk fully 
equipped for work. As he gazes meditatively out 
of the sanctum window on the smiling face of 
Nature, it is with feelings too full for utterance that 
he takes up his pen in behalf of the readers of the 
Life. The long vacation has come to an end and 
in the rush and whirl of college life^ where joy and 
sorrow are blended in a manner understood oulv by 
the college man himself, naug-ht but confused mem- 



ories of summer remain. There is something tar 
too serious in the daily routine of work and play to 
admit of idle meditation on pleasures that have past 
and are gone. We have experienced two whole 
months of recreation and have made the most of 
them. Now that the time has come for us to con- 
tinue once more our journey on the road to knowl- 
edge, let us one and all put our best efforts into our 
work, and thus accomplish great good for ourselves 
and for alma mater. 



Not loug since one of our leading agricultural 
papers criticised the Life because there was not more 
matter pertaining to agriculture among its pages. 
It is evident that the editor of the aforesaid paper, 
perhaijs in eommou with others of our readers does 
not understand the purpose and scope of our publi- 
cation. The paper in order to l)e a success and of 
benefit to the college must contain only such mat- 
ter as pertains to the college as a whole and par- 
ticularly to the student-body. While agriculture is 
one of the most important branches taught in the 
curriculum, other departments are well worthy of 
consideration and if we should introduce discussions 
of agricultural questions it would be only fair to 
publish technical articles pertaining to the other de- 
partments of the course. So we are obliged to 
limit ourselves to general items of interest concern- 
ing all the departments, thus keeping our readers 
informed as to the progress of the college as a 
whole. In this way we hope to make the paper of 
real value to students, faculty, alumni and all who 
have interested themselves in the welfare of our 
institution. 



With the opening of another college year there 
has come a change in our corps of instructors. Lieut. 
Cornish, who lins been with the students for the 
past three years, has been orded to the west by the 



• RR'IMTElRS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

"We would inform the friends of tlie college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Pl.Tnts, Shrulis, Flowers and Small Fi'uits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



THE AliflEfiST 



Fo: 



T1 



d 



}m CAR 



D 



rn 



C. H. SANDERSON^ & CO., 

CASH DEALERS IN 

FINE CLOTHING. J 



Hats, Caps, Ui 

FURN 
CASH ROW, 



SylNDEIISO 



DRY AN: 

HOSIERY 
WA 



AMHERST, 



STOR.E. 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES. PILLOWS. S TUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 



WINIXJW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 



CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All Goods STRICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS J 

FOB 

A FINE 

DRESS SHOES, INI 
CONGRESS 

FOOT-BALL SHOES 



HEFA-IKirvTO- 



T, \A 

2 P 



Eraetkal Blarriber, 

STE/Vn AND GAS FITTER. 



A Large Stock of Kanges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heating a Specialty. 



AGO 





AMHERST, MASS., SEPTEMBER -21, 1892. No. 1 



VOL. III. 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, lOo. 



Entered at the Post O*^ ~^ as second-class mail matter. 



BOAJtn 

G. F. CUEJLI 
J. R. PEBRl 
E. C. HOWARD, '93, 
A. E. MELENDY, '93. 
T. S. BACON, '94, 

A. 

Please address all commui 



T) TTOKS : 

.tor-in-Chief, 

less Manager, 

¥. S. HOTT, '93, 
C. F. WALKER, '94, 
T. F. KEITH, '94, 

"> the Business Manager. 



tiu^?t^'\t% V wti^tvitivist., ?^\\n^?.s. 



itonais. 



Readers of the Life will notice a change of 
cover, commencing with this issue. More or less 
dissatistactiou has been expressed with the old 
cover and in consequence the board decided to 
make the change, which it is hoped will be satisfac- 
tory to all. 



September is here. The college student ha» re- 
turned from sea and shore and mountain-side again 
to take up his duties at the institution of his choice. 
The Editor, too, is once more at his desk fully 
equipped for work. As he gazes meditatively out 
of the sanctum window on the smiling face of 
Nature, it is with feelings too full for utterance that 
he takes up his pen in behalf of the readers of the 
Life. The long vacation has come to an end and 
in the rush and whirl of college life^ where joy and 
sorrow are blended in a manner understood only by 
the college man himself, naught but confused mem- 



ories of summer remain. There is something tar 
too serious in the daily routine of work and play to 
admit of idle meditation on pleasures that have past 
and are gone. We have experienced two whole 
months of recreation and have made the most of 
them. Now that the time has come for us to con- 
tinue once more our journey on the road to knowl- 
edge, let us one and all put our best efforts into our 
work, and thus accomplish great good for ourselves 
and for alma mater. 



Not long since one of our leading agricultural 
papers criticised the Life because there was not more 
matter pertaining to agriculture among its pages. 
It is evident that the editor of the aforesaid paper, 
perhaps in common with others of our readers does 
not understand the purpose and scope of our publi- 
cation. The paper in order to be a success and of 
benefit to the college must contain only such mat- 
ter as pertains to the college as a whole and par- 
ticularly to the student-body. While agriculture is 
one of the most important branches taught in the 
curriculum, other departments are well worthy of 
consideration and if we should introduce discussions 
of agricultural questions it would be only fair to 
publish technical articles pertaining to the other de- 
partments of the course. So we are obliged to 
limit ourselves to general items of interest concern- 
ing all the departments, thus keeping our readers 
informed as to the progress of the college as a 
whole. In this way we hope to make the paper of 
real value to students, faculty, alumni and all who 
have interested themselves in the welfare of our 
institution. 



With the opening of another college year there 
has come a change in our corps of instructors. Lieut. 
Cornish, who has been with the students for the 
past three years, has been orded to the west by the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



military authorities at Washington, and Lieut. Dick- 
inson of the 17th Infantry has been detailed as mili- 
tary instructor in his stead. The relations of Lieut. 
Cornish with the students have always been of the 
pleasantest and the military department of the col- 
lege has made marked advances under his instruc- 
tion. While we wish him entire success in his new 
field of labor, it is with feelings of deep regret that 
we bid him farewell. His successor is a native of 
Amherst and was a member of the class of '77, but 
before completing his course here he received an 
appointment to West Point and left to continue his 
studies in a wider field. It is with pleasure that 
the students and townspeople welcome Lieut. Dick- 
inson back to Amherst, and we feel assured that 
the mutual relations of commandant and cadets 
will be as pleasant in the future as thej' have been 
in the past. Let us all, then, heartily co-opei'ate 
with the commandant for the further improvement 
of the battalion ; let us endeavor to place it in the 
position which, as a department of the first agri- 
cultural college of the country, it ought to occupy. 



Occasionally we have criticisms as to the man- 
agement of the Life coming from those who argue 
that the paper does not give sufficient space to the 
alumni. Certainly it will be admitted that if there 
is any one organization more capable than another 
of advancing the welfare of a college, it is its alumni 
association. Why then do we not make this ap- 
parent in the pages of our publication? The rea- 
son is this: We have at present no means of get- 
ting at our alumni. We may be able to ascertain 
the whereabouts of a man in the immediate vicinity 
if he changes his position, but it is very doubtful 
whether one half the changes outside of our own 
state, ever comes to the notice of the Life board. 
In order to publish a man's occupation, the first re- 
quisite is that note of it be forwarded to the paper. 
If this is done all the difficulty is removed and the 
alumni column is gladly enriched vfith its notices. 
The more recent classes realize how the matter 
stands and '92 in particular has adopted a plan 
which, if carried out, must prove a success. The 
class secretary is authorized to keep watch of his 
own class, and to notify the Life of the where- 
abouts of its men from time to time, and to forward 
any changes of location or occupation as soon as 



they are effected. Now if the earlier classes will 
adopt similar measures, or if each alumnus will 
shade his modesty just enough to acquaint us with 
his successive uses in the world, the alumni column 
will be enable to assume the |iosition in the Life 
that it should hold in any college publication. 



Another year with it.s pleasures and pains, its 
hopes and disappointments, has rolled around, and 
once more it is our pleasant duty to welcome an-' 
other class of students to our halls of learning. It 
is not our object to give such words of advice as 
will be given you in your Baccalaureate sermon, 
four years hence, but to bring before you a few 
plain facts about yourselves and ourselves. You 
are now college students, and as such you will take 
a pride in the welfare of the college, both the work 
of our instructors and the doings of the student 
body. The fundamental principle of success in any 
undertaking, is a good start, and now at the very 
outset of your college course, is the time that you 
are to determine whether that start will be such as 
to bring you over tlie tape first, or whether the 
finish will find you straggling along toward the rear 
of the procession. Of course an education is your 
primary object in being here, but education is not 
confined wholly to the work of the test book or 
the lecture room. "A sound mind in a sound 
body" has come to be a standard phrase, and its 
truth is admitted by all ; therefore make yourselves 
as prominent as possible on the athletic field, and 
bring benefit to yourselves and credit to your col- 
lege. But perhaps the best way in which you can 
bring credit to yourselves and at the same time to' 
the institution of which you are a member, is Ijy 
giving your hearty support to the college publica- 
tion. Aggie Life is pre-eminently a student's 
paper, it is published by the students, and through 
its columns you have an ever ready menus of re- 
ceiving and imparting iulbrmation, and above all, 
of receiving in i-eturn that most valuable of all ac- 
quirements, the power of expressing your thought 
in such a manner as to interest your readers, and 
present to them some new thought. It is your 
paper, and before you realize it, the duty of carry- 
ing it on will devolve upon you. Begin early and 
follow out the teaching of that old proverb, "Help 
yourself by helping others." 



AGGIE LIFE. 



It is quite frequeutlj' a matter of wonder among 
the students that baseball does not occupj' a more 
prominent position in the fall. A year ago it 
seemed as though this would eventually be the case 
but with the approach of this season foot-ball again 
takes up the attention of most of those who wish to 
go into athletics at all. And although base ball 
must suffer to some extent by the arrangement, it 
seems only fair that the foot-ball team should have 
the use of the field during its allotted season of the 
college year. But while the national game cannot 
expect to reach any great degree of popularity this 
term a little work on the diamond may serve to 
draw out new material from the lower classes. 
There are several vacancies in the team, which it is 
. hoped the Freshman class will fill in the spring. 
We are assured that battery work will go on during 
the fall and winter and if the enthusiasm that now 
must necessarily remain to a certain extent latent, 
will only show itself very apparently next winter, 
then we shall have no grounds to fear for the qual- 
ity of our next base ball team. 



At last the much talked of electives give promise 
of becoming realities and we naturally lof>k forward 
with interest and anticipation to the time when our 
hopes will be realized. In view of the broaden- 
ing of the course, the advisability of putting Ger- 
man into the curriculum seems to be generally 
recognized. Blany of our graduates upon the com- 
pletion of their course here, go to Germany for nd- 
vaLced sciences, hence the wisdom of previous 
study in the language can but commend itself. We 
already have a year in French included in the 
course, and while it is not our purpose to say a 
word against the study of French, German is pre- 
eminently the language of science, and as a college 
of science we ought to have preparation in the 
language which will be of the most benefit to us. 
There is little douljt but that if German was in- 
cluded in our curriculum, there would be enough 
students elect it to make a successful course. As 
the appropriation for the college has been so large- 
ly increased, the pfeaof inability from lack of funds 
cannot be urged by the college, and there is little 
doubt but the benefit to be derived from such a 
course would more than pay for the added expense 
which such an addition would necessitate. 



^©n-tribiited. 



BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS. 

The results of the appropriations made last spring 
for the Botanic Department are beginning to be 
visible. When the additions to the Durfee Plant 
House are finished, there will be an increase of 
surface under glass of over two thousand square 
feet. The old octagon with the lily room and the 
nortnwest pit v/ill remam as it is. The north 
and south pits are combined into one, thus securing 
greater depth and, as the glass used is larger, more 
light. The stove and cactus rooms are to be rebuilt 
with upright posts 7| ft. high in place of the old 
curved roof. 

At the east end of the cactus room is the new 
octagon, 40x40, with upright posts Vl feet high. 
At the end of this is the new rose-house, 20x25, 
with posts 7|- ft. The sash-bars are of cypress and 
are made on an improved pattern. The whole 
building is to be heated by two new Furman hot- 
water heaters. Each room will be so piped as to 
admit of special temperature regulation. The down 
hill system will be used, with from two to four-inch 
t^arriers. The ventilating arrangements are ample 
and easily regulated. 

The work is done by day labor thus ensuring 
thoroughness of coustraction. 

The increased length will add much to the outside 
appearance of the building, and with the better 
facilities for light, heating and ventilation, the plant 
house will more fully serve its purposes of illustra- 
tion and instruction. 

The new tool-house in process of construction at 
the rear of the Botanic Museum is another result of 
the above-mentioned appropriation. The building 
is to be about 80 by 30_, with a cellar under a portion 
of it. It will be divided into a tool-room, two work 
rooms, and three wagon sheds, besides an upper 
room extending over the whole structure. In one 
of the woik-rooms there will be a forge and boiler, 
and also a bench fitted with a ^ise. 

The work-rooms will furnish a suitable place lor 
making of iiats, mending of sash, and the doing of 
many other things, thus allowing the work-rooms at 
the plant-houses to be kept for their legitimate 
purposes. The addition of the storage-room will 
also fill a long-felt want. When these buildings are 



AGGIE LIFE. 



finished it is contemplated erecting a vegetable 
house connected with the Hatch plant house. With 
these new accommodations, the Botanic Department 
will be enabled to more adequately fi-ilfll the objects 
of its existence. 



THE Y. M. C. A. RECEPTION. 

The most successful Y. M. C. A. reception since 
the organization of the association was given to the 
Freshman class at the 'residence of Piof. Brooks on 
Tuesday evening of last week. At 8 o'clock the 
Faculty, the members of the Y. M. C. A. and the 
Freshmen began to assemble, and from that hour 
until 10 o'clock, when the gathering broke up, the 
time passed most pleasantly to everyone present- 
The opportunity for getting acquainted was well 
improved. Refreshments, too, received their due 
attention. 

Occasions of this kind, when the Faculty and 
students can meet socially, are but few during our 
college life, and the large attendance at this recep- 
tion and the interest taken, plainly show that they 
are highly appreciated by both the old and the new 
students. The president and other officers of the 
association who did so much towards making the 
reception an enjoyable occasion, are to be congratu- 
lated on their success. Many thanks are due Prof. 
Brooks and other members of the Faculty who gave 
the work their hearty support. 

Now it remains to be seen what the effect will be. 
The object of these gatherings, let it be understood, 
is to get acquainted with the members of the incom- 
ing class, to have them get acquainted with us, to 
show them that we have an active Y^oung Men's 
Christain Association in this college, and to try to 
induce them to join and work with us. 

Few Freshmen have as yet attended our prayer- 
meetings. But wfc hope, now that they have become 
better acquainted with us- and with the college, that 
many new men will see fit to come to our meetings, 
where they will be sure to reap much pleasure and 
profit. 



VACATION MEMORIES. 

Just a little picnic 

Down beside the sea, 
Just a fragrant flower 

Someone picked for me, 
Just a careless ramble 

O'er the rocky shore, 
Sounds of merry laughter 

Lost for evermore. 

Just a little summer 

Gone as summers go, 
Days and hours are passing 

How we never know. 
Just a little parting. 

Very sad, just then. 
Just a little promise 

To be kept till— when? 
^ 

THE FRESHMAN CLASS. 



She was a maiden, 

Heavily laden, 
A bucket of cherries had she. 

From over the stile 

A lofty smile 
Was all that she offered to me. 



Burrington, Horace C. 
Clapp, Frank L. 
Cook, Allen B. 
Cm-ley, Walter J. 
Do Luce, Frank E. 
Dodge, William B. 
Edwards, Harry T. 
Fletcher, Stephen W. 
Geary, Hiram G. 
Green, J. Elton 
Hammar, James F. 
Harper, Walter B. 
Hayward, Ralph L. 
Hubbard, Guy A. 
Jones, Benjamin E. 
Kinney, Asa S. 
Kinsman, Ernest E. 
Ki-amer, Albin M. 
Marshall, .James L. 
Moore, Henry W. 
Morse, Sydney W. 
Nichols, Robert P. 
Nutting, Charles A. 
Pentecost, William L. 
Poole, Erford W. 
Poole, I. Chester 
Eawson, Herbert W. 
Read, Frederick H. 
Robinson, T. Dean 
Roper, Harry H. 
Saito, Seijiro 
Sastre, Salome 
Scannel, Michael E. 
Sellew, Merle E, 
Shaw, Frederick B. 
Shultis, Newton 
Shurtleff, Walter D. 
Stoddard, Samuel H. 
Tsuda, George 
Vallentine, Florence M. 
-Vaughan, Robert H. 
Walsh, Thomas F. 
Washburn, Frank P. 
Wentzell, Benjamin .J. 



Charlemont, 

Dorchester, 

Petersham, 

Upton, 

Wan-en, 

Boston, 

Chesteriield, 

Middleboro, 

Pelham, 

Spencer, 

Swampscott, 

Wakefield, 

Uxbridge, 

Ashby, 

Middlefleld, 

Worcester, 

Heath, 

Clinton, 

Lancaster, 

Worcester, 

Foxboro, 

Norwell, 

Leominster, 

Worcester, 

No. Dartmouth, 

No. Dartmouth, 
Arlington, 

Wilbraham, 

Petersham, 

East Hubbardston, 

Nemuro, .Japan, 

New York, N. Y., 

Amherst, 

East Longmeadow, 

So. Amherst, 

Medford, 

Carver, 
Rockland, 
Tokio, Japan, 
Florence, 
Worcester, 
No. Amherst, 
No. Perry, Me., 
Amherst, 



Farm House 
D.K. Bangs' 

W. M. Shepardson's 

6N. C. 

Mr. Gilbert's 

14 N. C. 
ISS. C. 
31 N. C. 

15 N. C. 
4 8. C. 

D. K.Bangs' 

Mrs. Clark's 

W. M. Shepardson's 

11 N. C. 
Farm House 

7N. C. 
31 N. C. 

14 N. C. 
Mr . Gilbert's 

4N. 0. 

• 22 N. C. 

Prof. Brooks' 

22 N. C. 
4N. C. 

12 S. C. 
12S. C. 

D. K. Bangs' 

23 N. C. 
W.M. Shepardson's 

D. K. Bangs' 

■ 12 N. C. 

D. G. K. House 

Home 

13 N. C. 
Home 

15 S. C. 
Mrs. Clark's 

7N. C. 

27N. C. 

Prof. Warner's 

26 N. C. 

Home 

8 S. C. 

Home 



AGGIE LIFE. 



BATTALION ORGANIZATION. 

Commandant and Instructor, 

1st Lieut. Walter M. Dickinson, 17th Infantry, U.S. A. 

Major. 

F. H. Henderson. 

COMMISSIOKED STAFF. 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant, J. R. Perry 

" " " Quartermaster, F. S. Hoyt 

" " " Fire Marshall, H. J. Harlow 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Sergeant-Major, H. P. Smead 

Quartermaster-Sergeant, G. H. Merwin 

COLOR GUARD. 

Sergeant, L. H. Bacon 

Corporal, F. L. Greene 

Corporal, A. J. Morse 

COMPANY A. 

Captain, 

First Lieutenant, 

Second Lieutenant, 

First Sergeant, 



Duty Sergeant, 

it. it 

Corporal, 



Captain, 
First Lieutenant, 
Second " 
First Sergeant, 
Duty 



COMPANY B. 



Corporal, 



Captain, 

First Lieutenant, 
Second " 
First Sergeant, 
Duty " 

Corporal, 



COMPANY c. 



A. E. Meleudy 

F. A. Smith 

E. J. Walker 
T. S. Bacon 

L. Manley 

J. H. Putnam 

H. M. Fowler 

W. E. Sanderson 

E. T. Dickinson 

H. J. Fowler 

G. F. Curley 
L. W. Smith 

J Baker 

A. C. Curtis 

R. E. Smith 

A. L. Brown 

L. M. Barker 

C. H. Higgins 

C. H. Spaulding 

H. D. Clark 

F. G. Bartlett 
F. T. Harlow 
J. E. Gifford 

C. P. Lounsbury 

A. H. Kirkland 

A. H. Cutter 

G. E. Smith 

E. H. Alderman 



COMPANY D. 



Captain, 

First Lieutenant, 
Second " 
First Sergeant, 
Duty 

Corporal, 



C. A. Goodrich 

E. A. Hawkes 

H. F. Staples 

S. F. Howard 

H. G. Stoekwell 

F. D. White 

C. F. Walker 

L. J. Shepard 

H. W. Lewis 



CLARK CADET BAND. 



First Lieutenant, 

" Sergeant and Drum Major, 



E. H. Lehnert 
P. E. Davis 



BEADING ROOM ASSOCIATION. 

REPORT OF TREASURER. 



Amount on hand Sept. 9, 1891, 
Received for papers, 
Received from taxes. 



Paid last year's bills, 
For papers. 

Carrying mail. 

Lighting, 

Postage, 

P. 0. Boxes, 

Supplies, 

Amount on hand Sept. 9, 1892, 



$ .75 

39.00 

178.06 

$217.81 



S 15.00 

118.75 

62.69 

4.75 

.33 

5.53 

9.88 



$216.93 



$ 217.81 
Respectfully submitted, 

F. H. Henderson, .Sec and Treas. 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 



FOOT-BALL. 

GAMES ARRANGED : 

24 — Trinity at Hartford. 
29— Amherst at Pratt Field. 

1 --Worcester Polytechnic lust, at Amherst. 

8 — Mt. Henron at Amherst. 
15 — W. P. 1. at Worcester. 

5 — Y. M. C. A. Training School at Amherst. 
F. H. Henderson, Manager. 



Entomology teaches of gnats on the wing. 
It is always the female who carries the sting. 
So take beed, my boys, and bear this in mind; 
The same rule holds true of fair womankind. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Collect f^o-tfs- 



— The flag is being repaired. 

— Amherst college opeued last Thursday. 

— Brown and Merwin '94, now ride safeties. 

— The diuing-room of the Boarding Club has been 
enlarged. 

— The sprinting season at the vineyard has com- 
menced. 

— Walker, '93, went home last week for a short 
vacation. c 

— Lieut. L. W. Cornish was visiting in Boston 
last week. 

— Foot ball interest is high but tennis should not 
be forgotten. 

— Efforts will be made in a short time to form a 
Republican club. 

— For foot-ball goods call on Harry Clark at 
Blodgett & Clark's. 

—The Glee Club is soon to select two men to 
fill present vacancies. 

— The proposed Senior trip to New York has been 
indefinitely postponed. 

— F. L. Warren, '95, sustained quite an injury 
while playing foot ball. 

— Staples, '93, was obliged to go home last week 
on account of sickness. 

— Politics seem to have been crowded out of the 
student's mind thus far. 

— E. D. White will have charge of the ringing of 
the bell the coming year. 

— About a dozen students remained to work dur- 
ing the summer vacation. 

— The striking of the new clock is a new and 
pleasing feature of this term. 

— Lewis, '94, is mail-carrier for the tei-m, with 
Hemenway, '95, as substitute. 

— The target is undergoing repairs and will soon 
be ready for the term's practice. 

— Park, Robbins and Sanford of '94, and Wil- 
liams, '95, will not return this year. 

— The number of students now in college is 139, 
divided as follows : seniors, 21 ; juniors, 36 ; sopho- 
moae8,38 ; freshmen, 44. 



—The officers of Companies C and D are drilling 
the Freshmen in setting up exercises. 

— Lieut. W. M. Dickenson will reside at the 
Amherst House during his detail at the college. 

— H. G. Stockwell and H. P. Smead are running 
the South dormitory heating apparatus this term. 

— There has recently been a reduction of salary 
for the assistants at the State Experiment station. 

— Lieut. L. W. Cornish has been stopping with 
Prof. Warner during his stay at the college this term. 

— The class of '96 will furnish an unusually large 
amount of talent to the different musical organiza- 
tions. 

— Aggie plays Trinity the coming Saturday. A 
large delegation should accompany the team to- 
Hartford. 

— The goal posts are soon to be placed in posi- 
tion, near South college. The back stop however 
will not be moved this year. 

— All college exercises previously scheduled to^ 
occur Friday afternoon have been cancelled to allow 
the afternoon free for athletics. 

— The drill hour lias been changed from 4.15, aa 
scheduled, to 3.15 in order to allow the foot ball 
team ample time for practice. 

— The rock in the southeastern corner of the 
campus was removed by several of the students who 
remained during the vacation. 

— A dam which will be a credit to the college i& 
soon to materialize. Plans have been drawn up and 
the work will soon be commenced. 

— Second-hand furniture establishments have been 
far more scarce in college this year than is usual. 
Does this show lack of enterprise? 

— Prof. C. H. Fernald is absent from college 
this week in performance of his duties as scientific 
advisor to the Gypsy Moth department. 

— Through the courtesy of Prof. Maynard, the 
Juniors have had practical instruction in plum, peach 
and grape testing during the last few days. 

— The college will he pleased to learn that Prof. 
Warner will very soon be able to assume his duties 
in the mathematical department. Although he has 
not as yet fully recovered, he is very anxious to get 
back to his work, and will undoubtedly be with us 
in another week. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



— G. B. Willarcl,'92, a former Business manager 
of the Life, recently visited tlie college. He is now 
employed by a large grain and feed house of Spring- 
field. 

— There is the usual scarcity of rooms during the 
first few weeks of the college year. The dormitories 
are more than full, and outside accommodations are 
in demand. 

— Class room instruction in bayonet exercises is 
now in order. This feature of the military drill has 
not been present since the administration of Lieut. 
G. E. Sage. 

— The Junior trip to Boston and vicinity has been 
postponed until sometime during the first of Oct., 
in order to allow the class to attend the Mass. Hor- 
ticultural show. 

— During the past vacation, the college library has 
been enlarged by several collections of books, of in- 
structive nature, in connection with the various col- 
lege departments. 

— Owl Club operations have been in full blast the 
last week. The organization is doing much toward 
acquainting the Freshmen with the joys of life, and 
dormitory life in particular. 

— A. Davis, '95, has left college. He was the 
sophomore editor on the Life staff, and his loss 
is much regretted, not only by his brother edi- 
tors but by his class and the college. 

— E. Dwyer, ex-'95, is foreman of the incandes- 
cent light and carbon rooms in Thomson, Houston 
electric light works. He is also carrying on exper- 
iments in connection with the company. 

— E. O. Bagg and L. Manly attended the Spring- 
field Bicycle races last week. The former acted as 
starter for his brother in the races. R. P. Sellew, 
'89, acted as one of the clerks of the course. 

— F. S. Hoyt will represent the New York Trib- 
une at the college the coming year ; T. F.Keith, the 
Springfield Republican ; A. H. Kirkland,the Boston 
Journal ; and T. S. Bacon, the Boston Globe. 

— The Freshman class has organized, the follow- 
ing officers having been elected : — 

President — Frank L. Clapp. 

Vice President — Guy A. Hubbard. 

Secretary — Albin M. Kramer. 

Treasurer — Ralph L. Hayward. 

Captain — Horace C. Burrington. 



— The freshman class is favored by the presence 
of the first representative of the fair sex to take 
the regular course. Miss F. Valentine of Florence. 

— Twenty candidates for admission were turned 
away on account of their failure to satisfactorily 
pass the examinations, and yet the class of ninty- 
six is an excellent one in numbers as well as in 
other respects. 

— There is the usual amount of confusion in the 
military department attendant upon the uniforming 
of the freshmen class, while in the ranks of the 
"coms" and "non-coms" shoulder straps and chev- 
rons are in demand. 

— The sophomores have been divided into two 
sections for drill, the artillery detachment composed 
of sixteen picked men under command of the officers 
of Co. A. and the remainder are to have bayonet 
drill under the officers of Co. B. 

— The baccalaureate sermon, delivered in the col- 
lege chapel last commencement by Prof. Chas. S. 
Walker was printed in full in the July number of 
the Treasury of Religious Thought. A portrait and 
biography of Prof. Walker accompany the sermon ; 
also a full page cut of the stone chapel. 

— The orchestra has reorganized this term and 
has commenced holding its regular rehearsals. The 
old members are all back, and with the addition of 
some fine material from the Freshman class this or- 
ganization hopes soon to be able to hold a promi- 
nent position among the musical organizations of 
the college. 

— The class of '94 has elected the following offi- 
cers for the ensuing term : — 

President — R. E. Smith. 

Vice-President — A. J. Morse. , 

Secretary — H. M. Fowler. 

Treasurer — G. H. Merwin. 

Historian — T. F. Keith. 

Sergeant-at-arms — P. E. Davis. 

Class Captain — E. L. Boardman. 

— The books of the library are to be drawn under 
a new system. Hereafter a book may be kept two 
weeks and at the end of that time may be renewed 
once. A small receptacle for a card giving the date 
when the book was taken out, has been placed on 
the inside of the back cover of each book. The sys- 
tem is very satisfactory. A fine of two cents a day 
will be collected from those keeping books out over 
the time. 



8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



MASS MEETING. 

The annual mass meeting was held .Sept. 9, Pres. 
Goodrich in the chair. Reports of the secretaries 
of the various associatious were duly accepted. 

Voted, that the Athletic Association levy a tax 
sufficient to pay the interest on the principle, SIOOO, 
which the trustees have appropriated for the build- 
ing of a stone dam, but which does uot become 
available until Jan. 1. 

Voted, that the different classes elect the direct- 
ors of the respective associations by classes, before 
the first .Saturday night of the fall term, with the 
exception of the freshman class, who shall not elect 
the directors from their class until Oct. 1, the 
directors thus chosen to elect their own ofHcers ; 
also, that the treasurers of such associations in as 
far as is practicable publish their reports in the 
college publication. 

Voted, that the president appoint a committee of 
four to see about adopting a college lapel button. 

VALUABLE ADDITIONS TO THE 
MUSEUMS. 

Immediately after the iiaymeiit of the lirsl instal- 
ment of m(. ney, to this college, from the general 
government last spring, it was announced that a 
portion of it would be expended in purchasing various 
models to be placed in the museum for the use of 
the Veterinary and Physiological departments. The 
principal modePwas that of a full-sized horse which 
was ordered from Paris and was not expected for 
several months. Contrary to expectation, it was 
received during the early part of this month and has 
been placed in the museum, and will be used by Dr. 
Paige in his lectures to the class in veterinary. 

This, however, is not the only addition which first 
attracts the attention, as a magnificent specimen of 
a full-grown moose is mounted near by and in a 
neighboring cabinet is to be lound an excellent 
specimen of the puma, better known as the Ameri- 
can panther. 

As other curiosities, there are to be found well 
pieserved specimens of a hedgehog, a porcupine, 
both gray and red squirrels, a hooded cobra, and a 
rattlesnake with a full set of rattles, fifteen in 
number. 

In the physiological department there is a half 
section of a human head, a hand three times the 
natural size, and a tongue and its appendages. 



New cabinets are soon to be built and placed in 
the museum, and for these there is great need, as 
the stpecimens are at present crowded and in some 
cases injured by being allowed to remain in their 
present condition. 



ASSOCIATION OFFICERS. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

Directors : H. C. Davis, '93, H. F. Staples, 
'93, J. E. Giflford, '94, L. Manley. '94, H. A. Bal- 
lon, '95. 

BASE-BALL ASSOCIATION. 

Directors : G. F. Curley, '93, C. A. Goodrich, 
'93, P. E. Davis, '94, A. J. Nourse, '94, A. F. 
Burgess, '95. 

FOOT-BALL ASSOCIATION. 

Directors: Pres., J. R. Perry, '93, E. C. How- 
ard, '93 ; sec'y and treas., E. L. Boardman, '94, J. 
H. Putnam, '94, E. 0. Bagg, '95. 

POLO ASSOCIATION. 

Directors : E. H. Lehnert, '93, L. A. Tinoco, 
'93, I. C. Greene, '94, S. F. Howard, '94, W. C. 
Brown, '95. 

JIEADING-ROOM ASSOCIATION. 

Directors: F. H. Henderson, '93, J. Baker, '93; 
sec'y and treas., A. C. Curtis, '94, H. G. Stockwell, 
'94, D. C. Potter. '95. 

TENNIS ASSOCIATION. 

Directors: E. J. Walker, '93, L. W. Smith, '93, 
T. S. Bacon, '94. H. M. Fowler, '94, A. B. Smith, 
'95. 



Y. M. C. A. TOPICS. 

Sept. 22. — The service, joy and peace of the Chris- 
tian life. Gal. 6 : 9, 10 ; Acts 2 : 46-47. 
E. H. Alderman. 

Sept. 25.— Who is called to work? 1 Peter 4 : 10. 
L. W. Smith. 

Sept. 29.— Our uext dutv. Luke 9 : 23. E. D. 
White. 

Oct. 2. — Our needs richly supplied. Phil. 4:19. 
E. A. Hawks. 



She isn't an angel, she isn't a goddess, 

She isn't a lily, a rose or a pearl; ^ 
She's simply what's neatest, the sweetest, completest, 

A dear little, queer little, sweet little girl. 

Ex. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



NOTICE. 
The vacanc}- in the Life Board made by the resig- 
nation of A. Davis, '95, will make it necessary to 
elect a new man from the Sophomore class. How 
he is to be chosen is the question which is at present 
being agitated in the minds of the Senior members 
of the Board. The eontribntious coming from '95 
have in the past been very few ; so few that it 
wpuld be impossible to intelligently choose a man 
with the proper qualifications, one who would 
undoubtedly prove an ardent worker for the welfare 
of his college publication. The election will take 
place Wednesday, Sept. 28, and it seems only fair 
to expect, before that date, a carefully prepared 
contribution from every man in the Sophomore class 
who has a desire to become a member of the edito- 
rial staff. This seems to be the only feasible plan, 
• and it is to be hoped that each individual man will 
make it such a matter of class pride that the compe- 
tition shall be as great as it deservedly should be. 

— [Ed. 



THE AUTUMN GAME. 
With the opening of college begins the foot-ball 
season. This year the team started in their prac- 
tice almost a week before any previous year. So 
far the practice has been very good, with the 
exception of one thing, and that is, we do not have 
enough men out to make up two elevens. It is very 
important that all should come out and practice. 
Do not drop off simply because you do not succeed 
in getting on the team the very first thing, but keep 
working and try to excel those who are at present 
your superiors. If everyone should drop off in that 
way, soon we would have no team at all. Last year 
it was practice that brought us up to what we were, 
but if we had had moie men to play against regularly 
every day, the team would have been better. We 
cannot make a good showing if only bo many men 
come out each day. We must have enough so that 
the team can i)lay together and practice all on one 
side. To do this we must have some fourteen or 
fifteen men on the opposite side. So let every one 
in college who takes any interest at all, turn out. 
We play our first game Saturday, and there is no 
reason why we should not make a strong showing 
against our opponents. We hope to have a better 
team this year than ever before, and to play more 



games and better teams than have been played in 
the past few years. To do this we must have money. 
At the college meeting, the two upper classes showed 
a good deal of spirit, but the lower classes, consid- 
ering their numbers, did not give as much as they 
ought. It should be a matter of class pride to see 
who would give the most, and to a certain extent 
the upper classes feel that way. Now let every one 
give as much as he can, and when we play games 
on our own grounds every one should come out and 
encourage the team as much as possible, and show 
by his enthusiasm that not only is he interested in 
the team, but that he feels a conscious pride in the 
college which he calls his own. 



APPLIED BOTANY. 

"A kiss for each flower," I gaily said; 

She had violets pinned at her breast. 
But her face grew sad and she turned away, 

With a sigh of deep unrest. 

Then she raised her black eyes to mine once more, 

And I thought I saw a tear 
As her sweet voice softly, falt'ringly said, 

"There are only two dozen here." 

Schillare's 
Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
■ WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIN SIREET, 



XOHTHAMPTON, MASS. 



10 



AGGIE LIFE. 



umm 



Albert I. Hayward, '88, lias given up his posi- 
tioa as agriculturist to the Maryland Agricultural 
Experiment Station for a situation at Mamaroneck, 
N. Y. 

J. B. Blair, '89, made tlie college a brief visit 
this week. 

II. J. Feld, '91, enters Cornell this fall. He in- 
tends taking an advanced course in chemistry. 

A. Belden, ex-'9), on .Sept. 1, became the happ}- 
papa of a daughter. 

NINETY-TWO. 

A. F. Beats, Sanderson St., Greenfield, Mass., 
Florist. 

W. I. Boynton, Amherst, Mass., Dentistry. 

H. E. Crane, Quiucy, Mass., Grain store. 

J.E.Deuel, 40 Norfolk St., Boston, Mass., 
Pharmaceutical Chemist, 148 Dudley .St., Boston. 

H. B. Emerson, Lynn. Mass., Thompson, Hous- 
ten Electric Light Company. 

J. L. Field, 4826 Kimbark, Ave., Chicago, 111. 

W. Fletcher, '92, is clerking in Boston freight 
office. 

C. S. Graham, Holden, Mass., Farmer. 

E. B. Holland, Amherst, Mass., Mass. State 
Exp. Station. 

C. M. Hubbard, Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

J. B. Knight, 21 High St., Medford, Mass., 
Special Inspector on the Gypsy Moth Dep't of the 
Mass. Board of Agiiculture. 

E. P. Lymau, 45 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass., 
Student of Harvard Veterinary Hospital, 50 Village 
St., Boston. 

F. H. Plumb, Short Hills, N. J. P'lorist. 
Elliot Rogers, 42 Gardner St., Bostou, Mass., 

Shippmg clerk, 108 Lincoln St., Boston. 

R. H. Smith, Amherst, Mass., Mass. State Exp. 
Station. 

Francis G. Stockbridge, Fargo, North Dakota. 

George E. Taylor, Greenfield, Mass., Box 1111., 
Farmer, Shelburne. Mass. 

H. M. Thomson, Amherst, Mass., Assistant 
Agriculturist, Hatch Exp. Station. 

Homer C. West. Belchertown, Mass., Farmer. 

M. H. Williams intends to enter the Harvard 
School of Veterinary, which opens the 29th inst. 



G. B. Willard, 43 Vernon St.. Springfield, Mass. 
Travelling Salesman for Mark Shultis, Grain Dealer 
6('l Chamber of Commerce, Boston, Mass. 



TENNIS. 

On a summer day I love to play 

I love to play 
With the racquet, net and ball. 

And a maiden fair 

With golden hair 
And a laughing face withal. 

As the summer breeze 

Among the trees, 
Is whispering soft and low, 

I fling to the air 

Life's toil and care, 
And play at love's game, you know. 



W. 



j^. 2S. F'ETIT. 



INSTRUCTOR IS 



Is noTV forming: a class in dancing for M. A. C. men. There will be 
an advanced division for those who can dance already, in which the 
latest dances will be taught. For terms inquire at my Hall. 

,e®-Members of ray former classes as well as the" present ones 
can obtain admission cards to the Receptions by applying at the Hall. 
Residence and Hali-, Dickinson's Block. 



STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 

FIRST CLASS GOODS. PRICES iOTT. 

13 SOUTH COLLEiaE:. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

ratiYe Steam Laundry^' 

and Carpet Reiiovatiii [staislimenl 

Aggie Agent, C. L BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

S\'Qt- SA^TISFA-CXIOI^T C3-XJA-Ii.A.N'TBEI>,it'&^ 
OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



II 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you Iniow that we are 

Uiwlm for Sliiifil'§ Supplies. 

" Lamps and Laiiip Gooiis areOiiii" 

WIZLIAMS' BLOCB, AMBERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

, FEED i 

T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

A.MHEBST, MASS. 



DEALER IN 



FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

FII?E GTiLTIDlfERY. 
REPAIRING NEATLY AND ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 




.A^nVCIiEIlST, 



Is/LA^iSS,. 



8-15 A. M., 
S-30 A. M. 



SCHEDULE. 

GEXEEAL EXERCISES. 
Chapel. I 10.30 A. M., 



Insp. rooms, Sat. 1 3-15 p. M., 
CLASS EXERCISES. 

SOPHMORE. 



Church, Sunday 
Drill, M. T. Th. 



SENIOR. 
A. M. 

S-30. Mental Science. Chemi.'sti-y, M. T. Tli. F 

English, W. 
9.30. Agriculture, M.Tu.W.Th. French. 
Debates, F. 



10-30. Chemisti-y, M. Tii. T. 
11-30. Chemistry. 

p. M. 
1-45. Veterinary. 

JUNIOR. 

A. ai. 
8-30. Agriculture, M. T. 

Jlechanics, W. Th. F. 
9-30. Market Gardening, F. 



10-30. Zoology, M. T. W. Th. 

Market Gardening, F. 

11-30. Zoology, M. T. W. Th. 

Market Gardening, F. 

p. M. 

1.45. Ehetoric, M. T. W.Th. 



Agriculture. 

Trigonometry, M. Tu. W. Th. 

English, F. 

Botany, M. Tu. W. Th. 

FRESHMAN. 

Botany. 

Chemistry, M. Tu. Th. 
English, W. 
Algebra, F. 
Algebra, M. T. W. Th 
Chemistry, F. 
Latiu, M. T. W. Th. 
Chemistry, F. 

English, Th. 



Additional e.'ceicises in English and Military Science, as directed- 



NOTICES. 

Malls leave the cuUege for the post-office at 1 p. m. and 
7-40 p. M. on week clays. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Sprlngfleld, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 p. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massa/- 
chusetts, 7-45, 10-45, A. M. 4 00, 6-45 p. M. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-45 a. 
M. 4-00, 6 45 p. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 45, 8-30 p. m. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 A. M. 4-00, 8-30 p. M. 

The President will be at his office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurei' will be at his office fi'om 3 to 5 
p. M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays tliroughout 
the term. 

The college Hbiary will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 

The museum of natural history will be open to 
visitors from 4-30 to 5-30 p. Ji. Mondays, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays ; from 3 to 4 p. m. Wednesdays, 
and Fridays. Will be closed Saturday's and 
Sundays. 



12 



AGGIE LIFE. 



TilE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes i Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Sh.eet JVIusic, 



FOR Th 



Miasic Books, 
Strings 

ie: violin, banjo, ouitar. 



CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



a.i>/Ih;erst. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 



..^DENTISTS. 5).. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTmGTON, D. D. S. 

CVTIiEIt'S BZ,OCK, J.MHEJtST.IMASS. 



OFFICE HOURS : 
B .A.. TiOL. TO S F. HVC. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

CrOOB WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PBTSICIANH' PRBSCBIPTIONS CAB,MFVLI,T 
COMPOUNDED, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCENIi ROW. 

Order your COi^£ here. 

WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



LODGETT & CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



For Suits and Fall QverEoats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



FINE ITAL Ai FAIEMCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, S3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, S2.00, .$2.50 and §3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O. G. COIJCM & SON'S» 
FRANK C. PLLTMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseau, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass, 



-L-L v^_^ 



H 



H 



FRESH S-HH FINE. 



'S DRUG STORE, 

Amtierst House Block, - Amiierst iass, 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure- Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sjjorting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls resjionded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850- 



1892. 



THE FHOTDG-RiLPHE.R. 

NEVy SKY LIGHT- 
EINUARGEID OPERA-TING ROOM. 

CLASS AND SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY, 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



5. g. DICTC^gOC^, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 
WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m.. 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



g^^-Ether aud Nitrous Oxicle Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T THE 



AMHERST CASH SH0Ei STBREi 

You can get the most for j'our money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 

A. GLYNN, 

4T A 1 LO^' 



./ 



Repairing Neatly Done. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specially. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



IVIilitapy Suits and Tpimmings. 



assachusells Aaricultural CoHeae, 




j^ 



-€^. U) 




AGGIE 





iLMHERST, MASS., DCT. 5, iB52. 



VDL. III. 



IfD. 2. 



• PRINTERS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURy^L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would iuform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FKUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers ami Small Fi'uits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



THE ABlHEeST 



FDll 



m 




n 



uARPt 



im 



C, H, SANDERSOf(«L CO,, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEp^ k ThOMPSOI^, 



CASH DEALEKS IK 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVERYBODY. 



sto:r.e. 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES. PILLOWS, STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS. LOUNGES. 



WINDO W SH ADE^_DRAFERIE S , 

CARPETS, RUGS. ETC.. ETC. 

All Groods STUICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST PS,ICES. 

E. D. MARSH, 

10 PHCENIX ROW, - - AMHERST, MASS. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ISTJBBEIS C^OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



E,BI>A.IK,I]SrC3- DOISrE I>K.OI.^E»TL-^. 



T. V\A. SLOAN, 

3 l'H<E}flX ROW. 



Erai^tkal Siarr]ber, 

STEAM AND GAS rsjlER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam aud Hot Water Heating a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBEE 5, 1892. 



No. 2 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at tlie Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD or JEDITOBS : 

G. F. CUKLEY, '»3, Editor-in-Chief, 

J. E. PEERT, '93, Business Manager, 

E. C. HOWARD, '93, F. S. HOTT, '93, 

A. E. MELESDY, '93. C. F. WALKEE, '94, 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

T. P. FOLEY, '95. 

Please address all commTinicatione to tlie Business Manager. 



tK^^l^V^^^ ^ Miti^t^liVi^t^ ?"i\H-^t^%. 






As the cold weather is eomiug ou, those of us 
who do not take part in football are beginning to 
realize that our chances for physical improvement 
are becoming limited, and when once the snow has 
begun to fly, our only resource will be the gymna- 
sium. It is iiiifoi'tunate that we have not a gym- 
nasium vehich will compare with those of other col- 
leges, but such as we have we should make the 
most of. But in order to do this, the apparatus, 
which has now become badly disorganized, should 
be put in order, and many new pieces of apparatus 
which would be of inestimable value as aids to 
physical culture, could be put in at a comparatively 
small expense. If our base ball team is to do good 
work next spring, it must have indoor practice this 
winter, hence the necessity is evident of having 
some kind of guards for the electric light globes. 
The athletic association has the power to make 
these improvements, and if the oflScers start the 
ball, there is little doubt but that it will be kept 
rolhng by the members of the association. 



Once more it becomes the painful duty of the 
editoi to remind the college of its pledge to tender 
literary support to the columns of the Life. There 
is an idea more or less prevalent among the stu- 
dents that the board in some mysterious manner 
gets hold of its manuscript and thus the paper 
comes out automatically once in two weeks. 
Aljandou this idea. Just so much sifted material 
is necessary for every issue and if you individually 
do not come forward and give your aid, then you 
unjustly impose upon the men you have chosen to 
manage the publication. Not only should every 
man take an interest in this matter in loyalty to 
the college but his pride should be such that his 
class at least could not be stigmatized as being in- 
different toward literary work. If the students 
will look at the subject in the proper light, every 
man will furnish his contributions willingly and will 
feel grateful that he has at hand a medium through 
which he can express his ideas, and thus give the 
public the benefit of their desert. 



We regret the fact of being once more called 
upon to censure the action of certain members of 
the college for their deeds of last Thursday night. 
The place where Sabbath worship is held is surely 
no place for the spirit of destructiveness and 
desecration to show itself. While it is by no 
means our purpose to uphold such practices and 
tricks as were perpetrated last week, if they must 
be done, let the line be drawn at the house of God. 
We have suffered one outrageous profanation be- 
fore this, and the sentiment of the college as a 
whole is, fortunately, strong against such actions. 
In connection with its other uses. Stone Chapel 
is a house of worship, and any man or body of 
men who cause confusion of any kind in a place 
set apart for religious worship, are committing an 
offence which is one of the greatest insults possible 
to the better element of the student body. It may 



14 



AGGIE LIFE. 



be tliat the trick, if so it may be called, of last 
week, was done in thoughtlessness of the sauticity 
of the place. We hope such was the case, but in 
any event it was a deed upon which we hope in the 
future never to be called again to pass judgment. 



The different college organizations and associa- 
tions often suffer because the students do not co- 
operate with those who have the work directly in 
charge. This is not always because there is a 
large lack of interest on the part of the students, 
but because it is too often taken for granted that 
those especially appointed to look after the inter- 
ests of the different organizations will do the re- 
quired work without assistance. On first thought 
it would appear that the oflScers and directors of an 
association or the editors of a paper are enough in 
number to accomplish what is expected of the or- 
ganization they represent. But in nearly every 
case investigation shows that there is more labor 
to perform than is at first apparent. A college 
organization implies not only representation of the 
student body in the form of a board of directors, 
but also co-operation by the students individually. 
Because our paper is conducted by nine editors, 
selected by their college mates, it is no reason why 
all the material which goes to make up the different 
issues should come from their pen. Such a course 
would soon lower the standard of the paper. It 
would contain only the expression of the thoughts 
of a very limited number of men, instead of voicing 
the sentiments of the whole college. And so it is 
with all the associations. Let there be hearty co- 
operation on the part of the students with all or- 
ganizations which have the interests of the college 
in control. 



An effort was made last year to secure for the 
college such representation in newspaper circles as 
it is accorded to other institutions no larger than 
our own ; and, as a result, correspondents were ob- 
tained for several of the leading journals. This 
fall the number has been increased and a press 
club formed, which includes some six or eight of 
our representative men. Though well aware that 
this is but a small beginning, still it is a step in the 
right direction and as such we are glad to give it 
our encouragement and support. The benefits 



which can accrue to the college from an active press 
club are not to be lightl}- estimated for it is by 
means of bright, crisp news items in the daily 
papers that outsiders get those general and favor- 
able impressions of our college which tend toward 
increased membership. There are many ways by 
which we can aid our Alma Mater in becoming better 
known but probably there is no readier means of 
reaching and influencing the general public than 
through the medium of the news columns of the 
daily papers. It is therefore with a feeling of 
hearty good will that we wish our Press Club the 
best of success in its endeavors to forward the in- 
terests of the M. A. C. 



BASE-BALL ASSOCIATION. 
teeasuker's report. 



Brought forward, 


$ 79.59 


Received from subscriptions, 


293.50 


Received from Guarantees, etc., 


49.90 




$422.99 


Paid for equipment, 


§106.08 


Worli done, 


7.85 


Base slide, 


12.00 


Screens in Drill Hall, 


17.48 


Ten shirts and caps. 


25.00 


Traveling expenses. 


122.60 


Guarantees, 


25.00 


Printing, 


8.00 


Express and telegrams, 


7.00 


Miscellaneous, 


15.90 






Amount on hand Sept. 7th, 1892, 


• 76.08 




$422.99 


Respectfully submitted. 




Chas. a. Goodrich, 


Sec. and Treas. 



GABD. 

The college orchestra wishes to announce itself 
ready for the seasons engagements. Last year proved 
a very successful one for the organization, but being 
supplemented by new talent this term, and having 
obtained new and popular music, it is confident of 
its capability to give still greater satisfaction in both 
concert and dance work. Particulars may be had 
by addressing 

E. H. Lehnert, Manager. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



IS 



^on'trsbuted. 



CRANKS. 

The old Quaker who said to his wife, "Hannah, 
all the world but thee and me is queer, and thee is 
a little queer !" gave expression to his perception 
of the diversitj- of human natures. The universal 
tendency to variation from given types produces 
such an infinite number of different forms, that our 
senses are not tired by too frequent contact with 
objects exactly alike. This truth holds in the 
psychical world as well as in the physical universe. 

Yet, in spite of the fact that diversity seems to 
be a natural law, men are continually striving to 
become more like each other, to be, as it were, 
shaped in the same mould. Those who do not suc- 
ceed in the attempt to conform themselves to the 
particular pattern in vogue, receive various appel- 
lations more or less opprobrious. One of the most 
common of these epithets is used to denote one who 
who is so possessed by one special idea, opposed 
to the ordinary mode of thought, as to pursue it to 
extremes and sacrifice to its furtherance all those 
ambitions and pleasures that engross the attention 
of the multitude. In our expressive Yankee ver- 
nacular such a one is called a '-crank." 
I The word is used colloquially with its meaning 
probably derived from its application in mechanics. 
In that branch of physics, crank is the term ap- 
plied to a crooked rod revolving in a limited circle 
and acting as a lever. Hence it has come to mean 
one who deflects from what seems to us to be the 
straight and reasonable course of action. This 
adaptation of the word is not wholly modern, for 
we find an obsolete use of it as synonymous with 
foolish. At present its two most common uses are 
in its mechanical application and its colloquial 
sense. Often the two are combined when a teacher 
giving object lessons with physical apparatus, de- 
scribes a machine as being turned by a crank. In- 
variably a smile sweeps over the faces of the listen- 
ing pupils as they mentally confirm his statement, 
but in a different sense. 

For classification there are base-ball cranks, 
sporting cranks, socialistic cranks, religious cranks 
and a few hundreds of other kinds of cranks. But 
we have at present to deal with cranks who were 



not cranks at all. In this catalog are to be numbered 
many of the world's great ones. 

Noah was voted a crank by his contemporaries ; 
but when the floods covered the face of the earth, 
the '"crank" was riding the waves in safety. The 
Israelites called Moses and Aaron ''cranks," but 
through their efforts was the Egyptian yoke thrown 
off. Jesus Christ was held to be a crank and 
worse ; nay, were He now on earth in bodily pres- 
ence, He would be in danger of consignment to the 
lunatic asylum. Yet the truths he taught will en- 
dure when the memory of the scoffer's existence is 
buried under the dust of aeons. 

At the beginning of the Renaissance, the list of 
cranks embraces the names of Luther, Savonarola, 
Calvin, Galileo, Columbus, and hundreds of others 
who aided gloriously in the unshackling of men's 
minds from the domination of error and darkness. 
Were not our Puritan forefathers cranks? What! 
would men leave the comforts of England, endure 
the uncertainties of exile, the hardships of pioneer- 
ing, all for the sake of an intangible thing called 
freedom of worship, be if sane? "No," replied the 
Conformist. Yet time has shown their deeds in the 
true light aud the world has reversed its judgment. 

Wilberforce and Howard, Garrison, Phillips and 
John Brown were denounced as cranks, visionaries, 
and worse. But tliey were, in truth, levers in the 
hands of the Eternal, through whom the mighty 
motive-power of love could be transmuted into 
action for the uplifting of down-trodden humanity. 
The history of all these great men should teach us 
to be more careful in our judgments. Let us be- 
ware of casting contempt on those whose moral aud 
spiritual preceptions are so far in advance of our 
own, that we are unable to comprehend their actions, 
although rising from the purest and loftiest motives. 



DECIDEDLY. 

A cute little miss, 

A sweet little kiss, 

It lasted only a minute. 

Then I took just one more 

From her plentiful store, 

When the maid boldly said : 

"You are in it." 



i6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 

The prospects of a bright year iu the anuals of 
the M. A. C. battalion seem to be very evident. As 
is usual in the fall term one's attention is more or 
less turned to the Freshman with a marked curiosity 
to decide how his presence is to affect the general 
bearing of the battalion, and certainly the well pro- 
portioned form of the average '96 man would seem 
to be an assurance of four good companies this 
season. 

But form and size cannot accomplish everything. 
There must be hard individual work during the drill 
hour and an evident interest on the part of every 
cadet to make the success of the department as 
great as possible. Lieut. Dickinson's interest is 
certainly centered in the battalion, for, having 
attended the institution two years, he is more or less 
acquainted with the necessities of the college and 
must have a sentiment entirely distinct from the 
man who is simply stationed here, feeling that he is 
obliged to spend three weary years in Amherst. 

Some perhaps think tliere should be no drilling 
here and argue that more good could be derived if 
the time were spent in study. They do not stop to 
consider how their physical condition will be bene- 
fited in the first three years of drilling, how their 
mental abilities will be trained as an officer iu senior 
year. TJiese things should not be overlooked, 
for there is no one here who does not admire a 
manly form or a read}' wit, both of which go a great 
ways toward a mau's future achievements. What- 
ever a student's judgment may be in regard to this 
matter, the drilling is required by the U. S. govern- 
ment and everj- able bodied man attending an agri- 
cultural college must take it. This being the case, 
it might just as easily be done with a will, and thus 
become an argument in favor of the institution. 
During commencement week, the battalion is one of 
the principal features. In fact, more people are 
present at the drill than at any of the other exer- 
cises. So it is plain to be seen what an advertise- 
ment a battalion of manly intellectual cadets may 
be at commencement, and on the other hand what 
an amount of discredit may be thrown on the insti- 
tution at a poor exhibition caused by indifference on 
the part of the men. 

Thus as we all have a lively interest in our col- 
lege, let us cooperate with the commandant in his 



efforts to bring about splendid results, and also with 
the various officers who should habitually bear in 
mind the significance of the duties which they are 
appointed to perform, and who should be persever- 
ing in their efforts to make a showing next com- 
mencement which shall be truly worthy of the M. 
A. C. 



THE WASHINGTON IRVING LITERARY 
SOCIETY. 

The meeting of the W. I. L. S. held Friday Sept. 
23 was fairly well attended but the debate was dull 
and showed lack of preparation. The question was, 
"Resolved that the Carnegie Steel Co. was justified 
iu bringing Piukertou detectives to guard its prop- 
erty." The points were mentioned but not ex- 
pressed as well as they should have been. The 
debaters should have more carefully prepared their 
parts as this question offers a wide field for thought. 
Question was decided in the affirmative. The meet- 
ing held Friday Sept. 30 was more largely attended 
and of a livelier character. Before the meeting 
closed, 3.5 men were present which is above the 
average showing. The debate was spirited and the 
points well brought out. The speakers, however, 
showed lack of prei)aration as in the previous meet- 
ing. The preparation of the parts should be more 
carefully attended to as it is well nigh impossible 
for a speaker to successfully cover his points with- 
out being fortified with well authenticated facts. 
The question was: "Resolved that the present 
laws n stricting immigration are sufficient." The 
debaters were : 1st aflf., D. C. Potter ; 1st ueg., F. 
A. Smith; 2d aff., H. J. Fowler; 2d neg., R. L. 
H ay ward ; 3rd aflT., C. H. Spaulding ; 3rd neg., A. 
H. Cutter. The debate was then thrown open to 
the house and was taken up and handled without 
restraint. The question was decided in the nega- 
tive. Kuroda gave an extemporaneous speech. 
The subject for the following meeting was decided 
upon and the question to be discussed is : "Resolved 
that a Republican Club should be formed in this 
college." Democrats and 3rd party men should turn 
out at this meeting as a lively time is expected. 
The names of Billings, Jones '96, Roper and H. E. 
Clark were proposed and voted upon and they were 
accepted as members. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



17 



FOOT-BALL. 
Trinity, 6 ; Aggie, 0. 

The first game of the season was played with 
Trinity, at Hartford, Saturday, Sept. 24. The work 
of Aggie shows that with hard practice a good team 
may be obtained. 

The game opened with Trinity's ball, they gain 
15 yards by the V, and by successive attempts 
throngh centre, put Hubbell over the line for a touch- 
down in four minutes, from which a goal is kicked. 
Aggie tries the V and gains to some extent, but 
soon loses the ball, both teams are now playing hard 
and prevent each other from scoring. Thus the 
first half ends with the score 6-0 in favor of Trinity. 

The second half is opened by Aggie gaining 12 
yards by the V, and is followed by a fine end run by 
Perry, Aggie gains slowly and when time is called 
has the ball at Trinity's 10-yard line, it having been 
in Trinity's territory from the start. This half was 
very short, allowing Aggie to catch the train. 

The work of Davis, Perry and Bagg behind the 
line was worthy of mention, also the playing of 
Tinoco at quarter. With a little stronger rush line 
we think Aggie will be able to do good work. The 
teams lined up as follows : 



trinity. 




AGGIE. 


WofifencTen, 


Right end, 


Mauley 


Hubbard, 


Right tackle. 


Henderson 


Perrose, 


Right guard, 


Boardman 


MoGann,- 


Centre, 


Howard, E. C. 


Allen, 


Left guard. 


Burrington 


Hartley, (Capt.) 


Left tackle, 


Davis, P. E. 


Strawbridge, 


Left end, 


Melendy 


Greely, 


Quarter-back, 


Tiuoco 


Hubbell, 


Right half-back, 


~(Capt.) Perry 


Edgerton, 


Left half-back, 


Bagg 


Diugwall, 


Full-back, 


Davis, H. C. 



Referee, Mr. Charles A. Goodrich. 
Umpire, Mr. Bulkley. 

Aggie, 28 ; Worcester Tech., 10. 

The eleven from W. P. I. was defeated on our 
campus last Saturday, the score being 28-10. 

At 3-25 the game was started, Tech. having the 
ball. Immediately Tech. was given 25 yards on 
account of a so-called foul tackle. Allen soon 
carried the ball across but Southgate failed to kick 
goal. Bagg and Perry by long runs succeeded in 
carrying the ball down the field, a touch-down was 
scored. No goal. Again our team advanced and 
Bagg scored a touchdown, but no goal was kicked. 
Tech. having the ball made 15 yards through the 
centre, and Allen taking the ball went round the 



end and secured a touchdown. At this attempt 
Southgate was successful in kicking a goal. The 
Aggies then gained by resorting to the V. Hender- 
son gained 15 yards and Bagg was pushed through 
the centre. Davis, H. C, carried the ball across 
the line and kicked a goal. Bagg now secured 
another touchdown for Aggie, and Melendy taking 
the ball advanced within 25 yards of Tech's goal- 
post when time was called. Score, 18-10. 

At the opening of the second half Tech seemed to 
wake up, and managed to keep the ball near the 
centre of the field, but Aggie taking the ball gained 
25 yards with the V and in another minute the ball 
was again "touched-down." Failed to kick goal. 
Tech made a gain of 10 yards, but fumbling lost the 
ball for them. Melendy by a long run crossed the 
goal line, but this was not allowed on account of a 
foul tackle and the bidl was carried back. Perry 
gradually gained ground and Melendy taking the 
ball secured a touchdown after another excellent 
run. Davis was successful in kicking goal. During 
the rest of the game ihe work was confined princi- 
pally to the centre of the field, neither side scoring. 

The principal playing of Tech. was by Allen, 
Southgate and Chase, and for our team the gains 
made by Perry, Bagg and Melendy were worthy of 
notice. The following was the make-up of the teams : 

AGGIES. TECHS. 



Manley, 
Henderson, 




Right end, left. 
Right tackle, left. 


Lincoln 
Hodgkins 


Boardman, 




Right guard, left. 


Brigham 


Howard, 
Burrington, 




Centre, 
Left guard, right. 


Rogers 
Brooks 


P. E. Davis, 




Left tackle, right. 


Ware 


Melendy, 
Tiuoco, 
Perry (Capt.) 
Bagg, 
Davis, 


} 


Left end, right, Butterfleld 
Quarter-back, Chase 

Half-backs, {X' and Cushman 
Full-back, Southgate 


Umpire, 


Charles Goodrich of Aggie. 




Referee, 


Prof. Rice of Tech. 





Y. M. C. A. TOPICS. 

Oct. 6. — Testimony Meeting. "For God so loved 

the World." I John 4 :13-15 ;Ps 119 :46. 

Joseph Baker. 
Oct. 9.— Abiding in Christ. John 15 :4-8. H. P. 

Smead. 
Oct. 13. — Reward of the Christian Life. Gen. 15:1; 

Rev. 3 :6. H. L. Frost. 
Oct.16.— Thou, God, seest me. Ps 139 :1-12. A. 

J. Morse. 



i8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^oHs^f I^o-ttS- 



—Where's the '95-'96 rope pull? 

— Belchertown cattle show to-morrow. 

— Stevens, '95 was at his home last week. 

— No foot-ball practice last week Tuesday. 

— The foot-ball patients are all convalescent. 

— Buy your furnishing goods of Blodgett & Clark. 

— Companies were formed Thursday, Sept. 29th. 

— The demerit system went into effect Monday, 
Sept. 2G. 

— The M. A. C. boarding club held an initiation 
last week. 

— The State Experiment Station is soon to issue 
a bulletin. 

— Davis, '93 injured his knee in a practice game 
last week. 

— Senior "quiz" in Veterinary last week under 
Dr. Paige. 

— The class of Niuety-six has recently adopted a 
constitution. 

—The Drill hall is to be closed at 8 P. M. until 
further notice. 

— F. A. and L. W. Smith, '93 attended the fair 
at Brattleboro. 

— Postponement of class trips seems to be the 
custom this year. 

— Several students attended the fair at Northamp- 
ton on Sept. 21st. 

— G. E. Taylor, '92, was present at the foot-ball 
game last Saturday. 

— Roper and Cook, '96 were absent from college 
a few days last week. 

— The band furnished music at the county fair, 
Wednesday, Sept. 28. 

— T. S. Bacon, '94, has just returned from a 
week's recess at home. 

— Dodge, '95 has changed his quarters from North 
College to Mrs. Clark's. 

— A. D. Hemenway, '95, spent a few days at his 
home in Barre, last week. 

— Prof. Walker addresses the Amherst Grange 
Friday evening, subject, "The Farmer's Movement 
in the North." 



— H. D. Clark, '93 has been home the past week, 
recovering from his illness. 

— Bartlett, '93 was away two days last week on 
account of a sprained ankle. 

— Dr. Wellington resumed his duties at the col- 
lege on Monday of last week. 

— E. J. Walker returned to his work on the 26th 
after an absence of over a week. 

— The students of North College are beginning to 
lay in their winter stock of coal. 

— Rev. G. E. Fisher of North Amherst occupied 
the college pulpit Sunday, Oct. 2. 

— A good delegation of the boys accompanied the 
team to Hartford on the 24th ult. 

— Dr. Goessmann and Prof. Brooks did not meet 
their classes last week Wednesday. 

— The work on the new buildings at the Botanic 
Department is progressing steadily. 

— The College had a large exhibit of stock at the 
Hampshire Agricultural Fair last week. 

— Prof, and Mrs. Maynard held a reception at 
their home, Wednesday, September 28. 

— Ninety- four has commenced laboratory work in 
zoology, under direction of Prof. Fernald. 

— The top mast of the flag staff had to be lowered 
last week in order to replace a broken lanj'ard. 

— Work was begun on the dam last Saturday. 
That begins to look like polo tlie coming winter. 

— The stoves of the North Dormitory were in- 
spected last Saturday by the Quartermaster and 
staff. 

— H. E. Crane, E. T. Clark, and R. P. Lyman, 
all of Ninety-two, have been visiting the college the 
last week. 

— Prof. Chas. S. Walker delivers an address be- 
fore the Worcester North-west Agricultural Fa^r, 
at Athol, this week. 

— H. M. Thomson, '91 has returned and begun 
his duties as assistant agriculturist at the Hatch 
Experiment station. 

— The M. A. C. Press Club has been organized 
with the following members: pres.,F. S. Hoyt ; 
sec'y and treas., C. F. Walker ;executive committee, 
T. S. Bacon, T. F. Keith, A. H. Kirkland, D. C. 
Potter. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



19 



— C. A. Goodrich, '93, has been elected president 
of the base-ball association, and P. E. Davis, '94. 
secretary and treasurer. 

— Officers of the athletic association for the year 
are: President, H. C. Davis, '93; secretary and 
treasurer, L. Manley, '94. 

— The Sophomore-Freshman foot-hall game occurs 
Oct. 11. The prospect is that there will be the 
usual enthusiasm exhibited bv both classes. 

— The N. H. S. is arranging for a camping out 
trip to Mt. Toby on Oct. 14-15. All students are 
invited to consult the President or Directors. 

-Pres. H. H. Goodell adresses the Wednesday 
Morning Club of Pittsfield this evening, subject, 
"Charitable Institutions ol the Middle Ages." 

— Why is not the new bell rung on Sundays? We 
have heard it strike, and now are anxiously listen- 
ing to hear its voice calling to Sunday services. 

— E. D. White, '94, was visited last week by his 
brother, who was on his way from North Carolina 
to Wesleyan University which he will enter this fall. 

— More men should present themselves on the 
campus for foot-ball practice. We cannot expect a 
good team unless they have good men to practice 
against. 

— Putnam, '94, was injured slightly, and H. E. 
Clark, '95, quite seriously iu the foot-ball practice 
of Sept. 20th. Davis, '94, has of late been playing 
left tackle. 

— The boundaries of the foot-ball ground have be en 
rather faintly outlined in former years, but they are 
now made more distinct, lime lines at 5 j'ard dis- 
tances being laid out. 

— A canvass of the Freshman class was recently 
made by the membership committee of the Y. M. 
C. A. and resulted in a fair increase in the active 
and associate membership of the associat'on. 

— The tennis association holds a tournament this 
week. While foot-ball takes up a great deal of col- 
lege athletic attention in the fall, it is hoped that 
all will cooperate to make this occasion a success. 

— The students were excused from the regular 
college exercises on Sept. 27th in order that they 
might attend the fair at East Amherst. Each student 
was supplied with a complimentary ticket for that 
date. 



— Dr. Goessmann was invited to attend the open- 
ing of the United States Food Exposition at Madi- 
son Square Garden, New York, Saturday evening, 
Oct. 1, in couneetion with the New York Columbian 
celebration. 

— The Walter Emerson Concert Company gave 
an entertainment in the Town Hall last Saturday 
evening. Quite a few students were in attendance 
and all expressed themselves as delighted with the 
performances. 

— The new library rule of imposing fines on men 
keeping books more than two weeks, proves to ac- 
complish all that was desired in its establishment. 
Every student has now an equal right in the library, 
and the old habit of retaining books a whole term 
is restricted. 

— The slowness with which the local tailors pro- 
vide themselves with a stock of uniform equipments 
makes it apparent that some one man shoulcj be con- 
sidered the college tailor. Then we might be able to 
obtain our straps and chevrons a few weeks at least 
before we are about to graduate. 

— Our foot-ball teams seems likely to suffer from 
a lack of interest among the students and the Cap- 
tain has hard work to get out men enough to prac- 
tice the college team. If the team is to play winning 
games this lall, enough men must get out to give 
the team thorough practice every day. 

— The following appointments have been made in 
the battalion: II. J. Harlow, '93 First Lieutenant 
and Quartermaster; F. S. Hoyt, '93 First Lieuten- 
ant and Fire Marshall. The change was made be- 
cause it was desirable to hnve for Fire Marshall a 
man that roomed iu one of the dormitories. 

— Monday, Oct. 3, the Freshmen elected the fol- 
lowing officers for the term : President, W. S. Pen- 
tecost ; vice-president, F. H. Read; secretary, W. 
J. Curley ; treasurer, R. L. Hay ward ; historian, 
Miss F. M. Vallentine ; class captain, H. C. Bur- 
riugton ; sergeant at arms, E. E. Kinsman. 

— The orchestra furnished music for the social 
dance held by Co. K in their armory last Wednes- 
day evening, and showed in their execution a de- 
cided improvement on last season's work. Consider- 
ing that this is very early in the year, it is fair to 
expect that this organization will meet with great 
success during the coming winter. 



20 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— It gives us great pleasure to aDnounce in this 
issue the election of T. P. Foley, '95 to the mem- 
bership of the Life board of Editors. He occupies 
the place left vacant by A. Davis leaving c<;llege. 

—The First Church Y. P. S. C.E. through the 
chairman of its Lookout committee has extended a 
cordial invitation to all meml)ers of the M. A. C. to 
attend and take part in the regular meetings of that 
society. 

— It was voted in the mass meeting al the begin- 
ning of the term that the treasurers of the various 
associations have their several reports published in 
the Life. Only two have thus far been forwarded 
and inquiry has here and there been made as to the 
tardiness. 

— The annual auction for the sale of the reading 
room newspapers and periodicals was held in the 
old chapel the evening of Sept. 26, and was highly 
successful financially. The attendance was large 
and general good nature prevailed. E. C. Howard, 
'93, with dignity becoming his position, acted the 
part of auctioneer. 

— Governor Russell, accompanied by General 
Dalton, visited the college last Wednesday while in 
town iittendiug the Agricultural Fair. He was met 
at the depot by President Goodell and Lieuts Dick- 
inson and Cornish. The customary salute of seven- 
teen rounds was given by the artillery squads at the 
college and an exhiliitiou of the bayonet drill by a 
portion of Co. B in his presence was apparently of 
interest to His Excellency. The different buildings 
and portions of the grounds were visited. In the 
afternoon in his address to the townspeople. Gov- 
ernor Russell expressed himself as very well pleased 

with the appearance and work of the College. 

^ 

He wrote on perfumed cards to her, 

(His letters were not few) 
And filled with loving phrases were 

Those dainty billet doux ; 
"My dearest love," they all begin, 

And close, "Your faithful Thomas — " 
And now they're being flaunted In 
A suit for breach of promise ! 

Columbia Spectator. 



Darkibus nightilus. 
No lightorum, 

Climbibus gatepost, 
Breechilus torum. 



Ex. 



A WORD FOR THE DEBATING CLUB. 

The attendance at the meetings of the W. I. L. 
S. this term has been small and it was noticeably so 
at the meeting held on Friday, Sept. 16. Even 
those few present displayed little or no interest in 
the proceedings. The President called upon at least 
four persons to take a vacant place on the debate 
and each one excused himself and declined to serve, 
after which the meeting was adjourned. 

This is deplorable. In a college of nearly one 
hundred and fortv students there ought to be enough 
men, interested in debate, to carry on successful 
meetings. It is not alone in getting prescribed les- 
sons that one is benefited by this College ; it is in 
the various societies, clubs and organizations, each 
of which exerts a distinct, powerful and peculiar 
influence upon the man. The training that one gets 
in these associations is of a different character from 
that obtained by studying on some given lesson and 
is of a mure practical nature. In the debating club 
the student meets men from all the classes, with all 
sorts of ideas and opinions, expressed with varying 
degrees of proficiency and effect. 

Some one has said, "It is in the sturdy clashing 
of mind against mind that the town meeting pre- 
serves its greatest power." And that is just what 
the student gets at the debating club. Coming in 
contact with men of various ideas and opinions, he 
improves in many ways ; habits of observation are 
developed ; the student is taught to ohserve the 
weak point in the argument of his adversary and 
this will be of use to him after graduation, in detect- 
ing the weak or dishonest part of any business 
investment he may be inclined to make. 

His power of thought is increased, because, for 
the successful maintenance of his position he is con- 
stantly obliged to think up new and different ways 
of presenting the question and favorable to his side 
of the debate. In exercising his privileges he gains 
confidence in himself and is not afraid to give his 
opinion when requested. 

He gradually becomes more expert in expressing 
himself, and it is perl)aps in this one particular that 
the debating club is of mos; benefit to the student 
for the business of life. How often have we seen 
men with good arguments or convictions tail in pro- 
ducing a desired effect, because those arguments 
were not brought forward in au able manner. No 



AGGIE LIFE. 



21 



matter what occupation a man maj' take up after 
graduation, lie will be more or less frequently called 
upon to express opinions or advance ideas and it 
behooves him to prepare to make a success of the 
same. If there is any one thing more than another 
that a graduate of this college should be able to do, 
it is to stand up in au assembly of his fellow-men 
and express his convictions, clearly, concisely and 
to the point. T. P. F. 

THE ELEVEN. 

Though early in the season the foot-ball team in 
most respects plays a strong game, but still shows 
weakness in blocking, and as a team they do not 
tackle low enough. 

The following is the crick-ism of the men who 
have played in the last two games : 

Center: E. C. Howard. He plays a hard game 
but often snaps the ball back with too much force ; 
tackles well, but wastes unnecessary strength fool- 
ing with his opponent. 

Guards : Boardman plays a hard, steady game, 
holds his man well, tackles finely, and rushes well. 
Burrington plays a strong game, but should lower 
his head in running. 

Tackles : P. E. Davis plays a good game, tackles 
well, but a little too high ; does not quite under- 
stand the game ; holds his head too high when 
rushing. Henderson plays well, rushes and tackles 
finely. 

Ends : Melendy plays a hard, quick game, tackles 
well, and blocks well. Manley plays a steady game 
but tackles a little high. 

Quarter-back : Tinoco throws the ball accurateh', 
tackles finely and is very quick. 

Half-backs: Bagg "bucks" centre finely, blocks 
well, but is still slow. He should take the ball 
while running. Gifford plays a hard game, tackles 
well but is slow in starting. 

Full-back : H. C. Davis blocks finely, "bucks" 
centre well, but tackles too high : punts finely. 

Captain Perry as half-back plays his position 
better than ever, which is saying a good deal. He 
has the confidence of the men, and also their 
cooperation. 

It is encouraging to see the team make such a 
showing thus early in the season, and to observe 
how faithfully the men practice every day, but it is 
extremely discouraging to the players not to have 



more men out to practice against them. That a 
man is not on the first eleven now, is not saying 
that he will not be before the end of the season. 
Competition for positions is what brings up the 
quality of a team, in nine cases out of ten. So 
boom the eleven all you can, and cooperate to the 
fullest extent with those interested in the success of 
the foot-ball season, and happy results will surely 
follow. 



The New Hampshire Agricultural College has in 
its entering class one young lady who intends to 
take the complete course. 



Bull, the famous Yale full back will coach the 
Yale foot-ball candidates every morning and the 
Wesleyan candidates in the afternoon. 



The phonograph is neuter etymologists will say, 

But I beg to talce exception, and will show you clear as 

day. 
They are utterly mistaken, for though life it still may 

lack, 
It surely must be feminine, for it's always talking back. 



Schillare's 
Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PEOMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIN STnXlET, 



NOMTHAMBTOlf, MASS. 



22 



AGGIE LIFE. 



umni ^otfs. 



The M. A. C. Alumni Club of Mass. will hold its 
annual meeting at 11 a. m., the second Tuesday in 
October, at the office of Lhe Secretary of the Board 
of Agriculture, No. 11 Mt. Vernon St., Boston. The 
annual dinner of this club will be held in November. 

Dr. .J. E. Root, '76, clerk of the Hartford County 
Medical Association, delivered the historical ad- 
dress at the ] lOth anniversary of that society held 
at Hartford, Conn., Sept. 26. 

EIGHTY-SEVEN. 

A. L. DeAlmeida, Agenda des Tres Barros, 
Barvanal de Sao Canlo, Brazil, Coffee Planter. 

E.W.Barrett, 331 Main St., Milford, Mass., 
Teacher. 

W. A. Caldwell, State College, Penn., Asst. 
Agricultiirlist in Experiment Station and Instructor 
in Agr. State College. 

F. B. Carpenter, Raleigh, N. C. Asst, Chemist 
Experiment Station. 

Wm. PI Chase, 170 1-2 Second St., Portland, 
Ore., Contractor and Builder. 

F. A. Davis, M. D., 176 Charles St., Boston, 
Mass., House Surgeon, Mass. Charitable Eye and 
Ear Infirmary. 

C. W. Fisherdick, Lincoln, Neb., Lawyer, Web- 
ster, Rose, and Fisherdick. 

E. R. Flint, Ph. D., Boston, Mass. 

F. H. Fowler, Commonwealth Building, Boston, 
Mass.. First Clerk, Office State Board of Agrl. 

C. S. Howe, Marlborough, Mass., Farm and 
Greenhouse. 

J. M. Marsh, 393 Chestnut St., Lynn, Mass., 
Travelling Salesman, Geo. E. Marsh & Co., Soap 
Manuf. 

C. L. Blarshall, 485 Stevens St., Lowell, Mass., 
Market Gardener and Florist. 

T. F. B. Meehan, 169 Green St., Jamacia Plain, 
Mass., Law Student. 

J. C. Osterhout, VVestford,Mass.,P. 0. Nashoba, 
Farmer. 

E. F. Richardson, Millis, Mass., Farmer. 

H. N. W. Rideout, Boston, Mass., Clerk Pay- 
master's Office, Fitchburg depot. 



W. N. Tolman, Boston. Mass., 39 Court St., 
Civil Engineer. 

F. de S. Torelly, Cidsde do Rio Grande, do Sul, 
Brazil, Stock Raiser. 



INTERCOLLEGIA TE. 

Princeton has over 300 freshmen this year. 
Brown has added military instruction to its cur- 
riculum. 

Tufts opens with 72 freshmen including four 
young ladies. 

In the women's college at Brown University there 
are 45 3'oung ladies. 

Smith College now has over 700 students, 651 in 
the college proper and 50 in the art school. 

Tuition in the Chicago University will cost §25 
per term. Chapel attendence is compulsory. 



INSTRUCTOR IN' 



Is now forming a class in dancing for M. A. C. men. There will be 
an advanced division for those who can dance already, in which the 
latest dances will be taught. For terms inquire at ray Hall. 

4®"Members of my former classes as well as the present ones 
can obtain admission cards to the Receptions by applying at the Hall. 
Residence and Hai-I-. Dickinson's Block. 



8TUDEKTS' SUPPLIES. 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONEEY OF 

ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 

GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 

FIRST CLASS GOODS. FBICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH college:. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-OperatiYe Steam Laimdry^i^ 

and Carpet Reoovatiii Establislimeiit. 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



23 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 

BeaJiiiiaftBrs M Sfijint's Siipiies. 

" Lamps and Laiiip Goods are Ours." 

WIIiIiIAMS' BLOCK, AMMERST, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY, FEED ^J SALE STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

A.MHEBST, JUASS. 



J. A. RAWS 



DEALER IN 



WflTGHES, CLOCKS, JEtfEIiRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

PIHS STiiTIOHERY. 
REPAIRING NEATLY AMD ROIVIPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



'Y" 



P 



, I \ ' I 



H 



H 




.A.3VEia:EE,ST, 



i«fl:A.ss. 



The total membership of Greek letter societies in 
American Colleges is estimated at 77,000. 

Plans have already been drawn up for enlarging 
the grand stand at Springfield, where the Harvard- 
Yale game will be played. The seating capacity 
will be increased from 20,000 to 25,000. 

At Jackson, Mich., Se[)t. 1, occurred the death of 
Rev. \V. H. Withington, Harvard's oldest graduate. 
He was 94 years of age and graduated from Harvard 
in the class of 1821 with Ralph Waldo Emerson. 

Carl Bothne, who attracted considerable attention 
last season by his phenomenal work on the Williams 
College foot-ball eleven, and who was expected to 
fill Heffelfinger's place on the Yale eleven, died re- 
cently. 

Prof. G. S. Burroughs, pastor of the college 
church at Amherst, has accepted the presidency of 
Wabash College. He graduated at Princeton in 1873 
and is widely known as an authority on Biblical lit- 
erature. 



NOTICES: 

Mails leave the college for the post-office at 1 p. m. and 
7-40 P. M. on week days. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Springfield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 p. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massa- 
chusetts, 7-45, 10-45, A. M. 4- 00, 6-45 p. M. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-45 a. 
M. 4-06, 6-45 P. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 45, 8-30 P. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. m. 

The President will be at his office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 3 to 5 
p. M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the term. 

The college library will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m. and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 

The museum of natural history will be open to 
visitors from 4-30 to 5-30 p. m. Mondays, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays ; from 3 to 4 p. m. Wednesdays, 
and Fridays. Will be closed Saturdays and 
Sundays. 



24 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes! Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 

P=-^C3-E'S SHOE STOKE, 
t^t'iijIjI.a.IvIS' block:. 

Slieet Music, 



Mnsic Books, 
Strings 

FOR the: violin, banjo, guitar, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



.A.]S^ia:E)RST. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 



,.(j DENTISTS. 5).. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CJTTZEJt'S BLOCK, AMX[JEItST,«mA.SS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
9 A.. IS^. TO 5 "£>. Is/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GrOOD WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



JPHTSICIAlfS' phescbiftions carefvli^t 
cosrpoTjyDBD, 

MORGAN'^PHARMACY, 

6 PHCENLS ROW. 

Order your CrO^Ei here. 

WILL FIXD STUDENT HE.4J>QUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



ODGETT & CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



Far Suite and Fall Dvercoats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK, 



FINE ITAL AND FAIENCE LAIPS, 



B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, §2.00, §2.50 and $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O. G= COUcH & SON'S= 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseau, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass^ . 



r± u 



H 



H 



FRESK SMH FIITB. 



DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



^^■Etlier and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T THE 



JEUEL'S DRU(j S 

Amherst House Block, 




Amtierst lass, 



HENRY J^nJ^'MS, 



no. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drugs and Medicmes, 

PANCT AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 



1892. 



THE 


PHOTD EM1.FHER. 


NEINA/ 
ENLARGED 


SKY LIGHT. 
OPERATING ROOM. 


€LASS AND 


SOCIETY ©ROUPS A SPECIALTY 



AMHERST^ GASH SHOE %WRh 

You can get the most lor your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



A. GLYNN, 



\ 



4T A 1 LP R. r 

Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleajting and Pressing a Specialty. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



JVIilitapy Suits and Trimmings. 



Massachusetts Aaricultural Colleae, 




A-ixilierst, ;Ma^«ss. 



\'Y . r • i^V^-lTTK^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AMHERBT, MRBS., OCT. IB, 1B52. 



VOL. III. Nn. a. 



^arp^n*t^r fit Mor^hous?, 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, acjdress. 

Prof. S, T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS. 



THE ABIHERST 





uARPET 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES. I'lLLO Wg, STUDY 
DESKS AN D CHAI RS, LOUNGES. 

WINDOW SHADES , DRAPERIES. 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



C. H. SANDERSOf(& CO., 

CASB DEALERS IH 

FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



SylNDEpit & THOMPSOf(, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES, 



KEFA-IIill^O I30I^E: FH.OJVrFTL.'^. 



All Goods STH,ICTL-Z CASH and at 
LOWEST PHICES. 

E. D. JMARSH, 



10 PHOENIX ROW. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



T, W. SLOAN. 

8 rMfEXJX HOW. 



S. A. 




STEAA\ AND GAS FJTTER. 



A Large Stock of Rauges, Ileatiug Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furuace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heating a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBER 19, 1892. 



No. 3 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Asrricultural Collea;e. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as secoud-clasamail matter. 

BOJlMD of MDITORS: 

G. F. CUELEY, '93, Editor-in-Chief, 

J. E. PEEET, '93, Business Manager, 

E. C. HOWAED, '93, P. S. HOTT, '93, 

A. E. MELENDT, '93. C. F. WALKEE, '94, 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F, KEITH, '94, 

T. P. FOLEY, '95. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



4V*?tU"(t^ V \\^%t*?i^i5.t., ?W>k'\t^a. 



rials. 



The committee appointed at the Mass Meeting to 
consider tlie advisability of adopting a college but- 
ton have reported that a good article can be ob- 
tained at a reasonable figure. As there is a gener- 
al desire for a button, the committee will soon make 
a canvass of the college and an opportunity given 
every student for securing one. It is not neces- 
sary to discuss here why all that can possibly do so, 
should obtain these buttons, as its universal use 
among college students shows its popularity. We 
can only urge that all co-operate to make the move- 
ment a success. 



Pkepaeations are being made by committees of 
the townspeople and colleges for a Columbian cele- 
bration, to be held at the town hall Friday evening, 
Oct. 21. It is expected that the students of both 
colleges will co-operate to the best of their ability 
to make the event a success. The military organi- 
zations of the town will be represented, and the 
speakers to take part are residents of Amherst. 



Friday is a national holiday and it is but fitting that 
the students of the Massachusetts Agricultural col- 
lege, a state institution, should evince their inter- 
est by attending. 



In view of the fact that students, especially fresh- 
men, are liable to circulate among their friends at 
home exaggerated reports of little incidents com- 
mon to college life, a few words of warning may be 
timely. In the first place, that students have a won- 
derful capacity for manufacturing stories any one 
acquainted with college life well knows ; and fur- 
thermore the student often finds it necessary in re- 
lating the circumstances to use his ingenuity in en- 
larging upon the episode. While in manj- cases these 
little incidents would soon be forgotten, occasional- 
ly a person rec';ives from them a wrong im.ression 
which may result in serious consequences. So let 
us be on the safe side and in our conversation and 
correspondence restrict ourselves to what can have 
no possible tendency to injure the good name of our 
institution. 

Once more the weary mind of the college student 
finds the impenetrable gloom of lecture-room and 
study pierced by a few scant rays of sunlight in the 
anticipation of another holiday. It matters not 
how interesting or how attractive the narrow path 
of learning may be to the college man, he soon 
wearies of the monotony of life, and longs for a 
respite — for a whole day perhaps, free from college 
duties ; a whole day when neither the chapel bell 
nor the rattle of the drum shall sound its relentless 
summons on his ear. Then it is that his whole be- 
ing is pervaded with a joyous sense of freedom, and 
he lays aside for a time all thoughts of the text- 
book, and experiences some of the joys of life. 
The true American holiday is nowhere more appre- 
ciated than in the true American college, and the 
student knows how to make the most of it. 



26 



AGGIE LIFE. 



To-DAT Aggie meets Williston on the foot ball 
field for the first time since the fall term of 1889. 
Previous to that time there had always been great 
rivalrj' in sports between these two institutions, and 
so intense did the feeling become that ungentleman- 
ly conduct on the part of some made it imperative 
that athletic intercourse between the two institutions 
be ceased. After many fruitless attemjjts Willis- 
ton has succeeded in arranging a game with us, and 
if friendly contests can be held, it will be an ad- 
vantage to our teams to play them. In former 
years the Williston-Aggie games were the most in- 
terestmg ones of the season and were always eager- 
ly awaited. There is no reason why this state of 
affairs cannot exist again, no reason whatever why 
rivalry should touch upon enmity. Let us, at least, 
resolve that we give Williston no cause for com- 
plaint as to our conduct at these games. 



The Sophomore-Freshman foot ball game of last 
Wednesday accomplished its object ; the superiority 
of the one was verified. But this contest demon- 
strated as markedly as usual the unadvisability of 
indulging in class games at this college. We are 
not a large enough institution. All the spirit a 
man here has in sports should be concentrated in 
the college team, and all his energy should be de- 
voted to making that team a success. Although 
new material is brought out in class games, our 
best athletic interests cannot sanction them for the 
reason that a great risk is incurred by allowing 
good men to lay themselves liable to injury, and 
that too, when there is so little athletic reputation at 
stake. Class contests are allowable and commend- 
able just so far as they do not hurt the college 
teams. If good men are to be disqualified in class 
games, if the daily practice of the college team is 
to be interfered with in the preparation for these 
games, then far better would it be to abolish them. 



Although foot ball has been the form of athletic 
sport in which Aggie students have excelled, until 
the present time we have never had a trainer to 
bring out the latent strength and capabilities of the 
men ; but at last the desired end for which we have 
waited so long has been attained. The manage- 
ment and the team are to be congratulated upon 
havingsecured the services of such a capable and en- 



thusiastic man as Dr. .Seelye. He needs no intro- 
duction to Aggie men, as his brilliant work as half 
back on Stagg's famous elevens of '90 and '91 is 
distinctly remembered !)y all vvho were in college at 
that time. He has the faculty of imparling to the 
men under his charge a snap and vim which is 
truly refreshing, and from this time on, his semi- 
weekly visits to the college and the team will be 
looked forward to by all lovers of foot-ball in the 
college. The team already shows more life, and 
the benefits of his coaching cannot be doubted. 
Now that the ice has been broken we hope that the 
precedent established by the foot-ball management 
of '92 will become a custom among us, and that not 
only in loot-ball will we have the benefits of a com- 
petent coach, but also that the base-ball manage- 
ment of next spring, as well as that of succeeding 
years, will have a man on the ground who will train 
our athletes in such a way that they will be a credit 
and honor to the college. 



The recent trip of the class of Ninety-four sug- 
gests the old query '"do class trips pay?" and we 
hear the arguments which have been gone over 
hundreds of times, rehearsed both pro. and con. 
Is the benefit derived great enough to overbalance 
the breaking up of continuous work? Do the stu- 
dents interest themselves enough in what they see 
to repay them for this cessation of study ? Do they 
not come back with minds farther away from books 
and lecture-room than when they went away? It 
is our opinion that such trips most emphatically do 
pay for the time and money expended. "Much 
study is a weariness to the brain," and -'of making 
of books there is no end," says the wise man. 
Hence, if we can get away from the routine work of 
study for a few days, and in a way which is pleas- 
urable as well as instructive, see the practical appli- 
cation of the methods and processes of which we 
are taught the theory in the class and lecture-room, 
and at the same time broaden out the mind by ob- 
servation which is not directly associated with 
scientific study, then the mind has a rest and re- 
ceives new stimulus to perform the work which is 
required in college duties. What before has seemed 
uninteresting and hum- drum takes on a new inter- 
est, theories become realities, and the maximum 
benefit is obtained. By all means let these class 



AGGIE LIFE. 



27 



trips be continued, and by this observation of meth- 
ods and appliances, more al)le and broader minded 
men will be sent out from the walls of our institu- 
tion. 



^©n-tributed. 



Q. E. D. 

Said the Freshman to the Senior, 

"Teach me how j'ou tackle so, 
I play half for Alma Mater, 

Should I not this knowledge know?" 
Then the Senior — mighty end'sman 

Seemd to think of long ago, 
For his voice filled with emotion 

As he spoke in accents low — 

"To the beaches just meander, 

Drive a horse and sport a yacht, 
Show your V's and don your blazer. 

Then you'll take like Admiral Dott; 
Get engaged to a shapely maiden, 

Take the fairest of the lot, 
Soon you'll learn just how to tackle ; 

Tackle hard, but marry not." 

Freshman followed out these precepts. 

Was engaged for a month or more ; 
Then in fall went back to college. 

Played the same place as before. 
Now he tackles like the Senior, 

Somewhat different than before ; 
For the waist is tackled neatly 

As if at the seashore. 



THE SPEECH OF MONKEYS. 

Under this title there has just been placed in the 
library a little book which will be most entertaining 
reading for any one whether especially interested in 
the subject or not. Prof. Garner, the noted simian 
philologist, is the author and he has treated his sub- 
ject in an exceedingly interesting and instructive 
manner, the more so because it is the first as well 
as the latest book that has ever been written on this 
subject. We hope and believe however ihat it is 
not to be the last but that the question thus happily 
opened for discussion by Prof. Garner will receive 
that attention, which in the light of its relations to 
modern physical science and evolutionary investiga- 
tion, it certainly deserves. 

The primary aim of the author has been to prove 
to the somewhat prejudiced public mind : first, that 



the lower animals, more especially monkeys and 
kindred tribes, have the power of speech, of a very 
inferior and rudimentary type of course but never- 
theless just as truly speech as our own ; and second, 
that it is possible for man to learn these languages 
and thus be able to commanicate more or less per- 
fectly with some of the higher types at least of the 
animal kingdom. 

In Part I the author has given records of various 
experiments he has performed which illustrate his 
methods of work and go to prove the two points 
mentioned above. Throughout his studies Mr. 
Garner has made prominent and frequent use of the 
phouogra[)h iu order to record the sounds of different 
animals in such form that they would be available 
for further study and analysis. He would often 
repeat these recorded sounds in the hearing of other 
animals of the same and different species and 
observe the effect. In this way he learned as the 
result of numerous observations that the different 
monkey tribes and species had different languages 
or dialects, correspondingly as the different human 
races and tribes have each their peculiar language 
or dialect. He also learned that monkeys of one 
species were unable, upon first association, to under- 
stand the language of another species ; but that 
when associated for a short time, they soon learned 
to understand each other although it was very rare 
indeed that one attempted to speak the language of 
the other. One of his most frequent experiments 
was to repeat a sound he had learned from one 
monkey, to another of the same species and almost 
invariably the second monkey would show unmis- 
takable evidence of recognizing the word and appre- 
hending its meaning. 

In Part II, the author gives various deductions 
and theories which he has made from his experi- 
ments thus far, and in chapter V he discusses the 
particmlar characteristics which mark the sounds of 
monkeys as speech, as distinguished from mere 
sound. He does not however claim to have dis- 
cussed the subject at all deeply or thoroughly as yet 
for his work thus far can be considered as scarcely 
more than a beginning. 

Since editing his book Prof. Garner has started 
for Africa where he intends to pursue his studies 
among the monkeys in their native haunts. For 
this purpose he has had prepared an iron cage which 



28 



AGGIE LIFE. 



he will transport to the heart of the wilderness. In 
this he intends to live and by the aid of photographic 
and phonographic instruments to study the habits 
and speech of the monkey race, particularly of the 
larger apes and gorillas. If his simian friends get 
too familiar or inquisitive he has planned electrical 
means by which to shock them into submission. 

The study of comparative phdology is at once 
admitted to be the most important means of tracing 
the relations and descent of the different races of 
man and in the same way Prof. Garner believes that 
a thorough study of the simian dialects will do much 
to throw light on many mooted questions that are 
continually being discussed by evolutionists and 
their opposers. Altogether the professor is au en- 
thusiast in his line and is full of new and surprising 
theories which, though distasteful perhaps to some, 
make his book so full of instruction and entertain- 
ment as to well repay one for the time spent in 
reading it. 



dinner table and while being escorted about the 
grounds. A barge ride of eight miles brought the 
class to Concord, where Hartwell's was visited. 
This ride was of great interest for on the way were 
seen places of historical and literary renown : Haw- 
thorne's "House of Seven Gables," the home of 
Louisa M. Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson's home, 
the Thoreau house, Hawthorne's birthplace, and 
the "Concord bridge." On the other side of the 
bridge the class gathered around the monument and 
gave the class yell for "the minute men of 1775." 
At Concord the class was divided, some leaving for 
Amherst while the rest spent another day in Boston, 
so Ninety- four's class trip virtually ended in this 
historic old town. The class feels that the success 
and pleasure of its trip are due almost wholly to the 
efforts and ijiterest of Professor Maynard, and to 
him the class renders its heartiest thanks. 



JUNIOR CLASS TRIP. 

After several postponements "Ninety-four" has 
at last taken the Junior class trip. As in former 
years the purpose of this trip was to see put into 
practice what has been studied in theory in the class 
room. Thursday, October 6, nearly every member 
of the Junior class, accompanied by Professor May- 
nard, started for their two days' trip. The first 
place visited was the "Waban Conservatories" at 
Natick, where nearly four acres of roses were grow- 
ing under glass. A short ride in the barge brought 
the class to Hunnewell's Gardens at Wellesley. 
Here were fine collections of orchids and rhododen- 
drons and among other points of iiiteiest were the 
celebrated Italian gardens, perhaps the most noted 
in the country. On the way to the station the 
grounds of Wellesley College were visited but owing 
to the limited time, the buildings proved the chief at- 
traction. At Boston the class met at Horticultural 
Hall where there was a very fine exhibit of fruits 
by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. After 
this the class broke up into small parties, many vis- 
iting the Mechanics' Fair. The various theatres of 
the city were also well patronized. Friday morning 
the extensive market gardens of W. W. Rawson, at 
Arlington, were visited. The class especially ap- 
preciated the courtesy of Mr. Rawson both at the 



SOPHOMORE MOUNTAIN DAY. 

The unusual excitement at the Botanic Museum 
on Tuesday, Oct. 4 was occasioned by the prepar- 
ation for the annual botanizing trip of the Sopho- 
more Class. Mt. Toby and Sugar Loaf were de- 
cided upon as the objective [loints and at 8.16 a. m. 
the members of the class of '95 set out in one of 
Paige's barges. The weather was not promising but 
the day proved to be an exci-llent one before noon. 
The object of the trip was to study plants in their 
native fastnesses and to obtain such specimens as 
might be encountered on the way. 

After a hilarious ride to the foot of Mt. Toby the 
horses were put up and the party started up tlie 
mountain on foot. The top was i cached at about 
1-SO o'clock and after enjoying the magnificent 
scenery and a bountiful repast they started for the 
"cave." This they found with some difficulty but 
the uniqueness and strangeness of the place proved 
it to be well worth the trouble of finding. At this 
place the class had an exciting adventure with a 
member of the Felis Concolor family, or what is 
commonly called a "painter." It proved, however, 
to be some members of the class who had gone 
ahead and were testing their powers of mimicry. 

The party then entered the barge and were taken 
to the foot of Mt. Sugar Loaf. They ascended by 
the path which leads up the mountain on the south- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



29 



west side and were soon gazing at the beautiful val- 
ley below them. 

After the hard days tramp the barge was again a 
welcome sight and at last we were en route for 
"Aggie." All too quickly did the day pass and 
when evening came the party was tired and hungry 
but happy. Many interesting finds were made 
among which were about twenty-five specimens of 
the fruit of the GitncUus vulgaris and the Cucumis 
melo. Several varieties of the Signus Waysideria 
also accompanied the class on its homeward jour- 
ney. The trip was on the whole a thoroughly en- 
joyable one and will long be remembered by the 
class of '95. 



FOOT-BALL. 
Amheest, 4 ; Aggie 0. 

The second game of the Amherst-Aggie series 
took place upon the college campus the llth, and 
the match was won by Amherst at the last moment. 
Both teams were highly surprised at the result of 
the game, Amherst because she had beaten us so 
badly the week before aad had selected her best 
team to meet us again and Aggie because four of 
her line were under the weather, and the substitutes 
had never before played a college game. Amherst's 
team was fully 1-4 heavier than the home team, and 
played their accustomed good blocking game, but 
the team work of Aggie told hard against them. 

Aggie opened the game at 3.45, having the ball 
and immediately gained 10 yards by the V. 
Throughout the half the playing was sharp and 
hard, and confined to the center of the field. Just 
previous to the close of the half with the ball at the 
35 yd. line Amherst punted; but before play was 
again called the half ended. 

At the opening of the second half Amherst start- 
ed with V, and gradually worked down the field, 
but were slowly driven back and in an unsuccess- 
ful punt lost the ball. The playing after this was 
desperate, each side striving to make a point. A 
long run by Amherst carried the ball close to Aggie 
territory and Capt. Pratt was pushed across. On 
account of a question as to the legality of the touch- 
down no goal was tried for, and soon time was 
called. 

The running, tackling and interference of both 
teams was noticeable and the game abounded with 



snap and interest throughout. Aggie played four 
substitutes, but they played well. For Amherst her 
backs carried off the honors, and for Agsie Baas, 
Boaidman and Perry excelled in playing. The 
teams lined up as follows : 

AMHERST. 

Rosa, 

Baldwin, 

Haskell, 



POSITION, 

left-end-risht 



AGGIE. 

Putnam, Manley, 
left-tackle-rlglit Higgins, I.C. Green 
left-guard. right Boardman, 



Edgell. Penne.v, center Howard, 

Caiithers, right-guard-left Burrlngton, 

Nourse, right-tackle-left P. E. Davis, 

Van Leuveu, riglit-eud-left Drury, 

G. D. Pratt, quarter-ljack Tinoco, Putnam, 

Goodale, Ellis, half-backs Perry, (Capt.,) Bagg, 

H. L. Pratt, (Capt.,) full-back H. C. Davis, 

Umpire— Goodrich, '93. Referee— Gould, Amherst. 
Time— 45m. 

«lQfr^ 

TSE WASHINGTON IRVING LITERARY 
SOCIETY. 
The regular meeting of the VV. I. L. S. held Fri- 
day evening, Oct. 7, was not very well attended, 
due in part to the absence of the Juniors from Col- 
lege at that time. The question : Resolved that a 
Republican Club should be formed in this College, 
was discussed. There having been no principal 
debaters appointed owing to the quality of the ques- 
tion, the discussion was at once thrown open to the 
house, and the following took part : R. L. Hayward, 
A. 8. Kinney and W. L. Morse, in behalf of the 
affirmative, and E. A. Hawker, E. H. Henderson, 
F. T. Harlow and F. H. Henderson in behalf of the 
negative. The merits of the question were decided 
by vote in favor of the negative. The debate 
showed little preparation and was consequently dis- 
interesting. The debate one week later was 
of a very different character ; the debaters showed 
intelligent preparation in most cases, and presented 
an entertainment in which all were interested. The 
question for discussion was, Resolved that the Col- 
umbian Exposition should not be closed on Sundays. 
The debaters were: 1st aff., F. S. Hoyt : 1st neg., 

E. A. Hawks ; 2nd aff., R. L. Hayward ; 2nd neg., 
H. F. Staples ; 3d aff., H. D. Hemenway ; 3rd neg., 

F. H. Henderson. The debate was then thrown 
open to the house and was handled in an able man- 
ner. The weight of argument and merits of the 
question were both decided in favor of the affirma- 
tive side. Two new members, F. L. Wairen and 
H. T. Edwards were elected. 



30 



AGGIE LIFE. 



follc;^^ JSSotfS- 



— The bandstand is again in use. 

— Sellew, '96 was visited by bis father last week. 

— Students are laying in their winter's store of 
apples. 

— There is a jingle of cash, day and night at the 
library. 

— A. R. Streeter, ex-'94 made a visit to the col- 
lege last week. 

—Alderman, '94 and .Jones, '96 spent a few days 
at home last week. 

— H. B. Read, '95, went home last Saturday on 
account of sickness. 

— Keith, '94 returned from his market gardening 
tour last Wednesday. 

— The foot-ball team meets Williston on our cam- 
pus this afternoon at 3 o'clock. 

— There are forty Amherst men competing for 
positions on the Student board. 

— Work on the new buildings at the botanic de- 
partment is progi-essiug rapidly. 

— A large and patriotic crowd accompanied the 
team to Worcester last Saturday. 

— John the peanut man finds the season's trade 
on the Aggie campus quite profitable. 

— Last Saturday several of the students went to 
the Worcester-Tech game on bicycles. 

■ — Quite a delegation from the college attended 
the Republican rally last Thursday evening. 

— The work of the orchestra is giving entire sat- 
isfaction this fall and a busy season is expected. 

— Why not make use of the cannon Columbus 
Day in honor of the great discoverer of America? 

— At a meeting of the M. A. C. Press Club held 
Oct. 12, a constitution was drawn up and adopted. 

— The juniors returned from their trip to Boston 
in good spirits and with a large stock of new ideas. 

— Base-ball practice was indulged in quite a little 
last week. '96 seems to have some promising mate- 
rial. 

— The tennis tourni.ment games are coming off 
slowly. No man should allow liis procrastination to 
keep back the finals. 



— There was comparatively little excitement con- 
nected with the class game compared to what has 
taken place in former times. 

— Rev. Wallace McMullen of the Methodist 
church, Springfield, occupied the pulpit last Sunday 
in exchange with Dr. Walker. 

— The latest addition to the library is "Anhyd- 
roorthosulfanunbenzoesaiire, an intensely interest- 
i:.g work which we can recommend to all. 

— There has been quite an audience on the cam- 
pus watching the foot-ball practice the last few 
days. May the interest never grow less. 

— The Freshmen are now being instructed in 
the manual of arms and will soon be well enough 
prepared so that company drill can be the order. 

— Tuesday, Oct. 11 : Amherst, 4 ; Aggie, 0. This 
certainly shows improvement upon the game of the 
Wednesday before which resulted in a score of 58- 
10. 

— Target practice is now in order in the military 
department. A detail from the battalion goes down 
to the target each drill hour, in charge of tiie Fire 
Marshal. 

— Ninety-six seems to be well supplied with 
base-ball material in the way of players and the 
interest in this division of our athletics is not likely 
to decrease. 

— Application for the two vacancies in the Glee 
Club are not very numerous. Modesty should not 
prevent anyone who can sing from trying for the 
desirable position. 

— Since our last issue the Freshman class has 
challenged the Sophomores to a rope-pull to be held 
the 28th inst. Ninety-five has accepted and a live- 
ly time may be espectd. 

— The dam is progressing slowly but steadily and 
the piles of materials and extensive preparations 
denote a structure that will hold water and be orna- 
mental at the same time. 

— The Board of control of the State Agricultural 
Experiment Station held its regular quarterly meet- 
ing at the Station, Oct. 11. Among other matters 
of business, Pres. H. H. '^-ioodell was chosen dele- 
gate to represent the station at the meeting of the 
Association of American Agricultural Colleges and 
Experiment Stations to be held at New Orleans, La., 
Nov. 15. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



31 



— Prof. James E. Humphrey will remain at the 
State Experiment Station until January. He will 
then sail for Jamaica where he is to spend the win- 
ter studying the tropical vegetation of the Island. 

— The college is pleased to see Prof. Warner once 
more able to assume a part of his duties. The 
Sophomores seem to have monopolized him thus far 
but the other classes hope to be soon honored again 
by his services. 

— Last Friday evening several of the students at- 
tended a huslviug parly at "OIlie" Cowles', South 
Deerfield. Immediately after the husking refresh- 
ments were served and the remainder of the evening 
was spent in dancing. 

— The prospectus for the Amherst College lecture 
course, season of 1<S92 — 3, has been issued and 
announces an unusually interesting series of enter- 
tainments. A large number of M. A. C. students 
are expecting to attend. 

— Foot-b:ill is booming and the number and ex- 
cellence of the games played upon the campus is 
, evidence of the good condition of the team and its 
management. Now let us back them up with good 
attendance at the games. 

— Tinoco, '93 received quite a serious injury in 
the last Amherst-M. A. C. game. Two ligaments 
in the right knee were broken and he will probably 
not be able to play again for some time. His loss 
is severely felt by the team. 

— Drury, '95, sustained a severe injury last 
Wednesday in the Sophomore-Freshman game. The 
trouble lies in the knee, and will probably prevent 
his playing again for some time. Great things were 
expected of him as left end. 

— The creak of the pulley-block is often heard 
around North College as the baskets of coal go sail- 
ing merrily up to the roof but the weary man on the 
end of the rope and the blackened toiler in the 
fourth story are glad when the job is done. 

— The following directors of the college Associa- 
tions have been elected from the Freshman class : 
Athletic director — H. C. Burrington. 
Foot-ball " — F. P. Washburn. 
Base-ball '• — W. J. Curley. 
Tennis " — E. J. Greene. 

Reading Room " — G. A. Hubbard. 



— A. Davis, ex-'95 has a position in the Inspec- 
tion Department of the Associated Factory Mutual 
Insurance Companies, located at 31 Milk Street, 
Boston, Mass. Mr. Davis intends to make a short 
visit to the college in the course of a month. 

— All who wish to take a pleasant outing should 
watch the bulletin board for the trips of the Natural 
History society. Pleasant weather and good com- 
pany combine to make the tramps very enjoyable 
while the object in view of studying nature makes 
them profitable. 

— Those wishing Vol. II of the Life, bound, may 
have satisfactory work done at the Amherst Record 
office at a very reasonable price. There is no way 
equal to this for preserving back numbers of the 
paper and at the same time you have a neat addi- 
tion to your library. 

— The Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity was incorpo- 
rated under the laws of Massachusetts, Aug. 27, 
1892, with the following officers: — President, Wil- 
liam Colvard i^arker ; Treasurer, William P.Brooks ; 
Clerk, Ansel W. Paine ; Directors, Alfred S. Hall, 
George B. Willard, Joseph F. Barrett. 

— The foot-ball games arranged which are yet to 
be played are as follows : — 

Oct. 19, Willislon at Amherst. 

Oct 22, Mt. Hermoii at Mt. Hermon. 

Oct. 25, Amherst at Pratt Field. 

Oct. 29, Boston University at Amherst. 

Nov. 5, Springfield at Amherst. 

— For some reason unknown to the Life board, 
interest in the W. I. L. S. has been at a very low 
ebb thus far this term. Students should realize 
that this society is the oldest in college having en- 
rolled in its membership list the best men who have 
attended the institution. .Surely our debating club 
should receive the support of all who can possibly 
aid it. 



T. M. C. A. TOPICS. 
Oct. 20. — How shall we use the Bible? Prov. 2: 

1-6. C. A. Smith. 
Oct. 23, — Personal invitations ; have you given any? 

John 1 : 35-46. F. C. Tobey. 
Oct. 27,— The power of God's Word. Ps. 119: 

9-16. E. 0. Bagg. 
Oct. 30, — God's care for His children. Matt. 6: 

31-33. H. D. Hemenwav. 



32 



AGGIE LIFE. 



FOOT-BALL. 

Amherst, 58 ; Aggie 10. 

Aggie played her first game with Amherst, upon 
Pratt Field, Wednesday the 5th, and was defeated 
by a large score, but not without hard resistance. 
This is one of the largest scores Amherst has ever 
run up against Aggie, but it has lieen a very long 
time since Aggie has scored two touch- downs 
against them in one game. Perry, Bagg and Tiuo- 
00 did the star work for Aggie, and Van Leuven, 
Stagg's old end rush, and Goodale '94, the Lake 
Forest University half hack, were the life of Am- 
herst. Van Leuven often let the Aggie halfs ad- 
vance several yards, because of his trying to steal 
the ball instead of downing his man. This trick, 
however, was very successful as Amherst's score 
was doubled by Vau Leuvea's great game and 
sprinting the length of the field. Aggie played two 
substitutes and their team work vras commendable 
against the display of Amherst's beef. 

The Amherst's strongest point in team work was 
the blocking, but the backs had lo go somewhat too 
far to the sides at times. The Amhersts scored 18 
points in the first half to the Aggies 6. The refe- 
ree was Hamilton of Amherst and the umpire Good- 
rich of Aggie. The teams : 

AMHERST. POSITION. AGGIES. 

Eussell, left end right Manley 

Baldwin, left tackle right Henderson 

Haskell, left guard right Boardman 

Edgell, center Howard 

Cauthei's, right guard left Burrington 

Nourse, right tackle left P. E. Davis 

Van Leuven, right eud left Meleudy 

H. Pratt, quarter back Tinoco 

Ellis, , left half right Bagg 

Goodale, right half left Perry capt) 

G. Pratt (capt), full back Gifford 

Aggie, 16 ; Mt. Hekmon, 10. 
The eleven from Mt. Hermoa school were defeat- 
ed by Aggie, the 7th, by the score of 16-10. The 
game began at 3 o'clock, the Aggies having the 
ball. Perry gained 18 yds. but the ball was soon lost 
on a fumble and the "Hermonites" by hard center 
play worked the ball toward Aggie goal, and Fulton 
scored. Calhourn kicked goal. The Aggies forced 
the ball up the field. Perry and Gifford each gain- 
ed 15 yds. and Burrington by play through center 
scored. Perry failed at goal. The second touch- 
down was scored by Gifford ^fter having been given 



50 yds. on foul tackles. Perry kicked goal. The 
Mt. Hermons Yifird given 25 yds. for foul, and 
Calhourn scored touch-down but failed at goal. 
Score. Aggie 10, Mt. Hermon 10. 

The second half opened with Mt. Hermon ball. 
They lose it, and Aggie with small gains, and a 40 
yd. sprint by Perry, scores the final touch-down 
and goal. The remainder of the half sees the ball 
going back and forth by punts and return wedge 
work by Aggie, and at call of time Aggie ball on 
25 yd. line. 

The principle work of the visitors was done by 
Calhourn, Fulton, Morgan and Hatch, and for Ag- 
gie, Perry and Gifford made excellent runs. 

Cornell of the visiting team, broke his collar bone 
in the first half but pluckily played through the 
game. The teams lined up as follows : 

AGGIES. POSITION. MT. HERMONS. 

Drury, left end right Fulton 

P. E. Davis, left tackle right Johnson 

Burrington, left guard right Slpperly 

E. C. Howard, center Morgan 

Boardman, right guard left Lotts 

Henderson, right tackle left Cornell 

Manley, Putnam, right end left Crowell 

Tinoco, quarter back Sandei-son 

Gifford, Perry (capt) half backs Ritter, Hatch 

H. C. Davis, full back Calhourn (capt) 
Time 1 hour 40-min. Umpire, Goodrich. Referee, 
Canton of Princeton. 

Aggie, 18; Worcester Tech., 4. 

Worcester had the ballon the start off and gained 
10 yards with the V. By several good rushes they 
advanced the ball to Aggie's 20-yard line where it 
was lost on four downs. 

I'-agg ran around the eud for 20 yards and Perry 
made 12 through the line. Aggie then lost the ball 
on a fumble. Worcester lost '2\ yards on the first 
rush and then Southgate made a good punt down 
the field. Perry muffed the ball and Chase secured 
it on Aggie 20-yard line. Worcester gained slowly 
and then lost the ball on 10-yard line. Aggie failed 
to gain 5 yards. Worcester made one or two short 
gains and Allen scored the first touchdown in 15 
minutes from the call of play. Southgate failed for 
goal. 

Aggie gained 20 yards with the V. Bagg, Duf- 
field. Henderson, Perry and Davis each gained 5 
yards or more, and Henderson scored. Time 5 
minutes. Perry kicked goal. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



33 



Worcester gained 7 j'ards with the V and contin- 
ued to gain steadily to the 25-yard line where Bnr- 
rington secured the ball on a fumble. Bagg and 
Duffleld gained well but Aggie lost on 4 downs. 
Worcester gained a few yards and time was called. 
Score 6-4. 

Second half — Aggie gained 20 yards with the V. 
Bagg made 13 yards. Meleudy and Perry made 
good gains. Bagg made 8 yards more and Perry 3 
yards, Bagg scored. Perry kicks goal. 

Worcester gained 6 yards with the V and Allen 
went around the end for 10. Worcester then lost 
the ball on 4 downs. Aggie made some small gains 
and then Bagg went around the end for 15 yards. 
Perry made a short gain and then Bagg advanced 
the ball 15 yards more. Aggie continued to gain 
slowly but lost the ball on a foul tackle. Worcester 
failed to gain so Southgate tried a punt but lost the 
ball without gain. Aggie gained slowly to the 10 
yard line and Duffleld scored.. Perry kicked goal. 
Aggie stopped Worcester V well and they gained 
only 4 yards. Tried v' again and lost ground but 
got five yards on a foul. They gained slowly and 
then lost on 4 downs. Bagg gained 25 yards around 
the end. Chase tackled Perry behind the line. 
Time. 

The features of the game were the stopping of 
Worcester's V by Aggie and their own effective 
use of the play, the rushing of Bagg, and the tack- 
ling of Davis for A;2gie and the rushing of Allen 
and tackling of Chase for Worcester. Aggie ex- 
celled in team play but was rather weak on the left 
of the line. Perry's work in kicking goals was all 
that could be desired. 



AGGIES. 

Melendy, 

Duffleld, 

Burrington, 

Howard, 

Boardraan, 

Henderson, 

Mauley, 

Putnam, 

Perry (capt), 

Bagg, 

Davis, 



POSITION. 

left end right 
left tackle right 
left guard right 

center 
right guard left 
right tackle left 
right end left 
quarter back 
right half left 
left half right 
full back right 



Time, 1 hour. Referee, Mr. Rice. Umpire 



TECHS. 

Ware 

Butterfield 

Brigham 

Rogers 

Brooks 

Goodrich 

F. L. Stoue 

Chase 

F. H. Stone 

Allen (capt) 

Southgate 

Dr. Seerley. 



Why did she look so plain to him, 

And all her sex offenders? 
He'd stooped to raise her fallen glove, 

But the strain broke his suspenders. 



THE MUSEUM. 

The following are some of the stuffed specimens 
which have been placed in the museums within the 
last two weeks : she deer, grey fox, kangaroo, opos- 
sum, black bear, grey wolf, hellbender, water snake, 
fox squirrel, flying squirrel, shrew mole, ermine, 
skunk, little musk turtle and toad. 

The Zoological museum is rapidly adding new 
attractions and certainly deserves more attention 
and appreciation from the students than is made 
manifest. It is quite safe to say there are men here 
in the Sophomore and Junior classes who have never 
even visited the place. Prof. Fernald is aiming to 
get mounted specimens of all the animals that occur 
or have occurred in Massachusetts, and at least for 
those who are interested in natural history the room 
affords special interest and attractiveness. The 
increasing number of specimens requires that new 
cases be built very soon and it is only a matter of a 
short time when the collection shall have swelled out 
of its present quarters. 



Schillare's 
Photographic Studio, 



SOCIETY. CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIN STREET, 



SOJtTBAMPTON, MASS. 



34 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Will the members of the aliimoi please direct all 
alumni notices to T. S. BacOQ. Let all co-operat^■ 
in making this department a successful one by for- 
wardiu" any and all news relative to the alumni to 
the above address. 

The officers of the M. A. C. Alumni Club of 
Mass. for the coming year are : — President, W. C. 
Parker,'80, Treasurer, C. L. Flint, '81, Clerk, F.H. 
Fowler, '87. Dr. Austin Peters, '81, Fred G-. 
May, '82, and Wm. A. Bowker, '71, are directors. 

Hon. H. S. Corruth, '76, has been nominated by 
the Democrats of the 9th Suffolk Senatorial District 
as a candidate for the State Senate. 

Chas. 0. Lovell, '78, is now runner for the Lewis- 
ton, Me. Dry Plate Co., headquarters at Boston, 
Mass. 

F. A. Ober, who was expected to deliver the ad- 
dress at the Town Hall on Columbus Day has can- 
celled his engagement'. 

C. F. W. Felt, '86, for the past two years Resi- 
dent Engineer of the Gulf, Colorado, and Santa F6 
R. R., at Cleburne, Texas, has accepted the posi- 
tion of Office Engineer with tlu Rio Grande South- 
ern R. R., at Ridway. Colorado. 

E. R. Flint, Ph. D., '87, is located at 15 Congress 
St., Boston, Mass, as an Analytical Chemist. 

.J. Martin, '87, is inventor of a campaign pin 
which has met with much favor. His "Aggie Horse 
Feeder" was also successful. 

H. H. Bliss, '88. was in town last week. He is 
now traveling salesman for Bliss Bros., Jewellers, 
No. Attleboro, Mass. 

— B. L. Hartwell '89, and wife announce the 
birth of a daughter, Oct. 15, 1892. Mr. Hartwell 
is assistant chemist in the Rhode Island Experi- 
ment Station, Kingston, R. I. 

Dwight W. Dickinson, '90, and Walter I. Boyn- 
ton, '92, are studying at the Boston Dental College, 
Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

We wish to correct the mistake in the class num- 
ber of H. M. Thomson, published in last issue. 
It should be '92 rather than '91. 



APPLAUSE. 

Under the chandeliers' blaze 
See how they listen and gaze. 
Listen, their eyes growing tender, 
Gaze, while the magical splendor 
My music spreads in their skies 
Flushes and darkles and dies. 
I, who have wrought them the wonder. 
What do I care for their cries. 
Plaudits, and hand-clapping thunder? 
All that I care for is yonder : 
A strip of brow in the dotted maze, 
One loosened strand cutting through it, and under, 
Blown by a rapture of gladness asunder, 
Thrilling me through with an exquisite praise, 
Her two eyes. 

Harvard Monthly. 



His hair is long, and thick, and brown. 
His frame is gaunt and spare. 

Is he some poet of renown? 
Oh no. He's a football player. 



2S. E^ETIT. 

INSTRUCTOK IN 



Is now forming a class in dancing- for M. A. C. men. There will be 
an advanced division for those who can dance already, in which the 
latest (lances will be taught. For terms inquire at ray Hall. 

.e®-Members of my former classes as well as the present ones 
can obtain admission cards to the Receptions by applying at the Hall. 
Residence and Hall., Dickinson's Buock. 



STFDEJXTS' SUPPLIES. 

IS, J. r@'WI»ER. 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 

ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 

GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 

FIRST CLASS GOODS. l-RICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH COLt-EZGEl. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 



and Carpet Renovatii Establislimeiit. 

Aggie Agent, C. L. 3R0WN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



35 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 



" Lamps M Lamp Ooofe are Ours." 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, A3IMERST, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEEBi SALE STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r 



Sophomores, 32 ; Freshmen, 0. 
The Sophomore-Freshman game took place last 
Wednesday afternoon and resulted i.i a victory for 
'95. The Freshmen phiycd well but the weight and 
experience of the Sopliomores outbalanced them. 
Bagg alone carried off the '9.5 lionors, while the work 
of Marshall and Washburn of the Freshman team 
was commendable. The teams lined up as follows : 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMBJERST, MASS. 



J. A. RAWI 



DEALER IN 



Ttf flTGllES, GiiOCHS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

REPAIRING NEATLY APIO ROMPTLY DOME. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



y~ 



P 



H 



H 




.A.3S/CICEE.SX, 



3S/C.A.SS. 



'95. 




POSITIONS. 


'96. 


Frost, 




left-eud-rlght 


Moore , 


Drury, 




left- tackle-right 


Hay ward, 


Read, 




left-gnard-right 


Heffelflnger, 


Fairbanks, 




center 


Kinsmann, 


Ballon, 




riglit-gnard-left 


Burrington, 


Marsh, 




right-tackle-left 


Nutting, 


Duffleld, (Capt 


,) 


right-end-left 


Harper, 


Stevens, 




quarter-back 


Hubbard, 


Bags', Cooley, 


Sum 


van, half-backs 


Sastre, Marshall, 


Toole, 




fnll-baok 


Washburn, (Capt.) 


Tonchdowns 


-Ba 


gg 5, Toole. Goals— Toole 4. Urn- 


pire— Howard, 


'93. 


Referee— Gifford 


Time— Ih. 






NOTICES. 





Mails leave the college for the post-office at 1 p. m. and 
7-40 P. M. on week days. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Spriugfield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 p. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massa- 
chusetts, 7-45, 10-45, A. M. 4 00, 6-45 p. M. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-45 a. 
M. 4-00, 6 45 P. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 45, 8-30 p. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. M. 

The President will lie at his office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except .Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 3 to 5 
p. M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the term. 

The college library will he open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 

The museum of natural history will be open to 
visitors from 4-30 to 5-30 p. m. Mondays,Tuesday8 
and Thursdays; from 3 to 4 p. m. Wednesdays, 
and Fridays. Will be closed Saturdays and 
Sundays. 



36 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes i Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Sheet Music, 



Music Books, 



Strings 

FOR "THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUIXAR, 



CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



A.2VLE€BH,ST. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 



,.^ DENTISTS. 3),. 



C. S. GATES, D. D. 8. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CCTIJSJS'S BZOCK, AMHERST.^MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
9 A.. I.I. TO S F. T>/C. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 



Jeweler, 



ician. 



Watchmaker. 



PINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PHTSXCIANH' PRMSCRIPTIOyS CAREFVLI^Y 
COMPO UNDEI), 

AT 

MORGAN'S PH.4RMACY, 

6 PHCENLK ROW. 

Order your ©©^S here. 



WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODGETT k CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



Yuv Buits a.ncl Fall QvercQats 

CALL AT OUR STOKE NEXT TO THE BANK. 

FINE ITAL m FAIENCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, .f2.50 AND $3.00. 

For Fine Frnit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O. G. com CM & SON'S. 
FRANK C. PLTJMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseatj, 

RAZORS HONED. 

Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Coolc's Block, Amherst, Mass, 






YLEF'S 



DD 



-\ 



FRESH ANH PINE, 



DEOEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst House Block, 



Amlierst, Mass, 



:e=:ez.z^2=5,is^.^cist. 

MO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - ■ AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood:'s Hotel. 



1850. 



1892. 



THE FHOTOBRilFHER. 



new sky lioht. 
e:ni_arge:d operating room. 

CLASS AND SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY. 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



?. 8. Di(?Hii::^so(^, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



^^Etlier and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T TliE 



AMHERST CASH SHBE STGREi 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 

A. GLYNN, 



4TA1 LOR. 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty, j 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



JVIilitapy Suits and Tpimmings. 



[assachuseiis Aaricoltural Colleae, 







t:i(.s>y- :->~i. 



'•■'^^^^^'■^-^^■jizj'fig^f 



t- 






iiiliJiiafiiliiilil^i "*"'' 




A.i3:i_l::S-eM^^t« ^^I^o.«^«^® 



h. ''>r (J'i.t.,>-^^A 



,>e-^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



, AMHERST, MilBS., NDIT. 2, 1BB2. 



YQL. III. Mn. 4. 



*eR'IMTERS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS, AGRICULTURy^L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to uainc, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS. 




THE AMHERST 

up jiND CAB 



C. H. SANDERSOH & CO., 



CASH DEALERS IN 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



SyiNDEpH & THOMPSOf(, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL ' 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVKRYBODY. 



HID 



rn 



STOK.H]. 



A complete line of goods suited to tlie students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, S TUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 



CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All Goods STKICTET CASH and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 

E. 13. MARSH, 

10 PHCENtX ROW, - - AMHERST, MASS. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

iKTJSBEI^ <3-OOIDS. 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



s,EFA.iK,iasTC3- laoisrE -e'RCHs/L-pTT-mr . 



T, W. SLOAN. 

2 PJSaSNlX BOW. 



5 



O jI & • 



u\SL6x KiairiDer, 

STEA^ AND GAS PSIJER. 




A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam mid H<»t Water IfeatiiiM: a Speeialtj. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. ITI. 



AMHP:RST, MASS., NOVEMBER 2, 1892. 



No. 4 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post OfiBce as secoud-class mail matter. 

BOARD 0£' EDITORS : 

G. F. CURLEY, '93, Editor-in-Chief, 

J. E. PERRY, '93, Business Manager, 

B. C. HOWARD, '93, F. S. HOYT, '93, 



A. E. MELENDY, 
T. S. BACON, '94, 



C. F. WALKER, '94, 
T. F. KEITH, '94, 



T. P. FOLEY, '95. 



Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



When are the uniforms to be ready for the Fresh- 
man class? This is a query that is often heard 
nowadays, as the military drill has so advanced as 
to mal<e the absence of uniforms in the ranks of the 
Fresiimen more noticeable than ever. We under- 
stand that the suits will be ready, per contract, by 
the middle of November. Will it not be possible, 
hereafter, to let out the work in such a manner that 
the suits will be ready at least by the middle ox 
October? When the West Point uniform was in 
use they were furnished to the incoming cinss in a 
very short time after the opening of the term, while 
since that time there has always been a great deal 
of confusion and annoyance attendant upon the 
purchase of suits. Can we not follow the example 
of most other military institutions, and have a 
college tailor who alone shall be responsible for the 
militarv suits? 



A MEMBER of our examining committee recently 
made the criticism that our morning chapel exercise 



was not what it should be in the matter of quietness, 
and if one will only observe for himself, he will see 
the justice of the criticism. There is too much 
noise and confusion, too much conversation carried 
on, even after the officer in charge has risen to con- 
duct the services, and chapel service seems to 
present more the appearance of a political caucus 
than of a religious exercise. Many of the students 
do not seem to realize that chapel, even though it be 
a compulsory exercise, is as much a meeting for 
worship as the exercises held in their own churches 
at home. Doubtless this lack of regard for the 
pioprieties of the place and occasion is due wholly 
to thoughtlessness, but it is doubtful if such thought- 
lessness is pardonable. A visitor receives a bad 
impression of the students and the college by 
attending an exercise where so little attention is 
shown to the proprieties of the occasion, and goes 
away with the feeling that some of the stories which 
he has heard about the students may bi true. So 
let us make an effort in the line of impiovement in 
this matter, for the sake both of our own good name 
and that of the college. 



Is the element "push" a prominent feature in the 
character of the M. A. C. student? This is an open 
question, and one that each man must answer for 
himself. If we single out certain men and take 
them as illustrations, we might conclude that deter- 
mination is an eminent quality in our institution. 
But, on the other hand, how many there are of the 
opposite character, that simply go to lower the 
standard in this respect. In the course here we 
have many advantages extended to us ; how many 
do we accept in the manner we should in justice to 
ourselves ? But in particular, of the various organi- 
zations, the benefits of which are extended to us, 
the number is exceedingly small that accomplish 
their full |)urpose, solely because of the half-hearted 
way in which they are conducted. A prominent 



38 



AGGIE LIFE. 



example of this is the W. I. L. S. The work this 
club is doing for the members at present is obviously 
very slight. But this is not the fault of the society- 
Its object is a very laudable one. The trouble lies 
in the men themselves, and until every member goes 
in and determines to push the debating club up to the 
position in college it deserves to occupy, just so long 
will it be a farce. This same principle holds true 
in foot-ball, base-ball, and every other organization. 
We must enter these things with whole-heartedness, 
determination, and push, and then nothing but 
success can follow. 



A FREQUENT criticism on college education is that 
while a man's intellectual capacity is enlarged by 
his four year's study, his constant intercourse with 
the same instructors for so long a time may tend to 
narrow his views and make him less liberal in his 
opinions. It is a generally observed fact that in 
many of our sciences, especially those of a practical 
nature, different men of equal capacity may hold 
opposite views in regard to the same matter. It 
must be apparent that judgments will be formed 
which will prove of far greater value to the student 
if he is privile^icd to hear a question discussed from 
the standpoint of different individuals. In the 
earlier history of the college, lectures by prominent 
agriculturists, horticulturists, veterinarians, etc., 
constituted an important, part of the course. While 
this plan was adopted largely on account of the 
insufficient number of professors, it must have been 
in many ways an advantage to those who were then 
students. We realize the impracticability of obtain- 
ing lecturers in some of the branches taught in the 
course, but it would seem feasible to carry out this 
plan to a certain extent. In agricultural and horti- 
cultural subjects, especially, it would appear that 
men who have attained prominence in these occupa- 
tions could be secured, who would be willing to set 
forth their plans and ideas to the students. While 
there would probably be conflicting opinions on 
many points, the student's acquaintance with differ- 
ent ideas and methods would enable him to settle 
disputed questions more advantageously. And not 
only in subjects mentioned would this plan be of 
benefit, but a great variety of to[)ics of interest to 
the students could be enumerated, upon which the 
opinions of authorities would be welcomed. While 



a liberal course of reading may be substituted for 
this plan, no one will deny that verbal explanation 
is preferable to a written exposition. We have no 
doubt but that the students would appreciate it, if 
this plan was carried out as far as it is practicable. 



The Mass. Agricultural College has long been 
celebrated for the excellence of its military depart- 
ment. Visitors at the college always evince great 
interest in the military drill, and it is evident to 
everyone who investigates the matter that the de- 
partment owes its success not merely to the work of 
the commandant, but in a great degree to the indi- 
vidual efforts of the students in its behalf. Although 
discontented ones may be found here and there in 
the battalion, we think it can be truly said that the 
military department is now and ever lias been popu- 
lar with the students. Military instruction is 
not to be found- in every college, and it is but 
natural that the student body should take a certain 
pride in the excellence of this peculiar feature of 
our institution. Great progress has been made in 
the last five years. Alumni, returning to Alma 
Mater are sure to comment on. many changes which 
have been instituted since they were in college. The 
increased number of students has very naturally 
increased the interest in the drill. The band has 
worked long and hard to attain the reputation 
which it now enjoys, and the erection of a band- 
stand upon the college grounds can be traced 
directly to its efforts. The demerit system, although 
very naturally encountering opposition at first, has 
done much toward bringing the drilling of the cadets 
up to the required standard. Two months of the 
new term have now passed away, and the military 
department has flourished under a new administra- 
tion. The companies have been organized, and 
the institution will soon assume a more definite 
shape than heret(3fore. At the commencement of 
the new college year there is every prospect for 
the attainment of still greater excellence than has 
been attained in the past ; but that this may come to 
pass let us not forget that the best efforts of every 
member of the corps is demanded. Let us take 
pride in our military drill, and let us one and all do 
all in our power to make it in the future even better 
than it has been in the past. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



39 



^onfribw-ted. 



THE STATE CONVENTION OF THE 
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSO- 
CIATION. 

The twenty-sixth annual conveution of tlie Young 
Men's Christian Association of Massachusetts and 
Rhode Island was held in Pittsfleld, Mass., Oct. 
5^0-23. A more suitable place than this beautiful 
city could not well have been selected and the wel- 
come extended to the 300 delegates, showed that 
the local association was doing all in its power to 
make the convention a success. 

The opening session was held in the First Con- 
gregational church at 3 p. m., Thursday, and was 
followed at five o'clock by a banquet in Central Hall 
tendered to the delegates by the Woman's Ausil- 
liary. After the banquet, Pres. Whittlesey called 
the gathering to order and introduced the Rev. Mr. 
Coats of the Baptist church, who assured the visit- 
ors of the heartiest of welcomes. Prof. J. E. 
Pierson and Rev. J. C. Newton also added words 
of welcome and were followed by other interesting 
speakers, who occupied the time until the eveuiug 
service. 

At 8.15, Rev. T- D. Anderson of Providence, R. 
I., gave an interesting discourse which was follow- 
ed by the report of the State Committee, presented 
by Russell Sturgis of Boston ; State Secretary Arm- 
strong also gave a very interesting .rejjort showing 
that there are at present 77 associations iu the dis- 
trict, all doing progressive Christian work. At the 
close of the reports, the work of raising the neces- 
sary funds for the State committee began, and in a 
short time over $6000 was pledged. 

The services Friday morning were largely attend- 
ed, although there were many attractions incident 
to Columbus Day ; able addresses were given by J. 
T. Brown of Springfield, by Robert U'erdensall of 
Chicago aud a very inspiring Bible reading by Rev. 
G. C. Needham of Philadelpliia. At 12 o'clock 
there was a parlor conference for pastors and busi- 
ness men. 

The afternoon was devoted entirely to sports 
held on the fair grounds under the direction of Dr. 
Seerley. Medals of gold, silver and bronze were 
awarded to the men scoring the requisite number of 



points, and the Pawtucket team secured the $50 
banner offered to the team scoring the most points. 
The sports concluded with a footbail game between, 
the Mt. Herman's of Northfleld and the Christian 
Workers of Springfield ; the game was interesting 
throughout, the score at the finish being 18-8 in 
favor of the Christian Workers. 

The evening meeting began with a praise service, 
after which an instructive address was given by 
Cephas Braiuard of New York, on "What Ought 
to be the Scope of Educational Work ?" George 
T. Dovvling followed with a talk on "Forces that 
Win." 

The principal feature Saturday morning was the 
Bible reading, by the Rev. Mr. Needham, and the 
presentation of • the banner won in the athletic 
sports by Pawtucket, by Mr. Sturgis. Other 
speeches followed and at noon the delegates were 
photographed on the court-house steps. Saturday 
afternoon aud evening an interesting program was 
carried out ; one of the iustructive features being 
the Question Drawer conducted by State Secretary 
Armstrong. During Sunday additional services 
were held in all the chuuehes in the city and ad- 
joining towns, and in the evening a farewell service 
was held in the Methodist church. 



SPECIAL STUDY. 

The course of this institution offers to those who 
are pursuing the regular routine of study a general 
education which will prove of incalculable value to 
all that complete it. Every branch studied, every 
new idea obtained is an addition to one's intellec- 
tual store, which in the aggregate marks the man of 
education and culture. But it is a mistaken idea 
that a man should restrict himself to the studies 
which are prescribed in the course. Every student 
and especially an upper classman has a more or less 
definite idea as to what line of work he shall fol- 
low after graduation and during the entire course 
some post graduate plan should be consjtantly kept in 
view in order that the greatest practical benefit may 
be obtained from tlie course. It is the purpose of 
this article to indicate in what ways those who are 
interested in particular branches may improve the 
opportunities which this institution offers for special 
study. 

We may consider as of greatest importance the 



40 



AGGIE LIFE. 



libraries at our command. We have special privi- 
leges in tliis direction and there is no reason why 
anyone who will rightly use this opportunity may 
not be, on the completion of his course, thoroughly 
informed in his chosen field of study. 

Next in importance perhaps are our laboratories. 
Our chemical, botanical and zoological laboratories 
offer advantages for special investigation which 
those who are interested iu the study of science fail 
to sufHcientlj' appreciate. The professors in charge 
of these different laboratories would be willing to 
assist by permitting the use of apparatus and by 
suggestions. 

The facilities for special study of any of the div- 
isions of agriculture and horticulture which this in- 
stitution affords are, of course, unexcelled. Both 
the theoretical and practical side of these and allied 
pursuits may be made an object of research and the 
student who is interested should not be satisfied 
with the prescribed work in these departments. 

In additioil the zoological and botanical museums, 
the college herbarium, and reading rooms may be 
made use of according as each one shall see fit. 
Our opportunities for special study are ample and 
it only remains for us to so economize our time that 
they may be improved. 



THE LIBRARY. 



A visit to the Library on Friday afternoon show- 
ed it to have increased remarkably, both in size and 
importance during the last few months. It is rap- 
idly becoming headquarters in this State for all 
matters pertaining to Agriculture in its various 
branches. New books are constantly being re- 
ceived both by purchase and gift, fifteen hundred 
and sixty-eight volumes having been put in since 
last commencement. 

There are now ready for circulation or reference, 
complete sets of 

"The Holstein-Friesian Herd Book," 25 vols. 
"The American Shorthorn Herd Book," 38 vols. 
"Coates' English Herd Book," 40 vols. 
"The American Jersey Cattle Club Book," 25 vols. 
"The Veterinarian" 53 vols. 

The sets of the other herds are in different stages 
of completion. Among the other new books might 
be mentioned : 



"The English report on Contagious Diseases," up 

to the year 1889. 14 vols. 
"The Poultry Monthly," brought up to date. 
"Dr. Millspaugh's Medicinal Plants," 2 vols. 
A work on the "British Hawk Moths," containing 

numerous beautiful hand painted illustrations. 
"The Auk," 10 vols, by the highest authorities on 

this bird. 
"The Spiders of America," Keyserling. 4 vols. 
"Hubners Butterflies," 3 vols. Hand-painted il- 
lustrations. A valuable book. 
"Smith's Insects of Georgia," illustrated. 
"Itinerary of Gen. Washington," from June 15, 
1775 to Dec. 23, 1783, being a collection of 
messages sent, items, etc., (loncerning the great 
man, from his appointment as Commander-in- 
Chief of the American army till his resignation 
fromthat position, the most interesting part of 
his career. 
"Ridpath's History of the World," 3 vols. This is 
a standard work on this subject. Profusely 
illustrated. 
"Photography for Amateurs." 
"Personal Magnetism," etc., etc. 

The Library contains books not only upon Agri- 
culture in all its forms, but upon economic questions 
also; "The Labor Question ;" "The Money Ques- 
tion;" "Political Economy ;" Civil Service ;" "So- 
cialism ;" "Education ;" etc. 

The books are catalogued verj' completely. Two 
different classifications, one giving the hooks under 
the author's name, and the other with the subject 
headings themselves make a complete index of con- 
tents. 



COMMUNIGA TION. 



The regular meeting of the W. I. L. S., held 
Friday evening had a rather unusual termination. 
A notice had during the day been posted on the 
bulletin board calling on all students interested in 
the success of the Republican party to be on hand 
at the Old Chapel at 7 o'clock sharp, which was the 
hour of the meeting of the W. I., consequently the 
VV. I. was pretty well attended. After calling the 
roll and the reading of the minutes, the president 
announced the discussion of the question in order 
when H.F. Staples arose and moved an adjournment. 
The motion being so unusual at this stage of the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



41 



proceedings the President permitted debate upon 
it. In the discussion that ensued it transpired that 
the adjournment was desired for the purpose of the 
meeting resolving itself into a Republican Club, and 
that several persons not raLinbers of the W.I. were 
at that moment present to urge the measure on the 
meeting, one of whom was courteously allowed to 
speak on the question of adjournment. The motion 
to adjourn was vigorously opposed by F. T. Ilarlow, 
A. E. Melendy, D. C. Potter and F. A. Smith, but 
was finally carried by a close vote which its oppon- 
ents doubted, but the doubt was not pressed. 

The President announcing that it was now a mass 
meeting, called Mr. Staples to the chair, and all 
persons interested in the mati.er were invited to 
remain. But few left the room, the recalcitrant 
members of the W. I. clustered together disconso- 
lately, like a colony of bumble bees whose citidel 
had been raided by a burglarious field mouse. 

Mr. Noyce of Amherst College was then intro- 
duced, who spoke briefly and forcibly of the desira- 
bility of forming a Republican Club at the college, 
saying, that the Amherst College Republican Club 
intended to go to Boston next Thursday night to join 
in the parade, and return by special train, and that the 
Aggie Club, if formed, would undoubtedly be given 
an opportunity to go. 

The acting chairman lhe;i called for ballots for 
President. A member rose and casting his eyes to 
the malcontents said it was evident that there was an 
element in the hall that did not sympathize with the 
object of the meeting, and remained only to create 
disturbance and break it up. This brought a spirit- 
ed response from the designated group that they 
indeed did not approve of the proceedings of the 
evening, but that they had listened with respect to 
the speaker, deported themselves decorously, and 
supposed from the terms of the invitation that they 
were privileged to remain ; if, however, the chairman 
thought otherwise they would withdraw. 

Chairman Staples with a courtesy and a regard 
for freedom of speech worthy of the Czar of all the 
Russias, replied, "If you don't stop talking we want 
you to leave," but the sheep were separated from 
the goats by asking the faithful to come forward and 
the organization was then completed by the election 
of F. H. Henderson, President ; H. F. Staples, 
Vice-Pres. ; T. F. Keith, Sec'y ; G. H. Merwin, 



Treasurer ; L. W. Smith, L. Manley, Directors. 
After other business the meeting adjourned. 



SENIOR ELECTIONS. 
Oct. 27, the Class of '93 elected the following 
officers for Commencement. 



Class Orator, 
Campus Orator, 
Ivy Poet, 
Campus Poet, 
Pipe Orator, 
Grove Orator, 



CLASS DAT. 

F. H. Henderson. 
C. A. Goodrich. 
C. A. Smith. 

E. C. Howard. 

F. S. Hoyt. 
H. F. Staples. 

CLASS SOPPER. 

Toastra aster, E. C. Howard. 

Odist, A. E. Melendy. 

Twin Jesters, Perry and Davis. 

Orator, G. F. Curley. 

Poet, F. T. Harlow. 

Prophet, F. A. Smith. 

Prophet's Prophet, H. .J. Harlow. 

Choragus, H. D. Clark. 

Historian, G. F. Curley. 

COMMITTEES. 

Supper Committee : J. R. Periy, L. A. Tinoco, 
L. W. Smith. 

Senior Promenade : E. H. Lehnert, G. F. Cur- 
ley, C. A. Goodrich, C. A. Smith, F. A. Smith. 

Picture Committee : E. C. Howard, F. A. Smith, 
L. A. Tinoco. 

Class Day Committee : F. H. Henderson, F. G. 
Bartlett, C. A. Goodrich, F. S. Hoyt, A. E. 
Melendy. 

Musical Committee : H. J. Harlow, E. C. How- 
ard, H. D. Clark. 

C. A. Goodrich, Pres. 

F. A. Smith, Sec. 



There was once a chemist who had a " best girl," 
And 'tis true that he did not dispise her, 

But the very peculiar part of it was 
That she should be named Ann Eliza. 



When students go on a quiet time 
Which they wish to have " kept dark, 

If they begin by taking a swalloio, 
It often turns into a lark. 



The Faculty and Freshmen at Leland Stanford 
Jr. University played a game of base-ball recently 
the former meeting defeat 27-10. 



42 



AGGIE LIFE. 



oiiegf 



— F. S. Hoyt, '93, has been at home the past 
week. 

— G. F. Cuiiey, '93, spent a few days in Boston 
last week. 

— Mr. Gilbert Day of Haverhill lias entered the 
Freshman class. 

— The orchestra was photographed at Northamp- 
ton Columbus Day. 

— Mr. Patrick A. Leamy of Petersham is a new 
member of the Freshman class. 

— Stoddard, "96, has found it necessary to leave 
college on account of ill health. 

— G. A. Hubbard, '96, was called home last week 
to attend the funeral of his sister. 

— Frank Miller's Harness Dressing and a polish- 
ing corapuund at the Drill Hall upon request. 

- -H. B. Read, '95, wiio was obliged io go homo; 
on account of sickness last week has returned. 

— Patience should be one of the editor's virtues, 
as waiting for Aggie Life proof will demonstrate. 

— The orders for college buttons have been sent 
and U is expected that they will soon be received. 

— Much comment has been made on the excel- 
lence of the board at the Boarding Club this term. 

— Oct. 28, the Sophomore class, under Prof. 
Brooks inspected the drains on the college grounds. 

— The rope-pull between teams of the two lower 
classes has been postponed from Oct. 28 to Nov. 4. 

— Frank L. Clapp, '96, has been elected historian 
of his class in place of Miss F. M. Vallentine, re- 
signed. 

— The M. A. C. was well represented at the 
Mendelssohn concert, the opening one of the course, 
Oct. 17th. 

— The foot-ball team and glee club went to North- 
ampton last Friday and were photographed at Schil- 
lare's studio. 

— Frost, Root, Tobey, and White, '95, attended 
the y. M. C. A. convention held at Pittsfield, Oct. 
20 to 23 inclusive. 

—Dr. J. B. Lindsay, '83, addressed the Y.M.C.A 
last Thursday evening, taking for his subject, "Re- 
ligion in Germany." 



— In accordance with the recommendation of the 
Foot-ball Association a tax of 75 cents has been 
levied on the college. 

— Several of the students spent Columlms Day 
at home and the failure of some to return on time 
has brought retribution. 

— The Junior laboratory work in zoology is prov- 
ing unusually interesting to the class under the able 
direction of Prof. Feruald. 

— The recitations of the mathematical department 
were held in Professor Fernald's recitation room 
during a portion of last week. 

— The season of mid-terra examinations is once 
more at hand and has caused a noticeable increase 
in study among the unfortunate. 

— Tinoco has recovered sufficiently from his in- 
jury to play during practice games, meanwhile Put- 
nam, '94, is playing as quarter-back. 

— Through an oversight, it was not stated in last 
issue that H. VV. Moore, '96, has been elected 
Freshman director of the Polo Association. 

— As the new dam nears completion, would 
it not be a good idea for the Polo directors to put 
their heads together and plan for the winter's work? 

— Students exercising in the gymnasium should 
employ other apparatus thitn the electric light switch. 
That has its own use, and should not be meddled 
with. 

— Dr. Wm. P. Holbrook of Palmer and Chas. A. 
Mills of South Williamstown, members of the Ex- 
aming Committee visited the college since our last 
issue. 

— President Goodell and Dr. Goessmann will de- 
liver addresses at the winter meeting of the State 
Board of Agriculture, held at Spencer, Dec. 6, 7, 
and 8. 

— The little chestnut boy at the corner of South 
College is a frequent sight these frosty mornings 
and his faithful dog watches over his interests with 
stern visage and set jaw. 

— The non-commissioned officers of the battalion 
are now receiving instruction on the Extended Or- 
der Drill. The theories learned will be put into 
practice at the earliest opportunity. 

— Several men failed to put in their appearance 
Monday morning after Columbus Day. This is us- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



43 



ually the case following a holiday, and it is an evil 
which students should try to eradicate. 

—The foot-ball game which was to have been 
played with Mt. Hermou, Oct. 22ud was cancelled 
to allow some of the men to spend Friday and Sat- 
urday at home. 

— The appearance of a feline acquaintance in 
some of the recitation I'ooms last week caused a 
ripple of merriment among tlie students, but its ef- 
fect upon one of the Professors was remarkable. 

— The conduct of Ihe students at the Aggie- Wil- 
liston game was very commeudable and it is hoped 
that should any games occur in the future between 
the two institutious the same gentlemanly bearing 
will prevail. 

— Many of the slndeuts attended the Columbian 
celebration at the Town Hall, Oct. 21. Prof. C. 
S. Walker was one of the speakers. The music 
furnished by the M. A. C. orchestra was especially 
commendaljle. 

— Indei)endent Democratic Club Officers; Pres., 

F. A. Smith; Vice-Presidents, C. H. Spaulding, 

G. F. Curley ; Sec, S. F. Howard; Treas., A. C. 
Curtis ; 1st Director, C. P. Lounsberry ; 2nd Direc- 
tor, T. P. Foley. 

— Games to be jjlayed : — 
Nov. 5, Springfield Training School at Amherst. 
Nov. 9, Mt. Hermou at Mt. Hermon. 
Nov. 12, Harvard, '96, at Cambridge. 
Nov. 16, Open. 
Nov. 18, Open. 

— The pond will have a gravel bottom along its 
edge, to prevent sedges and coarse water grasses 
from growing there and tlie field is being plowed 
lor that purpose. A tile drain will also be laid 
around the pond to keep the margin in good condi- 
tion. 

— An experiment with tuberculin is soon to be 
carried out by Dr. Paige, and will be the second 
ever attempted in this country; the first having 
been tried at the University of Pennsylvania with 
great success. It will be a diagnostic experiment, 
rather than as a preventative of the disease. 

— The number of bicycles in college increases 
steadily. M. A. C. students evidently appreciate 
the rapid transit and the consequent saving of time 



obtained with those health-giving machines. The 
situation of the College too, so far from town, tends 
to increase their number and usefulness. 

— The Glee Club has elected to its membership, 
J. Baker, '93, G. A. Billings, '95, andF. E. DeLuce, 
'96. At present the organization of the Club is as 
follows: — 1st tenor, E. O. Bagg, J. Baker. 2nd 
tenor, E. C. Howard, G. A. Billings. 1st bass, H. 
D. Clark, H. J. Harlow. 2nd bass, F. H. Hender- 
son, F. E. DeLuce. 

— The agricultural department of the U. S. gov- 
ernment has requested that the model of the horse, 
jnst purchased for our miiseum, be sent as a part 
of the college exhibit to the World's Fair. It would 
necessarily be there six months, and the question is, 
Can Dr. Paige spare it for so long a time ? They 
will cover the expense of having an air tight glass 
case made for it. 

— It IS interesting to notice the condition of the 
campus just before a foot ball game. Deserted. 
No one would suppose to look at it that in fifteen 
minutes it would be covered by a crowd of enthusi- 
astic spectators, and two elevens desperately bat- 
tling for victiiry. It would seem as if they desired 
to give the poor, weary, down-trodden grass a 
chance to breathe before the struggle. 

— The first "Fire Drill" of the term was lield last 
Wednesday. Although many of the men had re- 
ceived no previous iustructiou concerning this drill 
the behavior of the cadets and their rapidity in 
handling the apparatus was very creditable. The 
supposed fire was on the Drill Hall roof and ladders 
being raised, a line of hose was run to the roof 
which was thoroughly drenched. Damage slight 
and due to water and paint. 

— Ever since the opening of the term rumois have 
been rife concerning the progress that is being 
made toward the proposed revision of the course of 
study, and the introduction of electives. A new 
schedule of studies has been drawn up Ijy the fac- 
ulty, and this is to be submitted to the trustees for 
their approval. It is probable that the matter will 
be settled and the new scheme got into working 
order before next Commencement. 



Harvard has made application lor 7000 square 
feet for its intended exhibit at the World's Fair. 



44 



AGGIE LIFE. 



FOOT-BALL. 
M. A. C. 22 ; Williston 12. 

Aggie played the Williston Seminary eleven on 
the campus tlie 19th and defeated them after a hard 
struggle 22-12. 

It was the first time the two institutions had met 
upon the athletic field for several seasons, and gen- 
tlemanly conduct prevailed to the extent thai indi- 
cated that once again the Aggie-Williston games 
would be revived and bring the athletics of the in- 
stitutions in closer relation to each other. 

The features of the game were the long runs by 
Perry and Bagg, and the playing of Gifford, Manley 
and Howard of the home team. For the Willistons 
the pnntiug of Fletcher and the playing of Gait and 
Hitchcock was noticeable. 

The Willistons had the ball at the start off and 
with their V gained 5 yards. Tyler followed with 
10 yards around the end, and after several small 
gains at center play Capt. Keator scored the first 
touchdown, and Fletcher kicked a goal. Time 2 
minutes. 

After some hard playing and frequent changes of 
the ball, Bagg made three sprints of 10 yards each, 
and scored Aggie's first touchdown. Perry kicked 
goal. Williston worked the V, made good end and 
center gains and soon Tyler scored a touchdown. 
Fletcher kicked goal. 

The Aggies started off with a small gain with V, 
and Perry evened up the score by running the length 
of the field and scoring a touchdown and goal. The 
half thus ended with the score tied. 

Aggie opened the second half, tried a V, Perry 
slipped out of it for 15 yards. A fumble secured 
Williston the ball, but small losses compelled 
Fletcher to punt, giving Perry the ball and 10 yards. 
Both teams now fumbled the hall several times, but 
Aggie finally held it, and Bagg gained 15 yards, 
and Man ley by a lieautiful run carried the sphere to 
within 4 yards of Williston goal. Perry immediate- 
ly plungeil through the line and scored touchdown 
and goal. 

Williston made an unsuccessful start and Aggie 
secured the ball on a punt, Perry and Bagg success- 
ively made short spurts and then Perry sprinted 35 
yards to Williston's goal. The try for goal wa.s 
unsuccessful. Time was called with Aggie ball on 
Williston territory. 



The teams lined up as follows : 

AGGIES. POSITION. WILLISTONS. 

Drury, left end right, Sands 

Duffleld, left tackle right. Tyler 

Burrington, left guard right, Mayher 

Howard, center, Bishop 

Boardman, right guard left, Penfield 

Henderson, right tackle left, Strong 

Manley, right end left. Gait 
Putnam, quarterback, Keator (Capt.) 

Pen-y (Capt. ) | ^^^^ f Hitchcock 

Bagg, J (^ Chapman 

Dav°s%3, } ^"'1 "^=''«' Fletcher 

Score, Aggie 22, Williston 12. Touchdown— Tyler 1. 
Keator 1, Bagg 1, Perry 3. Goals — Fletcher 2, Perry 3. 
Referee, Leach of Williston. Umpire, McKee of Spring- 
field Christian Training School. 

M. A. C. 62 ; Boston Unitersitt 0. 
Sat., Oct. 29, Aggie met Boston University on 
the campus and, as the score shows, proved too 
strong for them. B. U. started off with the ball, 
but soon lost it and Aggie scored her first touch<lown 
inside of three minutes. This kind of play contin- 
ued throughout the whole game, the ball never ap- 
proaching Aggie goal nearer than the thirty-yard 
line. Jackson and Flower did the best work for 
Boston while the long runs of Perry, Bagg, and 
Manley were the features of the home team. The 
blocking, tackling and the snap of the Aggies was 
also very commendable. The work of the Univer- 
sity team showed lack of training. They have not 
the advantage of a campus, and their practice 
grounds are so inconveniently distant that they can- 
not work together every day. Their men are not 
hardened down to fooiball and several were seri- 
ously injured, but they took it all good nnturedly 
and certainly are due much credit for their efforts 
when we consider the difficulties under which they 
labor. The teams : — 

M. A. C. POSITION. 

Manley, right end left, 



BOSTON. 

f Sanborn 
1 Barry 

Henderson, right tackle left, \ Ci'ockett 

" l Perkms 

Boardman, right guard left, Whitney 

Howard, center, Maloney 

Burrington, left guard right, Schencks 

Duffield, left tackle right, Rogers 

Drury, Melendy, left end right, Phillips 

Tinoco, quarter back, Coyle, Jackson 

BagJ;} '^^'''^^^- i^orer"' 

Davis, full back, Spear 

Referee, C. A. Goodrich of Aggie, Umph'e, Meredith of 
B. U. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



45 



Amherst 22 ; Aggie 4. 

The third game with Amherst was played on 
Pratt Field, Tuesdaj- Oct. 25, and resulted in ;i de- 
feat for our team. Amherst opened with the ball 
and with a rush soon gained 30 yards and by a 
sprint it was on the 5 yard line from which Gould 
scored a touchdown. 

Aggie gains by a V and Btigg, Perry and Hender- 
son advance tlie ball, Perry scoring. Baldwin and 
H. Pratt carried the ball to the 10 yard line and G. 
Pratt pushed it across the line for a touchdown. 

Aggie succeeded in carrying the ball to within 
three yards of Amherst's goal, made no gain and 
the ball went to Amherst hut on account of a fum- 
ble Aggie soon had the ball. Unable to gain the 
5 yards Amherst again had the ball but time was 
called before they could score. 

Amherst lost the ball on four downs and Pratt 
made a long punt. Perry gains 8 yards but was 
unable to carry the ball farther and Aggie lost the 
ball. Goodale by a long run touches the ball down 
and soon after Baldwin, by another run of 35 yards 
scored a touchdown. 

The Aggie Vs gained every time and Amherst 
seemed to be weak in attempting to stop them. 
Amherst showed a weakness in blocking, tackling 
and breaking through the line and in the latter 
point Aggie did exceedingly well. Bagg, Perry 
and Davis did the principal work for Aggie and H. 
Pratt, G. Pratt and Haskell for Amherst. The 
summary : 

Amherst. 
Kosa. 
Baldwin, 
Haskell, 
Edgell, 
Stone, \ 
Cauthers, 1 
Nourse, 
Russell, 
H. L. Pratt, 
Goodale, 
Gould, 

Ellis, j (. .Bagg 

G. D. Pratt, full back, Davis 

Score— Amherst, 22 ; Aggie, 4. Touchdowns — Gould, 
G. D. Pratt, Goodale, Baldwin, Perry. Goals from touch- 
downs— G. D. Pratt, 3. Umpire— Mr. Hamilton, Amherst. 
Referee— Mr. Goodrich, Aggie. Time — 40m. 



Alu 



mm 



otfs. 





Aggie. 


left end right. 


Manley 


left tackle right. 


Henderson 


left guard right, 


Boardman 


Centre, 


Howard 


right guard left. 


Burrington, 


right tackle left, 


Duffleld 


right end left. 


Drury 


quarter back. 


Putnam 


I half backs \ 


Perry 



'78. — Arthur A. Brigham, professor of agriculture 
at the Sapporo College, Japan, announces the birth 
of a daughter. 

'80. — W. C. Parker served as sub-agent on the 
committees of music and oratory in arranging for 
the Columbian celebration in Boston, Oct. 21st. 

'81. — Prof. C. D. Warner has received a check 
for $1 ,300 from the Travelers' Ins. Co. for an injured 
leg. 

'89. — Dwight A. Hubbard, at present in the office 
of the city engineer, Boston, visited here last week. 

'92. — F. G. Stockbridge is employed as secretary 
and local manager for the Dickinson Coal Mining 
Co., Dickinson, North Dakota. 

'92. — H. M Thomson, Ass't Agriculturist at 
the Hatch Station, has been collecting samples of 
soils in this and other sections of the Connecticut 
river valley. 



Schillare's 
Photographic Studio. 



Harvard Annex has over 300 students this year. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIX STJtEUT, 



NOKTHAMPTON, MASS. 



46 



AGGIE LIFK. 



BAND STAND ACCOUNT. 
treasdrer's report. 

Subscriptions from Faculty and Alumni, $61.00 

'92 9.50 

'93 15.75 

'94 24.00 

'95 15.00 



$125.25 



Paid Wm. E. Smith, carpenter, $125.00 



$125.00 

Balance to footliall association, .25 



$125.25 
RespeelfuUj' submitted, 

C. A. Smith, Treasurer. 



PROHIBITION CLUB. 

Last Friday evening interested students of M. 
A. C. assembled for the purpose of forming a pro- 
hibition club. The following officers were elected : 
Pre.sident, A. E. Meleudy, vice-president, E. A 
Hawkes, secretary, F. H. Henderson, treasurer, J. 
H. Putnam. 

The aim of tnis club is the advancement of the 
Prohibition movement in the college. Those whose 
sympathy is with the movement should not fail to 
join and let their influence be felt. 



INTERCOLLEGIA TE. 

Cornell i.s to have a lacrosse team this year. 

Amherst's new half-backs, Ellis and Goodale, are 
from Lake Forest University. 

Yale has received over $2,000,000 in gifts and 
bequests during the past year. 

Ninety-four of the one hundred teachers in the 
Chicago University will be Ameriqans. 

The triennial catalogue of Yale has been pub- 
lished in English instead of Latin as formerly. 

The University of Michigan receives students 
without examination from 82 preparatory schools. 

Five Chinese students, two women and three men, 
enter Ann Arbor this year to take the medical 
course. 

Ground has been broken at Hanover on the new 
athletic field presented to Dartmouth College by the 
alumni. 



Two hundred and four of the three hundred and 
sixty-five colleges in the United States are co- 
educational. 

Wyoming College recently attempted a foot-ball 
game by electric light. The exhibition proved a 
complete farce. 

The faculty of the University of New York gave 
tiie students four days vacation during the recent 
Columbian celebration. 

Eight hundred Yale men met Monday night and 
formed a Republican club. Its marching club will 
be called the Depew Battalion. 

Ex-President Andrew D. White of Cornell, a 
Yale graduate of '53 has received the appointment 
of Minister Plenipotentiary to Russia. 

Yale is to have a new telescope. It is to be built 
by Clark at Cambridge and will cost $50,000. The 
glass is to be 28 in. and will be one of the best ever 
constructed. 



j^. :k. 



INSTRUCTOR IN 



la now formiug a class in dancing for i\I. A. C. men. There will be 
an advanced division for those who can dance already, in which the 
latest dances will be taught. For terms inquire at my Hall. 

;e®"Members of my former classes as well as the present ones 
can obtain admission cards to the Receptions by applying at the Hall. 

Residence and Hall, Dickinson's Block. ^ 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 
Flit ST CLASS GOOUS. PRICES 10 W. 

13 SOUTH couleige:. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 



and Carpet Reiiovatii Estalilisiiiiisiit, 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



47 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you Itnow that we are 

HuailiiiiartBrs M Mum Supplies. 

" Lamps and Lafiip Goods are Ours." 

WILT^IAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED ^i SALE STABLE, 

T. L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. A. 



DEALER IN 



WftTGHES, CIiOC^S, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS. 

TINE BTJITIQHERY. 
REPAIRING NEATLY ^m ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



fi, 0. PEfiSE 







-A-lvIIiEIlS X , 



3yC-A-SS- 



INITTATED. 

What ails our friend with darlcened eye, 
Why does he limp so sorely by, 
Is he a star in football then, 
Has he to a rush or fire been? 
Not football, fires, rushes then, 
'Twas none of these my worthy friend. 
But this young man with clouded brow, 
Joined a fraternity I trow. 



TO FRESHMEN. 

A piece of blank paper, a pencil, and pen. 
Should offer no hardship to ambitious men, 
A suitable subject, some thoughts on the same. 
And rising young authors win honor and fame. 



It was quite a big feat for a man 
To bring me back safely to land, 
From the eddie's fierce whirl ; 
But to her the feat seemed small, 
Yet this is not strange at all. 
For she was a Chicago girl. 



C. A. S. 



NOTICES. 



Mails leave the college for the post-office at 1 p. M. and 
7-40 P. M. on week days. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-ofl3ce mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Springfield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massa- 
chusetts, 7-45, 10-45, A. M. 4 00, 6-45 p. M. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-46 a. 
M. 4-00, 6 45 p. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 46, 8-30 p. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. M. 

The President will be at his office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurei- will be at his office from 3 to 5 
p. M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the term. 

The college libiai'v will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 

The museum of natural history will be open to 
visitors from 4-30 to 5-30 p. m. Mondays, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays; from 3 to 4 p.m.- Wednesdays, 
and Fridays. Will be closed Saturdays and 
Sundays. 



48 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes I! Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Slieet ]S/[iisic, 



Music Books, 



Strings 

FOR the: violin, banjo, ouixar, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 



,^ DENTISTS. 5,.. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CXTXLMJt'S BLOCK, AMBEJtST'MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
9 A.. Ti/L. TO 5 F. 3S^. 

Ether and Nitrf)us Oxide administered when desired. 



E. K. BENNETT, 



Jeweler, 



ician. 



Watchmaker. 



PINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PBTSICIANS' PJtMSCniPTIONS CAMjePTII,I,T 
COMPOUNDED, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PH.-IRMACY, 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your GQ&JSt here. 



WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODGETT k CLARK'S 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



Far Buits and Fall Qvercaats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 

FINE ITAL AND FAIEMCE LAiPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, 12.00, $2.50 and $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O. G. COUCM & SON'S. 



FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseaf, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cooh's Block, Amherst, Mass, 



-LJ- y^ 



~\ 



H 







DEUEL'S DIG 

Amlierst House Block, - Amiierst, lass, 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHEKST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

TANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cavtrklges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield KiBes. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi(len''.e, first iloor west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850- 



1892. 



THE JPHCTH &E,iLFHSR. 

NEW SKY LIOHT. 
ENUARQEID OPEIRATING ROOM. 

CLASS AN8) SOCIETY GEOUPS A SPECIALTY. 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



^. g. DI(?HI(MgO!^, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Offico Hour?), 1) to 12 a. m., l-;tO to 5 p. M. 



^^Ether ami Nitrons Oxide Gas ailmiiiistered when 
desired. 



A.T THE 



AMHERST GASH SHOE STBREi 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

JAMES' E. STINSON, 



CASH ROW,, AMHEKST, MASS. 




A. GLYNN, 


4" A -. ^ 


\ 

7^ 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



IWilitapy Suits and Trimmings. 



llassachuseits Aaricultural Colleae 



I li llH^rr'-V TiMl 





c - ^ ^ ^ 



AGGIE LIFE 



AMHERST, MABB., NOV. IE, 1632. 



TTDL. III. Nd. S. 



Carp^n"t|r 



rf nousf , 



BRIMTERS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRlGULTURy\L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform tlie friends of tlie college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fi'uits, address. 

Prof. S, T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



m AlERST 

FUpOflE /ND CARPET 

STOjELS. 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, STUDY 
DES KS AND CHAIRS, L OUNGES. 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 



C. H. SANDERSON & CO., 



CASH DEALEKS IM 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



SyiNDEI|SOfi k THOMPSOf(, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



iOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVKBTBODY. 



CARPETS , RUGS, ETC., ETC. 

All Goods STB,IGTLir CASH and at 
I.OWEST PKICSS. 

E. 13. MARSH, 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ISTJEBE2S <3-003DS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



KEFA-IRIKIO- IDOISTB I=K.OIvIFTX,~5£"- 



T. W. SLOAN, 

2 PHOSNIX ROW. 



^J , 



'raeikal Pkiriiber, 

SJEA/n AND GAS FITJEH. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heating a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., NOVEMBER 16, 1892. 



No. 5 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $t,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Oflce as second-class mail matter. 

BO^MD 0£' MDITORS: 

G. F. CURLEY, '1)3, Editor-in-Chief, 

J. E. PERRY, '93, Business Manager, 

B. 0. HOWARD, '93, E. S. HOYT, '93, 

A. E. MELENDY, '93. C. F. WALKER, '94, 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

T. P. FOLEY, '95. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



rsais. 



It has l)een a noticeable fact that recitation 
rooms have been unusually cold thus far this term 
especiallj- in the rootrs in South College. There 
seems to be no excuse for this, as in past years such 
has not been so constantly the case. If the trouble 
lies in the boilers or other apparatus then the de- 
fect should be remedied, as it is against the princi- 
ples of modern ventilation to close the windows of 
a room and depend altogether on animal heat for 
warmth. Yet this is the process that is repeated 
morning after morning, and if no change is made, 
overcoats will find but little rest in the wardrobes 
this winter. 



In the course of study laid out in the catalogue, 
meteorology occupies two hours in the winter term 
of the Senior year. To some few, perhaps, this 
branch may be of special interest but we think that 
the number is very small. Why can we not have 
in the place of it a short course in Astronomy? As- 



tronomy is a study which would prove of interest to 
all and it is pre-eminently one of the natural sciences, 
and as a college of science, does it not seem a little 
strange that no attention is given to it in our course 
of study ? It is surely one of the most interesting 
of the sciences, were such an addition to be made 
to the course, the move would be heartily appre- 
ciated by the student body. 



Ddking the past week several newspapers of the 
state have commented in their columns upon the 
generosity of a rich western farmer who donated a 
large sum of money to the agricultural college of 
his state in recognition of the good the institution 
was doing for agriculture and the farmer. Gener- 
ally speaking, the success of the college or univer- 
sity of today is largely determined by its private 
endowments. Pjvery now and then we read in the 
papers of some rich college graduate who has don- 
ated thousands of dollars to his alma mater. His 
name is published far and wide and when he dies 
a statue is erected to his memory. But however 
well private institutions are thus endowed the agri- 
cultural and mechanical colleges seem from the start 
to have been forgotten in this distribution of wealth. 
Now and then we hear of a state college receiving 
a gift of money or real estate, but such instances 
as the one above cited, are few and far between. 
It is wrong to suppose that because an institution 
derives its support largely from the public treasury, 
that it is without need of further financial aid, and 
yet such is the idea prevalent among many who be- 
lieve in agricultural colleges, and who are interested 
in the work they are doing. Here is a good oppor- 
tunity for the rich men of Massachusetts who are 
really interested in the promotion of agriculture to 
invest their money to good advantage. The M. A. 
C. is doing a great work for the state, but its labors 
could be made of much greater value if it received 
aid from other sources than the government. 



5° 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Now that the college year is well underway, it 
seems just to expect that competition for positions 
on the Life Board will commence at once. If those 
underclassmen who desire to be editors, will stop to 
consider, thej' will find that the number of issues to 
be gotten out by the present board is limited, and 
thus there is but little time left for them to show 
their ability in literary work. The contributions 
which we get form the only advisable means of de- 
termining the eligible men in each class. From the 
Freshman class there is to be chosen one editor. 
This seems unimportant to many, but after all, this 
man is liable to be on the board longer than any of 
his classmates, and thus too much moment cannot 
be placed on getting the best man. In choosing 
this man, not only the best writer is considered, 
but also the man who has fair literary abilities and 
an evident willingness to work. Now if the best 
writer in the class will show by frequent contribu- 
tions that he means to do all he can to benefit the 
college paper, then he is just the man to be selected. 
This same principle applies to the Sophomore and 
Junior classes. We want the best men in college 
for the Life board, therefore let faithful individual 
work be done in the following issues, and while all 
cannot be editors, those who are unsuccessful will 
have the consolation of feeling that better men than 
themselves are on the board, and that the standard 
of the Life is as high as possible with the existing 
literarj' ability of the college. 



With the hope that consideration may be given 
the matter by the students, and especially those in 
authority in the military department, we once more 
revive the matter of the visitation of the students to 
the World's Fair, in a body. Let us first consider 
the plan which was discussed to some extent last 
spring and which if carried out would be preferable 
to anything that has thus far been proposed. It is 
that our battalion in connection with those of sister 
institutions in other states make an encampment at 
Chicago and constitute one of the objects of inter- 
est of the World's Fair. This plan has been favor- 
ably considered by other Agricultural colleges and 
it would seem that if we as one of the most promi- 
nent agricultural institutions should make the first 
move, the accomplishment of the plan could be 
effected. If this plan proves impracticable, it 



would be very advantageous to the students if it 
could be arranged for the college to visit the Fair 
in a body. Such an arrangement would secure for 
us many privileges which we as individuals could 
not obtain ; some which suggest themselves at once 
being, reduced rates in transportation, saving in 
cost of accommodations at Chicago, and opportu- 
nities for special study in certain departments of 
the Fair. The matter has been discussed by the 
students and it is the almost universal desire to visit 
the Fair in this way. There are some of the stu- 
dents who feel that they cannot afford to visit the 
Fair, owing to the heavy expenses which the trip 
would cost. Either of these plans would enable 
nearly every one to avail himself of the exceptional 
opportunity of acquiring information which the 
Fair will offer and which no young man, especially, 
can afford to lose. 



©n%rsDvi 



SOME ATHLETICS ARE BRUTAL, SEL- 
FISH, AND DANGEROUS TO LIFE! 

The writer realizes that this contribution will 
probably create criticism. He desires to state that 
as this writing puts him on record forever, so will 
whatever be said in criticism be eternal. 

According to Webster, an athlete is one who 
contends for a prize. So the ordinary acceptance 
of the term is not broad ; we are all athletes con- 
tending for the prize of a successful and honorable 
life. The Rugby game of foot-ball as played at M. 
A. C. was organized in the fall of 1878, by Francis 
Codman of the class of 1880, a gentleman of family 
and culture, whose early death his friends still 
lament. The fall of 1879, a fifteen from Aggie 
plaj'ed one from the Amherst Freshmen, in which 
game Williams, '82, scored the only touch-down. 
The fall of 1880, the team was under the captaincy 
of Arthui' Whittaker of '81, and pl.iyed some good 
games with Williston. The fall of 1881, Williams, 
'82, was captain ; a good record as to winning 
games was made ; the team went to Middletown, 
Conn., to play Wesleyan ; Williams' fame had pre- 
ceded him, and a concerted effort was made to do 
him up ; in the early part of the first half his shoul- 
der was dislocated ; he managed to reduce it ; it 



AGGIE LIFE. 



51 



was soon again dislocated, then needing assistance 
from one of the team to reduce it ; but the lliird 
dislocation soon followed, and a medical man was 
called in who had to resort to an anaesthetic. M. 
A. C, however, did up Wesleyan in splendid shape 
and the day was ours. Result : Great glory and 
happiness at M. A. C. Williams has a shoulder 
which will never be perfect this side of the grave. 

The fall of 1882 the team again played Wesleyan 
and at Springfield : Wesleyan put a strong team 
against Aggie with the result of defeat for the 
potato-diggers and two men laid up with dislocated 
knee-joints from which they also will never recover. 

I. Brdtal. All athletics are brutal that result 
in such damage to joints as above recorded ; but it 
is said that these accidents happen elsewhere ; the 
elevated railroads carry daily five hundred thousand 
passengers ; an accident to life or limb is extremely 
rare ; a recent number of Aggie Life calmly states 
that two men of the team are laid up with injured 
knee joints ; from information I obtain from the 
daily press I do not find any diminution of the biu- 
tality that existed in foot-ball played for the purpose 
of winning games. 

II. Selfish. It is utterly selfish in the students 
of any institution to demand that a certain number 
of their fellows should play match games with the 
results that have been noted. I have been recently 
told by a graduate of Harvard that foot-ball had 
improved the physical condition of the students that 
play against the regular teams ; if the health of a 
number of men must be conserved by having organ- 
ized teams to play against, and these teams obtain 
the results that I have noted, I consider that such 
conservation of health is obtained on selfish grounds 
and is not right. 

III. Dangerous to Life. A man is not a man 
till he is twenty-five years of age ; college men will 
please not rebel against this fact. Until twenty-five 
all the bones of the body have not reached then- 
maturity ; from fifteen to twenty-five years of age is 
a man's critical period of life ;during that time med- 
ical men know that when sick the patient either goes 
down fast or comes up fast ; while if past the age 
of maturing of the skeleton, there is a greater tough- 
ness and resiliency, and while a cure of an acute or 
chronic disease may not be made so fast as in some 
adolescents, yet it is more certain. A student in 



college is in the most critical period of his life ; he 
has a certain amount of mental and psychological 
drill that taxes his capacities of nerve force to a 
considerable extent ; the remainder of nerve foice 
must be used in making his body ; this body is to 
carry him through all tlie trials of life, and to old 
age if rightly handled. Yet he takes upon himself 
a heavier load, that of athletics ; not content with 
right physical training he becomes an athlete, 
striving for the prize of lowering a record or beating 
with his team some other institution ; the result is 
that mt'dical men are made busy endeavoring to 
repair diseased hearts, livers, kidneys and lungs all 
of which are difficult jobs, needing much time, 
patience, and expense, and, though thanks to im- 
provements and progress in the divine art of healing, 
a greater percentage of such cases are curable, yet 
physicians would rather the cause be taken away. 

I have seen weak women sick with chronic 
disease recover, when a noted athlete similarly 
diseased did not because his nerve forces had been 
used up in training. A noted athlete, when sick with 
what ought to have been cured in a few months, 
took two years to regain his health. A splendid 
specimen of approaching manhood in college, who 
used to ride his machine many miles dailj', became 
a miserable case of neurasthenia, a curse to himself 
and family, and is hardly out of the woods now. 
The most desperate case of consumption I have seen 
in the last three years was in a prize winner, bugler 
and militiaman. 'I'he means used in his case, which 
ordinarily would partly (ir wholly arrest the course 
of disease had no effect on him. The papers had 
much to say of the death of the son of a noted mil- 
lionare, of typhoid fever; it seemed to me that this 
young man's vitality had been sapped by too much 
athletics, and when the poison of typhoid gained 
access to his system he had not enough strength to 
combat it, and succumbed. The same occurs in 
those who overwork with books ; who have much 
care to distress them. 

But this paper must be short ; if criticism follows 
and there is need of replies from me, I am ready 
with my evidence. 

To conclude : I am opposed to any and all ath- 
letics that result in injured joints, tendons and 
muscles and broken bones ; the only exception is 
when one strives for the prize of saving a life, as in 



52 



AGGIE LIFE. 



a rescue of human beings at a fire, etc., and injures 
himself thereby. I am opposed to any and all 
athletics that help some at the expense of others. 
I am opposed to any and all athletics that sap the 
vitality, the constitution, the nerve force, the 
dynamos, that is the life, that governs all actions of 
all tissues of the body. 

Dr. Sargent of the Harvard Gymnasium in an 
article ))ublished some months ago in the Cosmopol- 
itan Magazine, if my memory serves me rightly, 
stated that physical traming and athletics are two 
different things; I regretted that he did not then 
give an authoritative opinion on the dangers of our 
present system of athletics ; if he has since done so 
J shall be glad to hear it ; if not, I call upon him to 
give an opinion why I should derive part of my 
bread and butter in endeavoring to undo the deadly 
mischief accomplished by some athletics. What I 
would substitute I propose to state in another 
communication. 

John A. Cotter, M. D., '<S2. 



THE OTHER SIDE. 



No doulit the above article hardly comcides with 
the views held by college boys, and while it may 
sound like the ant who said to the elephant, "Who 
are you shoving? " to differ with the able physician 
whose article we publish, the sentiment of every 
college student is so strong on the side of his favorite 
sport, that a few words in vindication of the college 
game of foot-ball, seem called for. 

The chief point brought forward is that a large 
percentage of the men participating in the sport are 
injured to such an extent as to disable them, partially 
at least, for the remainder of th( ir natural lives. 
We do not deny that accidents happen, but we do 
claim that the benefit derived is sufficient to offset 
the.'*e occasional mishaps. Not a single accident 
which has permanently injured any man, either on 
our team or our opponents', has happened in the 
twelve games played thus far this season by the 
Aggie team, and the benefits dei'ived have been 
numerous. First, we have come into a closer union 
and relationship with other colleges through our 
foot-ball team than would be possible in anv other 
way, and from the rivalry of the athletic field, 
friendships have sprung up between our institution 



and its competitors, which will be felt for many 
years. 

Dr. Cutter's article condemns athletic competition 
on the ground that occasional accidents happen. 
We are believers in the old proverb, "Nothing ven- 
ture, nothing have." The man who succeeds best 
in this life is the one who takes some risks, and this 
is as true on the athletic field as it is in business 
life. While it is possible to attain robust physical 
manhood by means of exercise in which there is no 
competition of man vrith man, or team with team, 
very few indeed are the men who avail themselves 
of these forms of physical culture. Evidently the 
doctor has been carried away by the newspaper pre- 
judice against the game, for if he had taken the 
trouble to go to some field where to-daj^'s game of 
foot-ball was being played by college men, he would 
hear the admonition of the coach, not to "slug" as 
fine points of play will be lost, and this advice is 
carried out in most cases, to the very letter. In but 
one game this year has the Aggie team played where 
unwarranted roughness on the i)art of its opponents 
was noticed, while even within the memory of men 
now in college, certain forms of roughness were at 
a premium. Surely he must be willing to retract his 
statement "That there has been no diminution of 
the brutality that existed in foot-ball played for the 
purpose of winning games." With regard to his 
second point we claim that the game is not selfish, 
for the men who take pail do so voluntarily. If the 
health of the men who play against the legular 
teams is helped, as is conceded in Dr. Cutter's arti- 
cle, it follows that the general health of the mem- 
bers of the first team will also be improved. 

Robust exercise of th.? body is necessary for a 
balanced development of the mind, and no exercise 
is as beneficial as one which is enjoyed by the one 
who is taking part. Conversation with many old 
foot-ball players has proved that they look back to 
the time spent on the gridironed field as the pleas- 
antest hours of their college life, and they lay the 
fact of the sturdy physical health which they now 
enjoy, to the work done necessary to win games 
upon the foot-ball and base-ball field. 

In the doctor's article, he says, "The only excep- 
tion is when one strives for tiie prize of saving a 
life." Let mo remind him of the case of Ralph 
Brokaw, the young Princeton athlete who so nobly 



AGGIE LIFE. 



53 



sacrifleed his life to save tliat of a j'oung lady, on 
the New Jersey coast a year ago last summer. A 
finely developed young man, his muscles in the best 
condition from his recent training as catcher of his 
college base-ball team, having just the strength to 
save the life of the young lady, but not enough to 
save his own, tiiis strength, which he used to so 
noble an end, was tlie result of athletic training. 
This type of manhood is more common in our Amer- 
ican colleges than is generally supposed, and what 
can better bring out those qualities of uhysical en- 
durance, quick thought, and prompt action in an 
emergency, than the training for sturdy, manly 
athletics ? 

E. C. HowAKD, '93. 



FOOT-BALL. 
M. A. C, 12; Mt. Hermon, 12. 

The college team went to Northfield, last Wed- 
nesday and met the Mt. Hermon team for the sec- 
ond time this season. The score at the end i>f the 
first half was 12-12, and Mt. Hermon scored the 
first tonchdown and goal in the second half. Aggie 
forced herself to Mt. Harmon's 10-yard line when 
Henderson carried the ball over and in endeavoring 
to touch it behind the goal posts, slipped and fum- 
bled, and a Hermonite dropped on it. The teams 
lined up on Aggie 25-yard line. Mt. Hermon's 
ball, and the sphere was fumbled several times, 
Aggie each time dropped upon the ball, but the 
referee did not see fit to regard Aggie's claims. 
This thing became no longer endurable, and Capt. 
Perry, seeing justice was denied him, after honest 
explanations, withdrew his team from the field. 

The features of the game were the end plays of 
Perry and Bagg and the plunging and blocking of 
Mt. Hermon's backs. Mt. Hermon outweighed 
Aggie, and bucked their line in nearly every in- 
stance, while Aggie could hardly gain at all through 
their line. Nearly all Mt. Hermon's gains were 
made by beef, after the runner was fairly held, they 
seemed to not exert themselves to any extent in 
pushing our team. The teams lined up as follows : 

AGGIE. MT. HERMON. 

Melendy, left end right, Johnson 

Drury, left tackle right, Bazarian 

Burrington, left guard right, Sipperly 

Howard, center, Lotz 



right guard left, 


Kellogg 


right tackle left, 


Morrell 


riglit end left. 


Crowell 


quarter back. 


Hall 


half back. 


( Hatch 



Boardman, 
Henderson, 
Manley, 
Tinoco, 
Perry, \ 

Bagg, j """ """'°-' I Fulton 

Davis, full back, Calhoun (Capt.) 

Touchdowns — PeiTy 2, Fulton, Crowell, Hatch. Goals 
—Davis 2, Calhoun 3. Umpire, C. A. Goodrich, M. A. C. 
'93. Referee, Mr. Class, Greenfield. Time, 47 min. 

Y. M. C. A. Training School, 18 ; M.A.C., 16. 

The Young Men's Ctiristian Association Tiainiug 
School .team defeated Aggie at Amherst 18 to 16 in 
the best game of the season on the Aggie campus 
Both teams played their hardest, and Springfield's 
tricks were too much for Aggie's scientific playing 
and team work. Tlie fact that the Aggie trainer is 
a training school man gave the visitors a general 
idea of the style of play. Aggie opened with the 
ball and made eight yards on a V, but immediately 
fumbled. Foster made 15 yards and in the follow- 
ing wedge the Aggies did not let them gain an inch, 
althougii the Springfield line was slightly the heavier. 
Archibald gained four yards through the line, and 
in the punt which followed the Aggie referee allow- 
ed the ball to be carried inside 13 yards nearer the 
Aggie goal The Springfields fumbled and Davis 
plunged 10 yards through the line. Bagg sprinted 
for 15 yards. Aggie soon lost the ball which 
changed hands often, the Springfields working slow- 
ly up to Aggie territory and the Aggies by a few 
long runs carrying it as near the Springfield ground 
several times. Five minutes from the end of the 
half the Springfields tired of bucking the Aggie cen- 
ter with their half-backs and unsuccessful around 
the ends, played their center back of the line, and 
his weight sent him nearer Aggie territory. They 
fumbled on the Aggies five-yard line, but the home 
team failed to gain and in return lost the ball. 
Archibald plunged five yards and scored the first 
touchdown. No goal. Score 4 to 0. Aggie woke 
up and in three minutes scored on the Springfields, 
Perry taking the bail over. No goal. Score 4 to 4. 
The Sprini>fields started with the center trick and 
Page went the length of the field and scored. No 
goal. Score 8-4. Aggie carried the ball danger- 
ously near the Springfield's goal when the half ended. 

The Springfields opened the second half with 
another trick and followed with many small gains 
until Page scored a touchdown. Foster failed at 



54 



AGGIE LIFE. 



goal. Score 12 to 4. Aggie sent Perry out of the 
wedge for 15 yards and bucked the center for sev- 
eral small gains. The ball was lost, but soon 
obtained again by a fumble. This was repeated 
again on the Springfield's 25-yards line. Finally 
Perry sprinted 15 yards, Davis plunged lOandBagg 
scored. Davis kicked a goal, score 12 to 10. The 
Springfields helped Page 45 yards down the field 
and after small line gains he was pushed over, scor- 
ing the final for the Springfiields. Foster kicked a 
goal, score 18 to 10. Aggie opened with the wedge 
and after successive gaius Henderson scored. 
Davis kicked a goal. Score 18 to 16. The rem.iin- 
der of the half the Springfields were kept on their 
own territory. The features for the visitors' game 
was the sprinting of Page and the l)locking of the 
team. For the Aggies, the playing of Davis and 
tht tackles, and the sprinting of Bagg and Perry 
were excellent. The teams lined up as follows : 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Hikiner, left end right, 

Archibald, left tackle right, 

Wall, left guard right, 

Morgan, Page, center, 

Stephens, right guard left, 

Black, right tackle left. 



Mahan, 
Smith, 
McKee, \ 
Foster, / 
Naismith (capt.). 



right end left, 
quarter back, 

half backs, 

full back, 



AGGIES. 

Manley 

Henderson 

Boardman 

Howard, '93 

Burriiigton 

Duffleld 

Melendy 

Tinoco 

I Perry (capt.) 

1 Bagg 

Davis, '93 



Score, 18-16. Touchdowns — Archibald, Paige 3, Perry, 
Bagg, Henderson. Goals from touchdowns — Naismith, 
Davis 2. Umpire, Goodrich of M. A. C. Referee, Kinni- 
cut of Springfield. Time, 1 h. 

Harvard, '96, 46 ; M. A. C, 12. 
The game with Harvard F'reshmen resulteil in an 
easy victory for '96. This was accomplished by 
their own excellent play and the poor work of the 
Aggie rush line. '96 found no trouble in making 
holes at all points in the line and also made large 
gains around the ends. In justice to Aggie it 
should be said, however, that the '96 eleven was 
much superior in weight, and the ground very muddy 
and slippery. The game opened with '96 ball. 
They advanced steadily down the field and scored 
in about five minutes. No goal. Aggie took the 
ball at the center of the field and gained a little. 
The ball changed hands several times near the cen- 
ter of the field tiut Harvard soon scored again ; goal. 



Another score for Harvard in the same manner ; no 
goal. Aggie got 26 yards on a foul tackle but could 
not keep the ball. '96 advanced to Aggie's 40-j'ard 
line where Henderson got the ball on a fumble and 
ran to Harvard's goal through a cbar field; goal. 
'96 made three more touchdowns and two goals dur- 
ing this half. Aggie made very little resistance. 

Aggie opened the second half by forcing the ball 
down the field and scoring ; goal. Then the old 
story began again of Aggie failing to gain and '96 
scoring. Aggie tackled very poorly and the '96 
rushers went through them easily. The final score 
was 46-12. Perry aud Bagg did the best work for 
Aggie and it is wonderful that they gained at all, so 
easily did the opposing line get through at them. '96 
had her best team on the field and they played like 
veterans. Their blocking was the finest Aggie has 
met this year. The teams lined up as follows : 

Harvard, '96. M. A. C. 

Richardson, left end right, Manley 

Lewis, left tackle right, Henderson 

Worden, left guard right, Boardman 

Russell, center, Howard 

Rice, right guard left, Burriugton 

Clark, right tackle left, Duffleld 

Brewer, right end left, Melendy 

Borden, quarter back, Tinoco 

Arnold, I ( Perry 

BuUard, V half backs, .j 

Gould, J I Bagg 

Fennessy, full back, Davis 
Score, Harvard Freshmen 46; M. A. C. 12. 



There is a movement on foot to exhibit all frater- 
nity badges, catalogues, magazines aud pictures of 
fraternity houses at the World's Fair. Provision 
has been made for such in the department of Lib- 
eral Arts. 



A round trip to the World's Fair has been offered 
to tiie memljer of the U. of Penn. eleven .scoring 

the most points against opponents this season. 

^ 

Yale, Johns Hopkins, Cornell, Dartmouth and 
the Uuiversities of Michigan and JMinnesota are the 
only American colleges possessing Y. M. C. A. 

buildings. 

«^ 

The majority of the Life exchanges have an- 
nounced the formation next year of the Aggie- 
Boston University-Worcester Tech. triangular foot- 
ball league. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



55 



^oye;^f ^ot^S. 



— Did you get your bill? 

— Wheelbarrows are in great demand. 

— Lieut. Cornish was in town recently. 

— The tennis tournament is at an end. 

— H. F. Staples, '93, spent Sunday of last week 
at home. 

— The work on the dam is making satisfactory 
progress. 

— Senior "quiz" in Agricultural Chemistry the 
rest of the week. 

— Slaters have been at work on the college build- 
ings the past week. 

— Quite a number of alumni were present at the 
game at Cambridge. 

— Some are inquiring "Is there to be a singing 
school this winter?" 

— Several men from college went home on the 
8th to save the country. 

— Squad and platoon drill in extended order was 
the program last week. 

— Prof. Maynard is acting president during the 
absence of Pres. Goodell. 

— Moustaches are missing and stubble beards ap- 
pear ; cause, election bets. 

— Several students aecompanied the eleven to 
Northfield last Wednesday. 

— A quartet, from the glee club, sang at a Lev- 
erett Republican rally, Nov. 9. 

— Prof. Mills now has charge of the College clock 
and will see that it does not lag in the future. 

— A large order for college buttons has been sent 
in and they will soon be ready for distibution. 

— The orchestra will play at the Annual Ball held 
by Co. K, M. V. M., in their armory, Friday. Nov. 
18. 

— The Seniors h.ad an examination in the deter- 
mination of solutions under Prof. Wellington last 
Monday. 

— Quite a number af the students will remain 
during the Thanksgiving recess and the college 
Boarding Club will accommodate those of its mem- 
bers that remain. 



— Y. M. C. A. topic cards with names of leaders 
for the year a;'e now out. Leaders will please take 
notice. 

— Once more the snow fall reminds us that Win- 
ter is almost upon us and that our football season 
is over. 

—The Athletic Association has recently placed 
wire protectors over the electric light globes in the 
drill hall. 

— Oct. 10th, '95 takes a cut on Prof. Maynard 
resulting in the suspension of several men from the 
labor fund. 

— Dr. Walker exchanged last Sunday with Rev. 
Mr. Makepeace of the North Congregational church, 
Spriiigfield. 

— Will we have electives next term? This long 
desired feature will, we hope, be soon firmly estab- 
lished in our college. 

— Quite a large number of the students have ex- 
pressed their intention to go to the Harvard-Yale 
game next Saturdav. 

— The M. A. C. football season is probably closed 
for this year. It goes without saying that it has 
been a very successsul (>ne. 

— The glee club has commenced its winter prac- 
tice under the instruction of Prof. Charmbury, who 
was their instructor last year. 

— T. F. Keith, '94, who was lately threatened 
with an attack of pneumonia, is now sufficiently re- 
covered to resume his college duties. 

— The town Democratic Club, combined with the 
M. A. C. and Amherst College Democratic Clubs, 
hold a celebration on the common to-night. 

— The farm management lias been obliged to 
refuse work to students who are not regularly em- 
ployed at the barn, on account of lack of funds. 

— Election returns were published at Old Chapel 
on Tuesday evening, telegraphic communication by 
bicycle beiug held with the headquarters at the 
village. • 

— The manner in which improvements are being 
made in the Botanic department leads one to the 
conclusion that alumni will hardly recognize the 
place when they make their annual visit at Com- 
mencement. The increased area under glass gives 
the grounds a greatly changed appearance. 



56 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The M. A. C. Independent Democratic Club 
celebrated the vi(!tory of their candidate last Friday 
evening, by firing the national salute of forty-four 
rounds. 

— Bishop Phillips Brooks spoke at the Episcopal 
church, Amherst, Sunday the 6th iust. Quite a 
number of the students took advantage of the op- 
portunity to hear him. 

— The new plant house when completed will in 
appearance be very similiar to that represented in 
the plan which appeared in one of the earlier cata- 
logues of the college. 

— It is rumored that a wooden floor is to be 
laid in the drill hall the first of the new year. It is 
certainly a much needed improvement and will be 
greatly appreciated by the students. 

— The zoological museum is becoming so crowded 
that the valuable collections which have been gath- 
ered are shown to disadvantage. The demand for 
a new museum building is imperative. 

— President Goodell left on Wednesday the 9th 
for New Orleans where he will represent the college 
at the meeting of the Association of American Agri- 
cultural Colleges and Experiment Stations. 

— Nov. 2, '95 elected the following "Index" 
board:— F. C. Tobey, Editor-in-Chief; H. L. 
Frost, Business Manager, E. O. Bagg, R. A. 
Cooley, S. Kuroda, C. B. Lane, J. Marsh, and T.P. 
Foley. 

— The approaching cold weather will soon close 
this season's target practice. The students have 
taken an unusual interest in this branch of the mili- 
tary department and very good scores have been 
made. 

—The recent snow with its accompanying mud 
and slush again recalls a long-felt and much-needed 
want,— namely, a tar walk to the college boarding 
house. Nearly a hundred men would use it three 
times a day. 

— Although the evening was stormy, there was 
a large audience at the second lecture of the Am- 
herst College lecture course, held in College hall, 
Nov. 4. Prof. Winchester proved a very inter- 
esting and attractive speaker, and in his subject, 
"Memories of the English Lakes," pictured vividly 
before the minds of his hearers the homes and sur- 
roundings of English poets and writers. 



— At a recent meeting of the Polo directors, E.H. 
Lehuert, '93 was chosen President, and S. F. How- 
ard, '94, Secretary and Treasurer. The President 
was elected captain of the Polo team and the Sec- 
retary, manager. 

— The Press Club is endeavoring to secure a lar- 
ger representation in the prominent newspapers. 
There is probably no better mode of advertising the 
college than by giving a wide circulation to care- 
fully written college notes. 

— The students having pledged to return to col- 
lege the Tuesday morning after Thanksgiving Day, 
the usual recess will be given. Exercises will be 
held the Saturday succeeding the recess to make up 
for Monday after Thanksgiving. 

— The zoological and physiological museum has 
recently received the following additions: A pair of 
artificial lungs of man, set busts of Linnaeus, Buffon, 
Cuvier, St. Hilaire, Agassiz, Humboldt, Darwin, 
and Huxley. Also busts representing the five races 
of man. 

— D. F. Carpenter, '86, who has had charge 
of the mathematical department in the absence 
of Prof. Warner, closed his duties Nov. 4. Prof. 
Warner has so far recovered that he now takes 
all his classes, and the college is to be congratulated 
on his return. 

— The Athletic association seems to be quite ac- 
tive this year. Repairs ha^e been made in the 
drill hall and other improveikeuts will probably be 
added very soon . When we consider that these 
things are being done for us, we should determine 
to use the apparatus as though it were our own. 
There is certainly no excuse for the manner in 
which chest-weighls have been mutilated the past 
two months. 

— The Y. M. C. A. training school men of 
Springfield are advocating some radical changes in 
football rules before another season. They claim 
that injuries have been increasing and urge several 
important changes with a view to lessening the 
danger of the game. Although we have had no 
serious accidents among our players this year, we 
still think that the present rules could be improved 
and we hope the efforts of the Christian Workers 
will receive the attention they deserve from all men 
interested in the advancement of college football. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



57 



— There will in all probability,, be a dancing class 
started here this winter. The scheme proved a fair 
success last winter and showed that such as are in- 
terested may become quite well acquainted with the 
graceful art in one winter. If all those that desire 
to learn or improve in dancing will cooperate in this 
class, its object will be fully accomplished. 

— The results of several important football games 
in the last two weeks are as follows : — 

Saturday, Oct. 29, — Harvard vs Amherst at 
Cambridge, 32-10 ; Princeton vs VVesleyan at New 
York, 60-0 ; University of Penn. vs Chicago Ath- 
letic Club, 12-10 ; Yale vs Tults at New Haven, 
44-0. Saturday, Nov. 5, Dartmouth vs Williams 
at Williamstown, 24-12 ; Harvard vs Cornell at 
Springfield, 20-14; Springfield Y. M. C. A. Train- 
ing School vs M. A. C- at Amherst, 18-16 ; U. of 
P. vs Princeton, 6-1. Saturday, Nov. 12, Yale vs 
U. of P. at New Haven 28-0 ; Amherst vs Dart- 
mouth at Amherst, 32-2 ; Exeter vs Andover at 
Andover, 28-18. 

— On Monday evening, Nov. 21, Mrs. Richmond 
Green, under the patronage of the Daughters of the 
King, will give in the Opera House an interpreta- 
tion of Shakespeare's "Winter's Tale." The read- 
ing will be illustrated by tableaux vivant, in which 
well-known talent from Easthamptun and Amherst 
will lake part. George William Curtis says of the 
reader: "As Mrs. Richmond Green revives these 
great dramas, putting life and blood into them, she 
makes them live as they lived in the author's brain" 
and William Gallagher Ph. D., Prin. of Williston 
Sem. expressed himself thus to Mrs. Green: "The 
clear impression of that drama left on my mind by 
your rendering, will make a future reading of it un- 
necessary." Admission, 35 cts ; Reserved Seats, 
50 cts. Tickets on sale at Deuel's Drugstore. 



'87. — William H. Caldwell, Assistant Agricul- 
turist to the Agricultural Experiment Station and 
Instructor in Agriculture in Penn. State College, is 
to have charge of the Ayrshire stock at the World's 
Fair. 

'88. — B. L. Shimer and wife announce the birth 
of a son at their home, Bethlehem, Pa. 

'90. — D. Barry is with an electric search light 
company, the Schuyler Electric Co., Middletown, 
Conn. 

'91. — W. A. Brown, ex-adjutant, visited college 
last week. He is at present employed in the oflBce 
of the City Engineer, Springfield, Mass. 

'91. — A. G. Eames has entered the Senior class 
at Cornell University, Ithaca. 

'91. — Eaton of South Sudbury spent a few days 
here the past week. 

'92.— J. L. Field, 4826 Kimball Ave., Chicago, 
111. Department Salesman, Marshall Field & Go's 
Wholesale Dry Goods, Adams, Quincy, Franklin 
and Fifth Ave's, Chicago, 111. 



Schillare's 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



The annual dinner of the New York Alumni 
Association of the M. A. C. will be held at the 
Murray Hill Hotel, Park Avenue and 41st street, 
on Wednesday, Dec. 7, at 7.00 p. m. 

'84l — Llewellyn Smith, Qninsigamond, Mass., 
Traveling Salesman, Quinnipiac Co., 7 Exchange 
Place, Boston, Mass. has been married to Miss Isa- 
bella B. Reeves. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



lOS MAIN STItMET, 



NOMTBAMPTON, MASS. 



58 



AGGIE LIFK. 



THE WASHINGTON IRVING LITERARY 
SOCIETY. 

A large proportion of the meetings of tlie W. I. 
L. S. this term have been reported as "dull and 
uninteresting." Perhaps we can attribute this laclc 
of interest to polities, which unfortunately, has 
occupied the most prominent place in our minds for 
the last lew weeks. At anjMate let us ho|)e that 
this is the cause, and now that the contest is over 
and the victory gained, let us hope for renewed in- 
terest and activity in this, the oldest organization 
in college. 

The meeting held last Friday evening presented 
quite a striking contrast to many that have been 
held this term. Notwithstanding the faSt that 
temporary officers occupied the chairs of the presi- 
dent and secretary, and the attendance was scarcely 
above the average, several debaters being absent, 
yet the meeting was characterized by the one thing 
which will give life to any cause — enthusiasm. The 
subject under discussion was "Resolved that the 
presidential term should be lengthened to eight 
years, and tliat the president should be ineligible to 
a second term of office." Tlie debaters on the 
affirmative were F. T. Harlow, '93, and Hayward, 
'96 ; negati\e. Alderman, '94 and Morse, '96. 
Although several of the speakers were unprepared, 
yet it was evident that each one tried to do his best. 
The weight of argument was decided in the affirma- 
tive, but the merits of the question, almost unani- 
mously in the negative. Pentecost, '96, gave a 
stirring extemporaneous speech, taking for his sub- 
ject "Is the "W. I.' a shining light in this college to 
the extent that it ought to be?" Merwin, '94, being 
the critic for the evening, gave his report and the 
meeting was adjourned. 

The members of the society feel much encouraged 
by the interest which was manifefeted from the be- 
ginning to the end of this meeting, but still the 
fact remains true that the majority of the students 
do not appreciate the value of this society. The 
attendance is far too small. We extend a most cor- 
dial invitation to all, especially the Freshmen, to 
join us in this work. Come, fellows, to the 'W. I.' 
and we will guarantee that one hour everj' week 
spent with us, will not be spent in vain. 



The total amount of gifts to Harvard during last 
summer amounted to $70,000. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE. 

The Daily Palo Atlo has twenty-two men on its 
staff. 

The Vassar students have appointed a committee 
whose business is to prevent the press from pub- 
lishing exaggerated stories about the customs of the 
institution. 



gK^^HOTGUM 



|fQt^ 



FOR SALE BY 



1. O. Qm^^MT, 

No. 3 Ss»utli College, 

BOX 386, AMHERST, MASS. 
All correspondence will receive prompt attention. 



INSTEUCTOK IN 

la now forming a class in dancing for M. A. C. men. There will be 
an advanced division for those who can dance already, in which the 
latest dances will be taught. For terms inquire at my Hall. 

,8S^Members of my former classes as well as the present ones 
can obtain admission cards to the Receptions by applying at the Hall. 

Residence and Hall.. Dickinson's Block. 

STUDE^^TS' SUPPLIES. 
££. J. rowx.^R. 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 
FIBST CLjLSS goods. PRICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH colle:oe:. 
AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-OperatiYe Steam Laundry ^^^ 

and Carpet Reiiovatiii Establislimeiit, 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



59 



Yes this is our space. Dou't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know tlaat we are 



lliiaiK 



'in ih 




aod Lamp Coodure Ours." 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED i SALE STABLE, 

T. L PAIGE, Prop'R 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TEAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS, FAIR PRICES. 

AMHKRST, MASS. 



DEALER IN 



WATCHES, GLOCliS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

FIHE STE-TiasrilRY. 
REPAIRING NEATLY MQ ROiViPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



'V^ 



¥h 



H 




.A.3vcia:Eaasx, 



TsA:.A^iSS. 



Old gold is the newly adopted color of the Chi- 
cago Uuiveisity. 

The Leland Stanford University at Palo Alto has 
a campus containing sibout 70,000 acres and a 
driveway 17 miles long. 

The largest foot-ball scores on record were made 
by Harvard against Exeter in '86, when she scored 
123-0 ; by Yale against Wesleyan in '86, 136-0 and 
Princeton against Lafayette in '84, 140-0. 

"Yale and Princeton are now the only two col- 
leges which have not been scored against this sea- 
son." Before this could be struck from hundreds 
of college papers, the U. of Penn. badly defeated 
Princeton, for the first time iu eighteen years.. 

One half of the West Point Cadets are obliged to 
wear glasses it is said. This state of affairs is 
largely due to the fact that the barracks are lighted 
by electricity instead of gas. The Board of Visitors 
have asked an appropriation of Congress to remedy 
this. 



NOTICES. 

Mails leave the college for the post-offlee at 1 p. m. and 
7-40 p. M. ou week clays. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Springfield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massar- 
chusetts, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 400, 6-45 p. m. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-45 a. 
M. 4-00, 6 45 p. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 45, 8-30 p. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. m. 

The President will be at his office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sunda3's. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 3 to 5 
p. M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the term. 

The college library will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. Ou Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 

The museum of natural history will be open to 
visitors from 4-30 to 5-30 p. m. Mondays, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays ; from 3 to 4 p. m. Wednesdays, 
and Fridays. Will be closed Saturdays and 
Sundays. 



6o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LAKGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes I Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Slieet JViusic, 



Music Books. 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



.A.ivi:Ea;BK,ST. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F 

AMHERST, MASS. 



.(^ DENTISTS. 9.. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, .iMSEBST,'MJLSS. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PBTSICIANS' PBESCBIPTIOlfS CABEFVLLY 
COMPOUNDED, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your GQM.^ here. 

WILL FIND STUDENT HE.tDQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODGETT & CLARK'S 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



OFFICE HOURS : 
e A.. HS/t. TO 5 E>. T>/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

E. Pv. BENNETT, 
Je^vsreler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PHICES! 

GOOD WORK WAKEAKTTED! 

First Door from Post-offlce. 



Far Suits and Fall DvErcaata 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 

Fli ITAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, .$3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, $2.50 AND $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O, G. COUcH & SOM'S. 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseau, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office op 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cooh's Block, Amherst, Mass. 



n^ 



H 



H 



DEOEL'S DRO& 




Amlierst Hoose Block, 



ilL, 

Aintierst, lass, 






so. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHEEST, MASS. 



DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 P. M. 



^^=-Etlier and Nitrons Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



J^T TUB 



AMHERST^ GASH SHGEx STGRE 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE, 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH EOW, AMHEEST, MASS. 



A. GLY 



T 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

T'ANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges (or Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Eilles. 

Sunday and niglit calls responded to at residence, first door west 
ol Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 



1892. 



THE PHOTO EKSPHER. 



ne:\a/ sky light, 
enlargbd operating room. 

CLASS AND SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTT. 

OE HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



/" 



TAILOR 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleanijig and Pressing a Specialty. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OE AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



]V[ilitapy Suits and Tpimmings. 





A.i:i:il1::i_oj:*^1:« J^^0-«^^* 



'^.. U"^ ^ ci-^^-^-^ie^J 



AGGIE LIFE. 



ilMHERBT, MilSS., NDY. 3D, iBS2. 



"STDL. III. ITd. B, 






AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURy\L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public general!}', that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address. 

Prof. S, T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



THE AlERST 




D 



}m M 



nm 



Li 1 



C. H, S4NDERS01t& CO,, 

CASH DEALERS IN 

FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEIJSOH k THOMPSOf(, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



DRY .AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVERYBODY. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' w.i.nts. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS. STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPE RIES- 
CARPETS. RUGS. ETC.. ETC. 

All Goods STUICTLT CASK and at 
LOWEST PBIGES. 

E- D. MARSH. 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



A FINE LINE OF STODENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

IBTTBSIEIIS O-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



T. W. SLOAN, 
2 I'HosKix no n: 



5. 



i: 



v.ijiv. 






SIEA^A ANi> GAS FSTT^R. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, aiso 

Steam and Hot Water Heatims a Specialty. 



AGGIE 




VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., NOVEMBER 30, 1892. 



No. 6 



AGGIE LIFl 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Oflice as secoud-class mail matter. 

BOAMD OI<^ EDITORS : 

G. W. CUELEY, 'as, Editor-in-Chief, 

J. B. PEERT, '93, Business Manager, 

E. C. HOWARD, '93, F. S. HOTT, '93, 

A. E. MELENDY, '93. C. F. WALKER, '94, 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

T. P. FOLEY, '95. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



tVMtmtT, V V.51^tV,^'i^t^ ?^\\V^1%^. 



rsaEs. 



The college button has now become an establish- 
ed feature in the college. The student, proudly 
wearing it, probably at first little considers what it 
means, — what an amount of good may come of it. 
The idea hidden in the little signet is, that the man 
shall make himself worthy of the button. That is, 
at all times the student shall conduct himself in such 
a manner that no word of disrepute can be thrown 
on the college by the open announcement that he is 
a member. Gieat care is taken by the authorities 
that the uniform shall be worn in no place that, by 
so doing, discredit would be reflected on the col- 
lege. The button should have the same significance. 
While we all feel proud in wearing it we should not 
get the idea that this alone should make the man. Be 
proud of your colors, but never let the maroon and 
white be tarnished in the least by the wearing of 
them. 



Another year has slipped away and another 
Thanksgiving with its happy home gatherings has 



passed us and taken up its march in the rear of the 
long line of Thanksgivings which have gone before 
it. The brief recess, with its cessation of college 
duties, which in October, seemed to us so far away 
and upon which we built so many hopes of rest and 
pleasure, has come and gone and we are back again 
in the steady routine of college life. Some have 
claimed that these holiday recesses, by their break- 
ing up of the regular college work, do the students 
more harm than good. We believe that the change 
of occupation and, for those who spend the time 
away from college, the change of environment is 
both healthful and helpful. The men return to 
their work invigorated in mind and body, ready to 
continue their studies with renewed energy. How- 
ever interested the student may be in his studies the 
continued application and confinement necessary to 
a long term's work wearies both mind and body to 
an extent which will at least make the change bene- 
ficial. The average student looks forward to these 
brief intermissions with pleasant anticipations or 
back to them with pleasant memories and we believe 
it is but rarely the case that the student really loses 
anything by means of them. 



Now that our foot-ball season has come to a close 
and out-door athletics for the time no longer occupy 
our attention, we must bear in mind more strongly 
than ever, the need of physical exercise to the stu- 
dent. The excitement of contest of man with man 
or team with team is lacking to incite us to physi- 
cal exercise, but the gymnasium is opened at all 
times for our use, and it is unfortunate that such 
advantages as are offered us should be neglected as 
they are. To be sure we do not have the facilities 
in this line of physical culture that are offered to 
students in many colleges, but much as we have 
should by no means be neglected as they are. Even 
though a man may not be an athlete, a certain 
amount of athletic work is generally acknowledged 



62 



AGGIE LIFE. 



to be beneficial. Do not let this department suffer 
for every stroke of work done, every hour spent in 
exercise, every particle of real earnest endeavor will 
be a step in the right direction. The athletic asso- 
ciation will hold a series of winter meets on the 
Saturday afternoons of the winter term. Let every 
man take a personal interest in these contests, and 
who knows but that our fond hopes of a field-day 
may, as a result, be realized in the near future. 



We undei stand that it has been proposed by 
some who are well acquainted with the college that 
a year's study of Latin be one of the requirements 
of admission. Undoubtedly the idea in making 
such a change would be to bring here more advanc- 
ed students and give the college a higher rank as an 
educational institution. For many reasons such a 
plau would be beneficial, for every one interested in 
the welfare of the college wishes to see the stand- 
ard gradually raised to the highest point compatible 
with the purpose for which the college was founded 
and is maintained — the education of the sons of 
the farmers of the state. But with this purpose in 
mind we question the advisability of requiring Latin 
at entrance. For the average student entering our 
institution the most difficult study in the freshman 
year aside from Chemistry, is Latin. While he 
may take pleasure in the sciences he finds himself 
compelled to use every effort to grasp the language 
of the ancient Romans. 80 it would seem that the 
number of farmers' sons who could avail themselves 
of the opportunities afforded by the college would 
be greatly reduced and their place would be taken 
by those who come here for a general scientific edu- 
cation with no interest in or inclination for agricul- 
tural pursuits. It would seem preferable to ad- 
vance the standard along other lines than in the 
manner proposed. 



The importance of conducting one's self in a 
gentlemanly manner has probably been instilled into 
every one of us ever since we first sat in a primary 
school. Such being the ease it is strange that 
many forget themselves so far as to act in the man- 
ner they do both in and out of recitation. And 
yet, how indignant we all became when a man from 
Boston said we were too rough here. Any M. A. C. 
student with common sense knows that the behavior 



in some of the recitations is anything but gentle- 
manly. It would not seem so strange if this were 
confined to the Freshman class, as it is expected 
that it will take about a year to weed out the 
"rowdies ;" but as a mt.tter of fact the whole trouble 
lies among the upper classmen, ay far as recitation 
is concerned. Now most of us came here for a 
purpose, and we all know that to obtain the best 
results, strict attention to business is required. 
There is no need of explaining where the most seri- 
ous breaks occurred. That is too well known to 
those to whom this applies. It simply remains for 
the faulty ones to turn a new leaf and act like the 
gentlemen they wish to be termed. We cannot 
blame outsiders for making up stories if there is the 
least cause or nucleus of truth to start on. It is 
very easy to weave out a long story. Well as we 
would like to refute all that has been said about us, 
we cannot do it at present. We are probably no 
rougher than any other college, but we are small. 
There must be a change in the demeanor of some 
individuals in college. We must graduate gentle- 
man and those only. So on this account there 
must be a refinement from the Freshman to the 
alumnus. F'ellows, it remains with us to cause this. 
Will we do it? 



Once more are we in the midst of what is known 
to many as the dull period of the college year. 
The foot-ball season is over, and no longer can the 
student spend his spare moments shivering behind 
the ropes, either to cheer the team to victory or to 
sympathize in tin e of defeat. Election, too, has 
gone by and the college patriot has laid aside torch 
and transparency conscious that he has done his 
best to save the nation, and has reaped a good 
share of enjoyment out of the bargain besides. 
Thanksgiving day has passed away and the student 
has returned from his visit home to pass the few re- 
maining weeks of the term as quickly as he can. 
Well does he realize that in less than four weeks 
the type-written schedule of examinations will again 
be posted on the bulletin-board, and then-vacation ! 
As the Editor sits at his desk he notes an unwonted 
stillness about the college grounds. The leaden sky 
and the chill November winds seem to keep one 
and all indoors to improve the passing moments as 
they may choose. Some are found, day after day, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



63 



poring over unlearned pages of science and pliilos- 
ophy. Otliers reap the reward of their attention to i 
duty in the pnst and S|)end the time in reading, 
wliile others of a less reticent disposition chafe uu- 1 
der the restraint and long for something to relieve 
the monotony. The pond, so dear to every heart, 
is still in the unpenetrated reahiis of the future, and 
the Index is yet a subject of speculation. But never 
mind, time is passing, and soon, very soon, the last 
load of trunks will have gone to the depot ; the drill 
hall li,ghts that have nightly caused the building to 
shine like a iiuge glow-worm in the darkness, will 
fade away ; the December winds will play a mourn- 
ful melody around the eaves and cornices of the 
deserted buildings ; the snow birds will have the 
campus to themselves and no one will disturb them. 
Then, too, will the Editor lock up the sanctum and- 
make his exit. Where has he gone ? Echo alone 
answers, Where? 



OnXTil 



THE NEW YORK CHRYSANTHEMUM 
SHOW. 

Four weeks ago to-day, on Nov. 2d, the doors of 
Madison Square G-arden were opened to exhibit one 
of the choicest collections of chrysanthemums that 
has ever been shown in New York city. 

The fact that associations of men annually expend 
thousands of dollars in premiums on chrysanthe- 
mums for exhibition, has given the culture of this 
favorite flower such an impetus that the more prom- 
inent growers now raise it by the acre. At the 
recent exhibit of the New York Club, plants were 
received from Maine to Virginia, and from the 
states on the Atlantic seaboard to Indiana. 

Fine, large standards, huge specimen plants, and 
the choicest of cut blooms were all tastefully 
arranged and placed in positions for admiration or 
inspection. For standards, many of the choicest 
varieties were so large and tree-like in form that 
manj' thought them to be plants of several years' 
growth. When grown for exhibition purposes, the 
plants are trained into all kinds of forms, sjch as 
trees, cones, pyramids, arches, fans, harps, etc., 
and when the size and color of the blooms harmonize 
with the figure to which the plant has been grown, 
the appearance is most pleasing. 



I remember well, two figures, each plant being 
alike in form and in the variety of its flowers, the 
only difference being that one was white, the other 
yellow. They were the Daisy and The Herald 
varieties, the Daisy being pure white, almost 
exactly like our hardy ox-eye or Michaelmas flower. 
These generally' flowered six or eight on a loose 
spike and as the stems were quite small they could 
readily be trained to frame work. Wires were 
stretched on a frame in the form of a huge palm leaf 
fan. and with a little raflSa fibre, each spike w.as 
tied closely down. Scarcely a leaf or bit of foliage 
on either plant could he seen and these chiysanthe- 
mum fans, standing five feet high were admired by 
thousands. 

One of the finest plants, known as Hicks-Arnold, 
measured seven feet in height and five feet in 
diameter. One of the tallest growing specimen 
plants. Col. H. M. Boies, grown at the United 
States nurseries, measured ten feet. For cut blooms 
probably no variety purely white could surpass the 
Mrs. E. D. Adams. Grown on a single stem to 
the height of from thi'ee to four feet, a huge ball of 
(lure white petals gracefully surmounted the fragile 
stem. The largest flowers often measured six to 
eight inches in diameter, and as they rested so 
gracefully on their small stem, I longed to kick a 
goal and score two for Aggie ; for where is the 
college man whom these six-inch beauties would not 
remind of a foot-ball? 

In the variety of colors, the chrysanthemum is the 
flower for the millions, for everj' tint and shade is 
represented. Not only are they of various colors 
but often new hybrids show two and three colors. 
On one of these new seedlings. No. 23 A, raised 
by Messrs. Pitcher and Manda, the center of the 
corolla was of a pure white, while the lower petals 
were of a lieautiful pink. 

In the Harry May is a delicate mixture of light 
yellow and brown. Another variety is what is com- 
monly called the Mrs. Alpheus Hardy or the "hairy" 
type. In this style of the flower the under side of 
the petal is more or less covered with hair or short 
spines. As the flower is generally of a ball shape, 
the end of the petals present the hairs on what 
would seem to be the upper surface. This style is 
very beautiful and much in demand. These have 
been hybridized to such an extent that hairy varie- 
ties of nearly all colors may now be obtained. 



64 



AGGiE LIFE- 



The Miss Annie Manda is a compactly rounded 
variety, very bairy, which has been much admired 
the past season. In early bloom it is pure white 
but at the flower passes into full bloom, it assumes 
a pinkish appearance. 

Prizes are annually offered on palms, roses, deco- 
rative work, etc., and among such exhibitors Messrs 
Siebreicht and Hadley made a most excellent exhibit 
of palms, his Kentias, Arecas and Cycads being 
especially fine. 

Mr. John N. May, of Summit, N. J., exhibited a 
number of varieties of choice roses. Mr. I. Condon, 
a Brooklyn floiist, was pleased to show a centur}' 
plant in bloom. Messrs. J. H. Small and Sons 
made a miniature white house of white immortelles ; 
the building as well as the small lamps being lighted 
with electricity. Drives were laid out through the 
grounds, which were green with selaginella, dark 
green forming the background, while a lighter shade 
was used for border work, A variegated variety 
-was made up into figures for flower beds, in which 
were small pandanos, cocos, dracenas and variegated 
aspedistras. This piece of floricultural work was 
spoken of by many as being the grandest they had 
ever seen. Certain it was that the reproduction was 
perfect. 

In the center of the garden a huge fountain and 
basin had been erected and here ferns and aquatic 
plants seemed to thrive in all their native beauty. 

Another feature which contributed to make the 
exhibition a success and to keep the great crowds in 
good humor was tlie excellent music furnished by 
the band. Each afternoon and evening a dozea 
selections were rendered and heartily enjoyed, as 
only music by a band can be, in Madison Square 
Garden. 

F. H. Plumb, '92. 



First came tbe spotless full dress suit, 
Then four-in-hand, by chance. 
Soon "galluses" were quite the rage. 
And will it next be-?? ! !— 

— Univ. Cynic. 



The meloncholic days are gone, 
The days of russet shoes. 

No more the sun will do the "shine" 
Nor bootblacks have the blues. 



WINTER. 

The year is drawing to its close, 

The winter cometh nigh, 
And eke before its chilling breeze 

Both birds and leaves must fly. 

Soon o'er the earth the whitening sheet, 

God's crystal gift to man, 
Will cover with a mantle ijright 

The surface of the land. 

The summer's pastimes must give way 

To tliose for winter meet. 
The glist'ning ice show darting gleams 

Of smooth and steel-shod feet. 

The moonlit air will oft resound 
With sounds both weird and gay ; 

The creaking of the Frost King's step. 
The bells on dashing sleigh. 

The evenings grow both dark and long, 

The while within must burn 
The shaded lamp. The student near 

The morrow's task must leam. 

But study is not all of life, 

And oft with merry call, 
He livens up the winter days 

With whiz of passing ball. 

Perchance for change a storm will come 

Of driving snow and sleet. 
T'will fill the air with dark'ning whirl, 

Make liome a glad retreat. 

But storms will always pass away 

And breaking clouds grow bright. 
To make the contrast greater seem 
' Between the dark and light. 

And so the winters come and go 

With joy and sorrow rife, 
Enriching with their rugged wealth 

The passing years of life. 



E. M. 



— Hesperus. 



ATHLETIC TRAINING. 

Is the benefit derived from athletic sports, in the 
development and education of the senses sufficient 
to compensate college men for the expenditure of 
time and money ' 

No one will deny that in order to be a successful 
combatant in the battle of life, the whole man is 
required. There is no profession, no occupation, 
no calling, no position in life in which a fairly 
developed frame will not be valuable to him and 



AGGIE LIFE. 



65 



essential to his success. Id tlie consideration of 
this topic, we have to deal with two equally impor- 
tant organisms : — the mind and the body, touching 
more especially upon the latter as being educated 
through the senses. 

The mind acts through a material organism, the 
brain, upon which it is dependent, and which like 
other organs is subject to constant renewal from the 
same vital fluid. But in common with other organs, 
also, if the activity of the brain is carried on beyond 
certain limits its waste exceeds nutrition and its 
strength gives place to weakness. The mind, then, 
is dependent upon the blood for its material support, 
and its healthy action is dependent on its receiving 
an adequate supply of pure healthy blood. More- 
over the organ of the mind being subject to the 
same laws as the other organs, requires similar 
alternations of rest and action to maintain it in its 
natural state of efficiency. Therefore, in order that 
the brain may perform its functions properly, we 
find that it is necessary to provide it with its proper 
amount of blood and rest. 

In the ease of college men where the brain is used 
to a large extent without the proper amount of bod- 
ily exercise, it is requisite that we should balance 
this inequality by athletics. I say athletics because 
this is about the only field open to college men by 
which they can obtain the required amount of phys 
ical exercise. 

It is an indisputable fact that athletics increase 
the size and power of the voluntary muscles em- 
ployed. They promote the health and strength of 
the whole body by increasing respiration and quick- 
ening circulation, which means that the brain has 
an increased supply of blood, or brtun food, upon 
which it may draw at any time. Thev also give a 
certain amount of rest to the brain by drawing the 
blood away from it and by producing a radical 
change of environments. 

But do athletics develop our senses ? 

They most certainly do, and they go farther — 
they train the senses to become the more obedient 
servants of the will. A man in the rush-line may bo 
severely worried by his opponent, yet when the sign 
is about to be given for him to take the ball he 
knows nothing of the mechanical process he is going 
through to keep his man back, but his whole atten- 
tion is given to hearing the sign and watching the 
ball so as to be on hand when it is snapped back. 



The coaching in this game and in base-ball requires 
men not simply to watch the game closely but to 
watch for the signs and commands. Polo requires 
men who are unusually quick-sighted — a man, who, 
when an opponent is rushing down on him can lift 
the ball over the opponent's head, rush by and as it 
comes down on the other side can catch it on his 
stick and carry it towards the goal. 

In a scientific boxing match several blows will be 
exchanged and parried almost before the eye of the 
spectator can perceive them. In all these sports 
the senses are educated more efficiently by practice. 

Do athletics in the education of the senses pay for 
the expenditure of time and money ? 

An athlete does not necessarily pay out any more 
money than the average student unless his enthusi- 
asm leads him to give large voluntary contributions. 
What an athlete gives most is his time. But this 
time is not wasted : while his class-men are walk- 
ing for their health he is getting his exercise, which 
is necessary to every student, and mental rest in the 
field. He can, as a rule, get his lessons (which are 
only mental tasks) in much less time than they can 
and this, too, in a room where there is plenty of 
disturbance. 

What is the difference? One is getting mental 
development and but little physical while the other 
is getting a superior mind with its senses or servants 
ready to act upon the instant and an able body to 
cooperate with and sustain it. 

We learn by psychology that we must apprehend 
objects by the senses before we can think them. Is 
it not profitable then to us who as college men are 
so soon to use our senses in business life, to educate 
and develop them as much as possible while we are 
in college by a judicious expenditure of our time in 
athletics? Every athlete and unbiased person will 
answer this as I would, in the affirmative. 

C. A.S. 



The members of the Ann Arbor foot-ball team 
are forbidden in practice games to converse with 
one another, as it is considered detrimental to good 
playing. 



Cornell is mentioned as a possible successor to 
Wesleyan in the Intercollegiate Foot-Ball League. 
The latter team is altogether too weak for the other 
elevens. 



66 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— Where is the flag? 

— The cannon are once more under cover. 

— 'Winter vacation this year will be but ten days. 

— Repairs are being made in the chemical labora- 
tory. 

— A. E. Melendy, '93, spent the recess in Deer- 
field. 

— Ballon, '95, has been at home the past two 
weeks. 

— The band played at t'le Democratii; celebration, 
Nov. 17. 

— There are now over 13,000 volumes in the col- 
lege library. 

— Recitations due for last Monday, will beheld 
next Saturday. 

— President Goodell returned from his southern 
trip last Monday. 

— The band-stand has been touched up with a 
new coat of paint. 

— Molasses candy was in ord«r during the 
Thanksgiving recess. 

— Mr. Charles Bray of Clinton visited E. J. 
Walker, '93, last week. 

— Association football is the recreation on the 
campus since the Rngby season closed. 

—An unusually large number of the students re- 
mained during the Thanksgiving recess. 

— The orchestra furnished music for an annual 
ball at Belchertovvn Thanksgiving night. 

— A recent issue of the Amherst Student con- 
tained a picture of the champion football team. 

— A large number of M. A. C. students attended 
the Yale-Harvard game at Springfield the 19th inst. 

— During the long winter evenings the gymnasium 
promises to be an attraction to many of the stu- 
dents. 

— The battalion is now having company drill. 
This will probably be the principal order for the 
winter. 

— Mr. Fred D. Gorham, ex-'92, of Westport, 
Ct., accompanied by his sister visited the college 
last Saturday. 



— The screening, rope.s, etc. are beginning to be 
taken from the tennis courts. This looks as though 
the game was out of date. 

— The college buttons are here at last. Students 
who have not already provided themselves with 
them should do so at once. 

— The final examinations of the Junior class in 
horticulture scheduled for last Wednesday was post- 
poned until after the recess. 

— Quite extensive additions are soon to be made 
to the chemical apparatus of our laboratory. Quar- 
antine laws are such that there has been a serious 
delay. 

— Junior zoology notes were due Tuesday, the 
29th inst. The lalioratory ha.s been closed and the 
remainder of the term will be spent in class room 
work. 

— Nov. 18, the strong wind that passed over 
College Hill Completely unroofed Appletou Cabinet 
at Amherst College. The damage was quite ex- 
tensive. 

— There was a royal good banquet at the College 
Boarding house Thanksgiving day. About thirty 
students who did not go home to spend the day did 
justice to the meal. 

— The Christmas vacation will begin Friday, Dec. 
23 at 10.30 A. M. and extend to Jan. 3rd. This is 
considei-ably shorter than we have been accustomed 
to have in the past. 

— The football team disbanded immediately after 
the game with Harvard, '96. The following officers 
have been elected for the season of 1893 : captain, 
J. E. Gifford ; manager, R. E. Smith. 

— The class in dancing will begin immediately 
after the Christmas vacation. A large number have 
signified their intention to avail themselves of the 
op|/ortunity to receive Mr. Petit's instruction. 

— A comment was made in last issue regaiding 
cold recitation rooms. Jn justice to those who have 
charge of the fires, it should be stated that the fault 
did not lie with them. There is now no cause for 
com()laint. 

— Six copies of those rare reports on the horse, 
issued by the U. S. Department of Animal Industry, 
were distributed to members of the Senior class by 
lot. It is unfortunate that all those who desire one 
cannot be supplied. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



67 



— On the eveniug of Nov. 17, after no small 
amount of trouble, the cannon picked themselves 
up and went down to the Democratic celebration 
where they were called upon to speak on the wis- 
dom of the election. 

—The Glee Club is having three rehearsals every 
week, regularly, and, no doubt, will prove a suc- 
cess. Last commencement this was one of the 
most attractive features of I he exercises, and the 
college looks forward to an equally good, if not 
better showing this coming year. 

— A large force of wurkmeu have been employed 
on the dam during the past week and every endea- 
vor is being made to complete the structure before 
cold weather shall put a stop to all operations. 
Work has been offered to all students who wish to 
take advantage of llie opportunity at the rate of 
$1..50 for each day of nine hours. 

— The last meeting of the W. I. Literary Society 
was characterized by much of its old time interest. 
The subject for discussion was : "Resolved that the 
Republican platform offered more inducements to 
voters than did the Democratic platform." The 
weight of argument and the merits of the question 
were both decided in the afBrmative. 

— Some of the most important football scores for 
the last two weeks have beeu .as follows : — Friday, 
Nov. 18, Amherst vs Williams at Williamstown, 
60-0. Saturday, Nov. 19, Yale vs Harvard at 
Springfield, 6-0. Thursday, Nov. 24, Yale vs 
Princeton at New York, 12-0. University of Penn. 
vs Wesleyan at Philadelphia, 34-0. 

— The first entertainment in the Union Lecture 
Course occurs Nov. 30, when Prof. R. G. Hibberd 
of Wesleyan will give readings. Those who heard 
Prof. Hibberd last year will not fail to take advan- 
tage of the opportunity to hear him again. The 
Henschel Quartette of Springfield will give a con- 
cert in the same course, Dec. 4. Prices as usual. 

— Now that the gymnasium is being used so much 
would it not be well for the Athletic Association to 
occasionally inspect and test such apparatus as is 
liable to cause serious accidents to those practicing. 
The prospect of having one's head come in con- 
tact with the cement floor rnight deter the timid 
from using some of the apparatus unless they knew 
it was perfectly safe. 



—Saturday evening, Nov. 19, the third lecture 
of the Amherst College Course was held at College 
Hall. Thomas Nelson Page was the speaker of the 
evening and those who heard his touching readings 
in the negro dialect carried away impressions not to 
be forgotten for some time to come. Last Saturday 
evening the fourth entertainment of the course, a 
concert, was given by the Tavary-Del Puente Grand 
Concert Company. The name of the company 
speaks for itself. 

— The tennis tournament this fall was by far the 
most successful one ever held at the college. The 
entries for both singles and doubles were numerous 
and the style of play showed that the men had both 
practice and ability. In spite of the increased in- 
terest taken in foot-ball this season the men were 
usually prompt and very few games were won by 
default. The winners of the prizes offered by the 
association were : Singles, A. B. Smith ; doubles, 
E. C. and S. F. Howard. 



DEVELOPMENT OF FOOT-BALL. 

Notwithstuuding the efforts of humorous newspa- 
per editors to crv down foot-ball, and the arguments 
of men who know little about the game, the body of 
college students recognize that, as a progressive 
and scientific game, foot-ball is unequaled. During 
the last three or four years the game has l)een devel- 
oping in science and popularity with surprising 
rapiility. The manner of playing the game to-day 
is materially different from the way in which it was 
pi.ayed a few years ago. 

While these changes have been taking place in 
the foot-ball world, Aggie has beeu doing her part 
by placing in the field year after year teams which 
have worked faithfully and effectually to excel their 
predecessors, and to bring our college into promi- 
nence. In the season of '89 the faculty disapproved 
of the game, and it vras under serious disadvan- 
tages, and with considerable opposition among the 
students that a team was organized at all. At this 
period the sole object of the players was to be able 
to defeat Williston, then our greatest rival in sports. 
The two games against Williston were the only ones 
played during the season, and in both our team was 
victorious. 

The following year considerable new material 
developed, and a comparatively strong team was 



68 



AGGIE LIFE. 



organized. Tlie practice became more systematic, 
but at that time mucli less attention was paid to 
team work than at present, and tlie plays consisted 
mainly of brilliant individual work. The flatiron V 
or "turtle crawl" as it is sometimes called was an 
important innovation this year, and in the effective 
use of this play especially our team excelled. Dur- 
ing this season we were defeated by Trinity, Am- 
herst, University of Vermont and by Stagg's team, 
although later in the season the latter team was 
badly defeated by us at Springfield. 

The season of '91 opened with little prospect of a 

strong team, but to the surprise and gratiiication of 

all, under the able leadership of Capt. Willard the 

team proved itself a decided success. During this 

season more dependence was placed upon skill and 

team work thun upon erratic and unsteady plays. 

Following is a list of the games played : 

Aggie us. Trinity, 0-16 

" " Amherst, 0-44 

" " Stagg's Team, 0-30 

" " Worcester Polytechnic. 36-10 

" " Am hirst, 0-16 

" " Amherst, 4 20 

" " Holy Cross, 16-6 

The present season was looked forward to with 

bright hopes. The financial support of the team 

was equaled only by the interest and cooperation of 

the players in their work. The hearty support of 

the team gives the best of evidence that the college 

as a whole take a deep interest in the game. The 

ability of Capt. Perry is best shown by the steady 

work of the players as well as by the improved 

methods of team work introduced. Much credit is 

due Dr. Seerley of Springfield for his excellent work 

during the short time that he coached the team. 

The games and scores were as follows : 

Aggie vs. Trinity, 0-6 

" " Worcester Polytechnic, 28-10 

" " Amherst, 10-58 

" ■' Mt. Hermon, 16-10 

" " Amherst, 0-4 

" " Worcester Polytechnic, 18-4 

" " Williston, 22-12 

" " Amherst, 4-22 

" " Boston University, 62-0 

" " Springfield Training School, 16-18 

" " Mt. Hermon, 12-12 



" " Harvard '96, 12-46 

There is excellent material for next season's team 
and it is expected that under the energetic leader- 
ship of the captain and manger already elected we 
may see Aggie take a still higher rank among the 
colleges of New England. 

F. H. H. 



THE VALUE OF A WINTER COURSE IN 
AGRICULTURE. 

It is becoming a sort of custom among many of 
our agricultural colleges to furnish a special course 
in agriculture during the winter months, for the ben- 
efit of those farmers' sous who can not afford to 
leave the farm at any other time of the year. This 
is a movement in the right directii^n. The young 
farmers are beginning to see the great value of such 
a course of study and are embracing the opportuni- 
ties offered. There is much to be said in favor of 
this practice which is fast becoming a custom. In 
many cases where the farmer is in somewhat limited 
circumstances and must depend on his son for help, 
it looks reasonable that three or, at the most, four 
months in the winter is the onl}' time of the year 
that the latter can be spared from home. 

If this is the only chance a young man has for 
getting an education, by all means let it be well 
improved. A large proportion of the farmers' sons 
are expecting to choose agriculture as their vocation. 
Here is a golden opportunity. Three months spent 
in faithful work at an agricultural college is not to 
be overlooked or underestimated. 

About two months ago the writer was called upon 
to :inswer the following questions : "Where can I 
send my son to study for three or four months this 
winter? I live on a farm and my boy is expecting 
to become a farmer. I cannot spare him for more 
than four months and I desire, if possible, that this 
time shall be spent in studying something that will 
be an aid to him in his chosen work. Would you 
advise me to send him to the Mass. Agr'l College?" 

The questioner seemed rather surprised on receiv- 
ing a negative reply to the latter question, but who 
would have answered otherwise? If a young man 
can spend only one winter in school, he does not 
want to take the examinations for a four years 
course at an agricultural college and then drop out 
after a term's study. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



69 



Special winter courses in agriculture are what we 
need. Undoubtedly if such were offered here our 
institution would become much more widely known 
than it is at present aud the number of students 
increased far beyond the capacity of our buildings. 
No doubt that those who have the power to estab- 
lish such a course here, have not as yet seen fit to 
do so for very good reasons. 

The Pennsylvania Agricultural College offers for 
the coming winter three separate courses in the 
agricultural line, — -one in General Agriculture, one 
in Horticulture, and one in Dairying. These con- 
sist mostly of lectures by able men of the faculty. 
Cornell and other colleges ; re following suit, and it 
is to be hoped that before many years, a winter 
coarse in agriculture or some closely related science 
will be one of the attractive features of every agri- 
cultural college. 

G. H. M. 



lumni 



'72. — Prof. John W. Clark has erected a new 
greenhouse at his home, North Hadley. 

'79. — Samuel B. Green, St. Anthony Park, Minn. 
Professor of Horticulture at University of Minne- 
sota, has an article on the preservation of trees 
in the last number of The Lumberman. 

'72. — Prof. Samuel T. Maynard spent Thanks- 
giving at Marlborough. 

'90. — D. W. Dickinson, at present attending the 
Boston Dental College, spent Thanksgiving here in 
town. 

'92. — G. E. Taylor and W. I. Boynton visited 
here last week. 



The Chicago University will have charge of the 
place for the reception and convention of college 
men which will be reserved on the World's Fair 
grounds. 



Centerbus rushibus, 
No gainorum. 

Kickibus nosibus, 
Blood allorum. 



THE SHEPHERD. 

Wheu from her Eastern chamber comes the sun, 

And all the sky with crimson is ablaze, 
While o'er the earth the eager light does run, 
And morning dew-drops sparkle in the rays. 
He leads his flock, with crook in hand, 
Down to their pleasant pasture land. 

Oft times, half covered by the fragrant grass, 

'Mid buttercups aud daisies bright he'll lie 
And watch the fleecy clouds while on they pass 
As ships before the wind go sailing by. 

Now like a field of softest snow they seem. 
Or storied castle of some Fairie dream. 

He knows each season's flower, and every bird 

Is a dear friend to him ; their softest note 
Charms his quick ear as round him, undisturbed. 
Through the clear air on joyful wings they float, 
Or, perched upon some neighboring tree, 
Pour forth exquisite melody. 

How happy Nature's friends ! To them she shows 

A thousand beauties hid to common eyes, 
A sheltered dell, where Spring's first flower grows, 
A hidden wood, where sweetest songs arise. 

To those who seek her all her charms are known. 
For Nature must be wooed if she be won. 

— Tale Lit. 



Schillare's 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIN STREET, 



NOMTBAMPTOK, MASS. 



70 



AGGIE LIFE. 



INTERCOLLEGIA TE. 

Boston collei^e rolls show 359 students. 

Yale has students from 15 foreign countries. 

Princeton's library subscribes to 180 periodicals. 

There are 190 college papers in the United States. 

At Cornell 512 students receive free tuition each 
year. 

Yale College has had 12 presidents since its foun- 
dation in 1701 . 

Cross country runs are held twice a week regu- 
larly at Harvard. 

Wesleyan will arrange a biological exhibit at the 
Columbian exhibition. 

There are more than 500 co-eds in all departments 
of the Univ. ot Michigan. 

The Harvard Crimson is twenty-six years old, 
and the Yale News fifteen. 

In the last seven years Yale has scored 886 
points to her opponents 88. 

Chicago University has now" 665 students accord- 
ing to the University News. 

Osgood the Cornell half-back will enter next year 
the University of Pennsylvania. 

Twenty-one graduates of Middleboro College 
have become college presidents. 

Five thousand college men participated in the 
New York Columbian celebration. 

There are twenty-five men in Brown University 
taking outside business in the city. 

Williams, Columbia and Dartmouth have dis- 
pensed with commencement exercises. 

Wellesley will hereafter have a .Senior Day in 
place of the class day of other colleges. 

Wm. Astor has promised a million dollars to 
found a negro university in Oklahoma. 

According to Vassar Miscellany about 40 per cent, 
of the college alumni manage to marry. 

The last three Justices of the Supreme Court 
apijointed by Pres. Harrison are Yale men. 

The University of Chicago publish a quarterly 
calendar in the interests of university extension. 

Harvard was the first of the American colleges 
to open a graduate school. The first degree of 
doctor was given in 1873. 



The Harvard-Yale boat race of '93 may take 
place at Chicago as one of the world's fail features. 

The first college paper in the United States 
came into existence at Dartmouth with Daniel 
Webster as editor-uieliit-f. 



nr;_j*rfih3^i"gleiP 




FOR SALE BY 



No. 3 S-.nith College, 

BOX 386, AMHEIRST, MASS. 
All correspoudence will receive prompt attention. 



INSTRUCTOR IN 



Is now forming a class in dancing for M. A. C. men. Tliere wiU "be 
an advanced division fur tliose who can dance already, in wliich the 
latest dances will be taught. For terms inquire at my Hall. 

.^jf-Members of my former classes as well as the present ones 
can obtain admission cards totheKeceptions by applying at the Hall. 

Residence ano Hall, Dickinson's Block. 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 



NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 

ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 

GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 

FIJtSX CLASS GOODS. FRICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH COUUEIGE. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

Steal 

and Carpet Reiiovatiii Eslaislimeiit, 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 






Get Sample Rates for AA^ashing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

r^J^ s-A.Tisi'A-CTioisr ca-xjA.KA-isrTEBXJ.a'S^' 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



71 



Tea this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 

Beail5irte[§ for stignfs Supplies. 

" Lamps and Lamp Coods aieOiirs." 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHEBST, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED i SALE STABLE, 

T, L. PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMBEBST, MASS. 



J. A. RAWSOM, 



DEALER IN 



WflTGHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

FINE BTiLTIDNERY. 

REPAIRING NEATLY A^JO ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



'V 



. P^ 



-\ 



ill, 




.A^I^/IHCEIISX, 



Is/LA-SSS. 



Coinell is the Mecca of college fraternities, 
thirty-three Greek letter societies have chapters 
there. 

Harry A.. Garfield, oldest son of Pres. Garfield, 
has received an appoinlment as professor at Cleve- 
land, O. 

Dartoaouth has organized a press club, the charter 
members consisting of the editors of the various 
college papers. 

It is announced that the class of '82, Princeton, 
will erect as its memorial an arched gateway to the 
college campus. ' 

Philadelphia is to make an effort to get its college 
students to discontmue the practice of giving col- 
lege yells on the street. 

The class of '96 at the U. of P. has organized a 
house of representatives, which will be governed 
according to congressional rules. 



NOTICES. 

Mails leave the college for the post-office at 1 p. m. and 
7-40 p. M. on week days. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Springfield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 p. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massa^ 
chusetts, 7-45, 10-45, A. M. 4-00, 6-45 p. M. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-45 a. 
M. 4-00, 6-45 P. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 45, 8-30 p. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. m. 

The President will be at his office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 3 to 5 
p. M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the term. 

The college library will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m. and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 

The museum of natural history will be open to 
visitors from 4-30 to 5-30 p. m. Mondays, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays ; from 3 to 4 p. m. Wednesdays, 
and Fridays. Will be closed Saturdays and 
Sundays. 



72 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes! Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Slieet Music, 



Miasic Books, 



Strings 

FOR the: violin, banjo, guitar, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 



..^DENTISTS. 5).. 

C. S. GATES, D. U. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CUTLUM'S BLOCK, AMHMRST, MASS. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONEECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



FBTSICIAJfS' PRESCBIPTIONS CAJRMFVI.I,T 
COMPO VNDED, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCEXLS EOW. 

Order your 0OA£ here. 



WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODGETT k CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



Far Buits and Fall Dvercoats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
9 A.. IvI. TO 5 E>. 1>^L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

PINE GOODS! I.OW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



FINE ITAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $3.00. VERT HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O. G. COUcH & SON'S. 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Parisbau, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Offlce, Cooh's Block, Amherst^ Mass, 






[\ll 



H 



FRBBH RWn FINS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG S 



Amherst House Block, 



ORE, 

Amtierst, lass. 



HENRY A.D^M8, 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

EANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPOBTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 



1892. 



THE PHDTDG-RJLPHS] 



NEW SKY LIGHT. 
EINLARGEID OPERATING ROOM. 



CLASS AND SOCIETY OROUPS A SPECIALTY, 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



^. g. DI(5Hl()fgC)i^, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 
WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



^^Ether and Nitrons Oxide Gas administered wiien 
desired. 



A-T 'THE 



AMHEiRST GASH SHGEi STQREi 

Tou can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 

A. GLYNN, 



/" 



TAILOR 



A 



./ 



Repairing Neatly Done. 



Cleanijtg and Pressing a Specialty: 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



pilitapy Suits and Twtnmings. 



assachusetts Aaricuitural Coileae, 




C^ . fl <JAa.a^ Co^t^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



iLMHERST, MASS., HEC. 14, 1BS2. 



YDL. III. Nq. 7. 



rperiTfT 



orf hous^, 



*RR!NTEiRS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRlCULTURj\L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We ■would inform the friends of tlie college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



m AMHERST 




>ND CAR 



D 



m 



C. H. SANDERS01(& CO,, 

CASH DEALERS IN 

FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEp^i k TH0MPS0H_, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVKRTBODY. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTR^jSES, P ILLOWS . STUDY 
DESKS AN D _ CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS. RUGS. ETC., ETC. 



All Goods STILICTLir CASH and at 



E. D. MA.I^SH, 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHEKST, MASS. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



R,E:PA.IR.IISrca- I30ISTB I»R.01.^FTX."5£-. 



T, W. SLOAN, 

» I'HOiSix Htnr. 



5. A. PHILLIPS, 

Rraetkal Plamber, 



STEAM, mB G/\S FSTTER^ 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heatins a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., DECEMBER 14, 1892. 



No. 7 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOASD OF EDITORS: 

G. F. CURLKT, '93, Editor-in-Chief, 

J. E. PEERY, '93, Business Manager, 

E. C. HOWARD, '93, F. S. HOTT, '93, 

A. E. MELENDT, '93. C. F. WALKER, '94, 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

T. P. FOLEY, '95. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



tV^^tU'^t^ V V.(l*t*ftMSt^ ^»\\V\t7\S. 



rials. 



Some time ago a petition signed by nearlj every 
man in college was handed to tlie faculty requesting 
that steps be taken to have the unusually short va- 
cation scheduled in the catalogue lengthened, thus 
allowing the students more than ten days stay at 
home. As it is understood that the shortness of the 
proposed vacation is due to an oversight in making 
up the calendar, all have been looking forward to 
a favorable answer. Considerable time has already 
passed and as yet no answer has been received. It 
would greatly convenience the students, especially 
those who are expecting to spend the time in work, 
if an answer could be given very soon. 



In justice to the students as a whole who were by 
no means in sympathy with the perpetrators, we 
wish to strongly condemn the act of the few men, who 
contrary to the known wishes of those in authority, 
cut down the tree which stood" within the site of the 
new pond. The matter of making way with the tree 
has been discussed by both faculty and students and 



the conclusion has been reached that it would not 
be sufficiently in the way to warrant destroying such 
a fine specimen of the species. Such being the sit- 
uation the students could not ask to have it removed 
and the men who did the deed, did it entirely from 
a spirit of lawlessness and not because it was de- 
sired by the students. Such occurrences cannot 
help reflecting on the students and those guilty of 
such acts are not worthy of the privileges which 
they, as students of this institution, possess. 



When is the Index coming out? At last after 
many weary months of anxiety and toil, the Board 
itself has answered this oft repeated question, there- 
by satisfying the curiosity of the inquisitive. The 
Index, we are told, is coming out, and what is more 
it is to appear on time. In another column we print 
an announcement that cannot fail to hold the atten- 
tion of every one. Onr annual is becoming more 
and more to be considered as a college publication 
the highest object of which is to further the inter- 
ests of the college above every thing else. If the 
Ninety-four Index editors have succeeded in this re- 
spect, as we believe they have, their labors have 
not been in vain ; it only remains for the college to 
give them the support that they deserve. Let every 
one bear this in mind when the books are puton sale. 



Ode library is a credit to our institution and the 
students are much facilitated in their studies in all 
branches by the well selected and large variety of 
books in all departments. It is important that these 
books be preserved in the best possible condition. 
Of course a book in constant use is subjected to a 
great deal of wear and this in time will show in the 
appearance of the book. This wear is unavoidable. 
But there can be no excuse for marking or in any 
way defacing a book in the manner in which some 
of the books in the library appear to have been. It 
would be well if the state law regarding the misuse 



74 



AGGIE LIFE. 



of library books could be enforced in every instance 
where the crime is committed. But where the books 
are for our own advantage there should be no need 
of such a law. No man should mark a book either 
for his own convenience or for any other reason. 
The books are public property and should always be 
used as such. 



Is there to be a series of class polo contests this 
coming winter? This is a question which is often 
asked and especiailj' as the lake is now a reality_ 
It seems as if there might be interest among the 
members of the different classes to warrant such 
games. True, there has been no opportunity to 
learn what material Ninety-six would have for a 
team but considering the size of the class it is 
probable that it can furnish a creditable one. 
The other classes are able to support excellent 
teams, as has been proved in the past, and it is a 
question as to which of the four classes would win 
the championship. We are aware that the Athletic 
Association is to offer extra iuducemeuts in the line 
of indoor ''gym" work during the coming term and 
we would not wish to detract anything from the 
work of that association. However, we now have 
a lake of suitable size for polo interests we see no 
reason why this plan is not feasible. This is but a 
branch of athletics, so let us do all we are able to 
support it and strive in this manner to arouse the 
students from the general disinterestedness which 
pervades all athletics here except foot-ball and 
base-ball. 



During last winter the subject of a musicale was 
brought up for discussion by some of the students, 
and was brieily 'considered in one issue of Aggie 
Life, and though the proposition seemed to meet 
with general favor, the plan dropped out of sight 
almost as quickly as it had put in its appearance. 
But why can we not have an entertainment of this 
kind the coming winter? The opportunities offered 
the Aggie students for coming together in a body 
socially, are few enough, and to us it seems that a 
musical entertainment would be just what would 
accomplish this end. It might be a joint concert of 
the Glee club and orchestra, with solos, readings or 
some such variety of entertainment as would break 
the monotony of an entire musical program. The 



plan proposed is not to have it a purely money mak- 
ing entertainment, but to have admission free to M. 
A. C. students, and charging merely a nominal ad- 
mittance fee to townspeople, merely to pay the 
ru)ining expenses and if there is any excess after 
all expenses have been met, to turn such money 
over to one of the various associations of the col- 
lege. If the right men take hold of this affair, 
there is no reason why we should not hold a musi- 
cale that will be a credit both to ourselves and to 
the town. 



In the report of Prof. Brooks' address at Spencer 
we notice that mention was made of the proposed 
plan of having two courses here, one of four years 
as now and one of two years for those who are not 
inclined or who are unable to take the full course. 
If a two year course be established it would neces- 
sarily comprise only Agriculture and Horticulture 
together with the more elementary sciences and 
what chemistry could be acquired in so short a 
time. The languages and most of the "ologies" 
could not probably be taken up at all. While such 
a course would of necessity be much narrower in its 
scope than the four ye ar's course it would enable a 
great many who cannot afford either the time or the 
money for the full course to take advantage of that 
part of the college curriculum which bears most 
directly upon agriculture. In event of such a 
change the four year's course would probably remain 
practically as it is or, better, be enlarged and broad- 
ened by electives along various lines both old and 
new as for instance an elective course in German. 
While no definite action has as yet been taken in re- 
gard to any of these proposed changes, they are so 
obviously for the best interests and advancement of 
the college that we cannot forbear mentioning 
them and we feel sure that the matter will be pushed 
as rapidly as circumstances will permit. 



AN UNKIND CUT. 

Ye Senior hath a chapel cut, 

He hidetli in his lair ; 
Ye Junior hath a razor cut 

And much dislievelled hair ; 
Ye Sopliie in liis cutaway 

Doth on the campus prance ; 
But ye Freshie hath the shortest cut 

On the bottom of his pants. 

— Univ. Cynic. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



75 



f on-tTributed. 



THANKSGIVING MEMORIES. 

The ocean cooled gusts of a November day blew 
merrily across Bristol town from the Narragansett. 
On one hand the distant spires of Fall River beyond 
the blue chilly waters of the Taunton ; on the other 
the equally blue bay above Newport and in front 
the low mound of Mt. Hope the former home of the 
kind Massasoit, the cruel King Phillip and the 
crafty Queen Weetomoe of Indian fame. Such was 
the scene which the robust and merry driver of a 
party of four gentlemen, which included the writer, 
saw on last Thanksgiving day as they passed from 
Warren, R. I. to Bristol. 

"Ge' dap old boss" to the white nag rather in- 
clined to give the passengers a lengthy view of the 
scenery. "G'long, there aiut nothing fast about ye, 
is there — not even yer hair" quoth John as a collec- 
tion of white horse hairs were blown by his face. 

"That's the old DeWolf house over there, don't 
you see it? It's one of the oldest houses and they 
say it is haunted"said Mr. Hezekiah Butterworth of 
the "Zigzag Journey's" fame. The party consisted 
of the English artist Arthur Pope, Mr. Butterworth 
and the writer. They had just dined on the old 
Butterworth ancestral lands in Warren and were out 
seeing the country, making a collection of white 
horse hairs and trying to keep warm. Mr. Butter- 
worth is well known as an editor of the Youth' s 
Companion and his store of Indian and old New 
England legends is boundless. He continued : — 

"The original owner used to be a slave trader and 
it was said during the latter part of his life that 
whenever he sat down to dine and looked in his 
plate he would see it bleeding this being caused by 
the haunting ghosts of the many poor slaves he had 
ruthlessly murdered." 

"See, there is one of those fine old orchards don't 
you see it?" again -Volunteered Mr. Butterworth as 
the carriage slowly passed a farm. "There's 500 
trees there, fine old trunks too, and their owner 
lives in Boston, an old bachelor, and pays three 
cents apiece for apples." 

One of the party, whose scent must have been 
very keen, exclaimed "they must get some cider 
around here. Any cider mills near? " 



"Well," laughed Mr. Butterworth, "there used to 
be a great many barrels of cider made from these 
orchards ; perhaps there are some mills now but 
there were some big ones years ago. Some queer 
things happtned in those old days," with a retro- 
spective look on his face which promised a story. 

"I recall an incident said to have occurred in a 
church near here. It was almost a crime in those 
days not to attend church and even to be late was 
--well — wiisn't as fashionable as it is now. 

In the village lived a man on a small place not 
affording orchard privileges. Oue Sunday being 
sick he sent his boy over before church to a neigh- 
boring farm, where a friend of his lived. The er- 
rand was some trivial affair. The friend of course 
learned of the father's sickness and said 'I want you 
to take my best wishes to your father, and here is 
something which will be good for him.' At the 
same time he handed out a couple of bottles of cider, 
which the boy placed carefully one in each pocket. 
He then left and not having intended going home 
before church found he had not time and as it would 
not do to stay away or be late he went to church.'' 

Here Mr. Butterworth hesitated, smiling for an 
instant and then went on "You know the sermons 
used to be two hours long sometimes. On this 
occasion the church was warm, the boy sleepy and 
the sermon interminable, almost. The prayer had 
just begun when a queer commotion in one of the 
boy's pockets startled him into instant wakefulness. 

There was a pop, a fizz, and the stopper of one 
of the bottles started skyward like a comet with a 
tail of frothy apple juice following. The warm room 
had caused the cider to work until a spirited action 
was the result. 

The boy almost flew toward the pew door rieht in 
the midst of the prayer. He thought of the other 
bottle in the other pocket. But just as he reached 
the aisle 'pop went the other gun' and a baptismal 
flood of frothy cider such as the church people were 
not accustomed to use in that way, descended on 
the bald pate of the man in the next pew. It seems 
this man had become sleepy too and was at that 
moment dreaming of hooks, lines, and fishes. He 
awoke with a start calling out vehemently 'see 'em 
flop, see 'em flop.' 

The boy failed to convey the friend's compliments 
to his father" concluded the narrator and just then 



76 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the horse accommodatingly offered to stop at an old | 
gray and brick church with Norman tower which Mr. ' 
Butterworth said was where he once attended Sun- 
day School. This was not intended as a reference 
to tlie age of the animal. 

The long drive was one of "mixed pleasure and 
pain," as the visitors alternately noticed the fine 
views and waterscapes in the distance or commented 
on the probability that had the Norsemen landed on 
Thanksgiving day in that vicinity they would have 
found it so cold they would have turned back 
immediately. 

Finally the persevering but procrastinating nag 
turned up ngain to the Butterworth home. Here in 
a pretty two story house with modern Queen Anne 
roof lives Benjamin Butterwortli, the author's 
younger brother. Close beside it stood the square 
rambling old farmhouse, the survivor of a hundred 
years of sun and shadow, but now undergoing 
repairs and painted a gaudy yellow at which Roger 
Williams would have looked in horror and the 
Sachem Massasoit uttered a war-whoop of delight. 

Having had a brief but warm interview with a big 
stove indoors the party ascended the attic stairs 
and through a telescope the lenses of which were 
home made by Mr. John Butterworth, looked across 
the Bay and Taunton River to Fall River and the 
home of the Bordens. 

In the kitchen below Mrs, Benjamin Butterworth 
was flaying around and the big turkey was fast 
assuming an inviting appearance. In the dining- 
room the table was laid with its dark red and blue 
cover and the old fashioned, blue patterned china 
looked very attractive. 

In the sitting-room the visitors found two inter- 
esting maidens of decidedly dusky brunette type 
but very intelligent and bright. They had driven 
thirty miles to be there and meet their friend Mr. 
Butterworth and were introduced as the Misses 
Mitchell. They were small bodies both of them in 
spite of their names which upon more intimate 
acquaintance were discovered to be Wootenekenuske 
and Teweeleema, although the writer had to take a 
few lessons iu "Indian talk" before he could pro- 
nounce them as if he had"been to the manor born." 
The girls were bright and intelligent and of good 
education. They made quite merry over their dis- 
comfiture arising from a mistake in regard to the 
road. 



"What made you so late?" asked Mr. Butter- 
worth. 

"Oh, we got off the road. We found the dis- 
tance greater than we expected," said Wooteneke- 
nuske brightly. 

"Yes, I told her we'd have bad luck somewhere," 
laughed Teweeleema, "you see we met a pig when 
we were starting this morning." 

Teweeleema wore the Indian costume, short dark 
red dress and beads, while her sister wore an ordin- 
ary dress. 

Mr. Butterworth has visited these Indians at their 
home in the Lakevilie woods on the old Gov. Win- 
slow reservation. Their mother, Mrs. Mitchell, 
once taught a private school in Boston. She is now 
85 years old. 

Mr. Butterworth described his visit thus: "it 
was an autumn daj^ when I went to Lakevilie. 
There was a dreamy brightness in the air and as we 
passed into the shadow of the forest amid falling 
leaves and cool mosses, we seemed almost to be 
surrounded by the scenes of ancient Pokoneket in 
the days of Indian heroes. Some simple houses at 
last appeared amid the trees. Here I was met by 
three Indian women, one of whom was the Princess 
Teweeleema. It was her mother, however, that I 
wished most to see. She is perhaps the only aged 
representative of tiie race that once ruled in Pokon- 
oket. I was surprised at the freshness of the wo- 
man's face It was like a placid Quaker woman of 
40. Could this mild mannered, hospitable and gen- 
tle person be a descendant of the fiery Taspaquin ?" 

After the brown pan cakes, the Indian pudding 
baked with sweet apples, and the apple dumpling 
with potato crust had been disposed of and the old- 
fashioned pipe organ, built over a hundred years 
ago in Montreal had been used in accompaniment to 
the voices of the Indians and the others as they sung 
several familiar hymns, the gentle white Bucepha- 
lus was ushered around to the door and with a 
bright good night the dusky maidens were left be- 
hind. 

The whistling — but tardy — wheels of the "limited" 
soon bore the visitors toward that central locality 
sometimes called "the Hub" and if their subsequent 
dreams were haunted by big, strapping redskins 
with unpronounciable names, and white horsehairs 
grown to the size of a war-club, why, it must be 
remembered that Thanksgiving only comes once a 



AGGIE LIFE. 



77 



year and a long, cold ride isn't always condusive to 
good digestion. 

F. W. Davis, '89. 



ANNO UNO E ME NT. 
The Editors of the Index take pleasure in an- 
nouncing to the college and the general public that 
the twenty-fourth volume of that publication will be 
placed on sale the first of next week. Realizing 
that the influence of the college annual upon the 
prosperity of the institution has never before been 
as great as at the present time, we have endeavored 
to present a book that will in every respect be a 
credit to Alma Mater. While the general make up 
of the volume is similar to that of last year's publi- 
cation, we have added many new and attractive 
features. The number of pages has been consider- 
ably increased, and great expense has been incurred 
in secui'ing six full page "half tone" illustrations, 
four of which are group photographs and one a col- 
lection of views of the prominent college buildings. 
We have taken pains in the preparation of the data 
concerning the college organizations and especially 
of the Alumni lists, that the book may prove not 
only ornamental but useful to all who are interested 
in the welfare of the M. A. C. The increased num- 
ber of illustrations and the abundance of literary 
matter will we trust make the book interesting to 
alumni and all friends of the college. 

The Index Board. 



THE OPENING ENTERTAINMENT OF THE 
UNION LECTURE COURSE. 

It was noticeable that but few M. A. C. students 
attended the opening lecture of the Union Course, 
on Nov. 30th. Not one of us ought to have lost 
the opportunity We seldom have the privilege of 
hearing such a prominent and well known elocu- 
tionist as Prof. Hibberd of Wesleyau University. 
That he was well appreciated by the towns- people 
was evident from the large attendance, the hall 
being filled to overflowing. 

The audience was highly entertained for nearly 
two hours with a great variety of selections, which 
Prof. Hibberd has the knack of rendering in such 
an acceptable manner. The most sober of persons 
were obliged to give way to smiles, as the elocution- 



ist recited from Webster's Spelling-book or told the 
story of the man who saved souls on Sunday. 

It is of great value to hear such a noted elocu- 
tionist, because we are led to ask "How does he 
hold the attention of everyone? How did he ac- 
quire such power?" We often hear a reading or an 
address, which, although containing much interest- 
ing matter, does not seem to hold our attention. 
The secret then, lies in the man himself. There is 
not one of us but who would like to be able to 
speak well, and with power. How can we better 
accomplish this than by attending the Lecture 
Courses, which will give us a chance to study some 
of the best speakers that our country affords? 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION NOTICE. 

Before the end of this term the repairing of the old 
apparatus and the purchasing of new will be accom- 
plished, so that at the lieginning of next term we 
can hold our weekly indoor Athletic Meets. 

In order to obtain more competition than has here- 
tofore been shown, we propose to give a batiner to 
the class obtaining the largest number of points. 
The first prize to count 5, the second 3 and the 
third 1. There will be at the end of the winter 
term a final meet, and during the spring term a 
Field Day. Now that the best results may be 
obtained, let every man turn out and do his best to 
uphold the honor of his class and of the college. 

In other institutions these athletic contests have 
been of great success and benefit to the students 
and there is no reason why it should not be so here. 
We have plenty of material that is only waiting to 
be developed. The first issue of the Life next 
term will contain a schedule of events as they will 
occur each Saturday afternoon. 

The following will be among the various contests : 
sparring, wrestling, club swinging, climbing rope, 
floor tumbling, high kick, ruuuiug broad jump, 
standing broad jump, running high jump, standing 
high jump, pole vault, putting shot, half mile walk, 
half mile run, mile run, feats on the traveling and 
flying rings and on the parallel and horizontal bars. 
The various records will be published in the Aggie 
Life every two weeks. 

H. C. Davis, 
Pres. Ath. Asso. 



78 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Collc^? f>lot?S- 



—Subscribers please forward their 
subscriptions as soon as convenient. 

— The band has received new music. 

— A. C. Curtis, '94, was in IJoston last week. 

— J. E. Green, '96, was at his home in Spencer 
last week. 

— The Sophomores have adopted a text book in 
Chemistry. 

— The dam is at last completed. See back num- 
bers of Aggie Life. 

— Company drill is probably the order for the re- 
mainder of the term. 

— The Glee Club is rapidly getting into condition 
for the coming concert season. 

— The pond filled up in three days, but consider- 
able rain fell during that time. 

— Sellew, '95, was at home for a few days last 
week on account of a slight illness. 

— Sophomore final examinations in Trigonometry 
Wednesday and Thursday of last week. 

— Lounsbury, '94, and Shurtleff, '96, have been 
excused from drill on physicians' certificates. 

■ — The Seniors are now having practical work in 
the study of bones in the Veterinary department. 

— R. A. Cooley, '95, was obliged to be at home 
last week owing to the severe illness of his father. 

— Hereafter Senior privates are excused from 
drill, being required simply to report to the Major. 

— Pictures of the football team of this fall have 
appeared. Henderson, '93, has charge of the sale. 

— The rains of last week have done much to im- 
prove the prospects of our having good skating this 
winter. 

— F. J. Smith was detained from his customary 
position in the chemical laboratory by sickness last 
week. 

— New chairs have been placed in the reading- 
room and it is hoped that they will receive proper 
usage. 

— The Juniors have finished laboratory work and 
are now receiving lectures on zoology from Prof. 
Fernald. 



— The zoological museum will be open for the 
remainder of the term on Wednesday and Friday 
afternoons only. 

— F. C. Tobey, '94, has been elected Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Youug People's Society of Christian En- 
deavor of the Baptist church. 

— Several promotions have recently been made 
in the military department to fill vacancies among 
the non-commissioned ofiicers. 

— Why can we not hear the new bell rung for 
Sunday chapel ? It seems a pity that its only use 
should be the striking of the hours. 

— The orchestra furnished concert and dance mu- 
sic at the Free Mason's annual installation of offi- 
cers held at their quarters, Dec. 13. 

— A large number of the students are deriving 
great benefit from the gymnasium evenings. 9 to 10 
p. M. seems to be the popular hour. 

— Another business industry has appeared at 
college and the firm of Crib & Scribbler is prepared 
to furnish essays to order, — terms reasonable. 

— College exercises were held Sat., Dec. 3, to 
make up for the Monday after Thanksgiving which 
was conditionally allowed us to get back to college. 

— Baseball training will commence immediate- 
ly after the opening of the winter term. The sched- 
ule permitting, hard work will be done in the gym- 
nasium daily. 

— Lieut. Dickinson is to have charge of the work 
in mechanical drawing next term, and drawing in- 
struments are in order for '95, in preparation for 
the winter's work. 

— S. F. Howard, '94, tennis champion of the col- 
lege last year, won the same honor for 1893 bj' de- 
feating, A. B. Smith, '95, who took first place in 
the recent tournament. 

— The Sophomore class has taken up Mensura- 
tion which will be pushed as rapidly as possible, in 
order that more time may be given to field work in 
surveying in the Spring. 

— The Seniors have chosen Schillaire of North- 
ampton as class photographer. Those men from 
the under clases desiring Senior rates should com- 
municate with E. C. Howard, '93. 

— "Old Jed Frouty" was presented at the opera 
house last Friday night. This is not the first time 



AGGIE LIFE. 



79 



the company has favored Amherst and its reappear- 
ance caused the usual enthusiasm. 

— E. C. Howard, '93, and L. W. Smith, '93, 
were delegates from Alpha chapter to the Fifth 
General convention of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity, 
held with Gamma chapter of Cornell at Ithaca, Dec. 
1st and 2nd. 

— The last issue of Harper's Weekly contains a 
very vivid and interesting description of West Point 
Military Academy and its surroundings. Appro- 
priate illustratious also tend to give one a better 
idea of this historic place. 

— The plant house is now being heated by the 
new system of hot water healing. In the old sys- 
tem, the pipes were large and the circulation slow, 
but the present system is composed of banks of IJ 
inch pipe which give a rapid circulation. 

— The whole college with one or two exceptions 
were back and at chapel promptly after the Thanks- 
giving recess according to pledge. It shows that it 
is possible to stay at home a few days without be- 
coming so sick as to prevent one's coming back at 
the required time. 

— Monday evening, Dec. 12, Prof. J. W. Church- 
ill appeared in College hall in the fifth entertain, 
ment of the Amherst College lecture course. Those 
who accepted the opportunity- of hearing him, carried 
away nothing but the highest impressions of his 
ability as a reader. 

— At the winter meeting of the State Board of 
Agriculture, President Goodell lectured upon "Ag- 
riculture on the Channel Islands," Prof. Goess- 
mann upon ''The Work of the State Experiment 
Station," and Prof. Brooks upon "The Work of 
the Hatch Experiment Station." 

— A system of criticisms for Sophomore rhetori- 
cals has been introduced by Prof. Mills in which the 
members of the class are obliged to prepare written 
criticisms upon their fellow members. In this way 
by noticing the shortcomings of their classmates 
they are supposed to correct their own. 

— The athletic association is showing sure signs 
of life this year. The officers, themselves, have an 
interest in the matter, and have laid out money ju- 
diciously. With such manifestations of "push " at 
the head of the association, surely we can expect 
this branch of athletics will not be slighted as it has 
been in the past. 



— A singing school during the winter term is now 
talked of and it is probable that the movement will 
be successful. It has been the custom of the col- 
lege in past years to furnish instruction in vocal mu- 
sic during the winter term, but last year owing to a 
lack of funds the matter was dropped. There is no 
question but that vocal culture is of great benefit to 
those who enter heartily into it and as quite a num- 
ber of students seem inclined to take advantage of 
such instruction if offered, it is probable that a class 
will be formed with the opening of the coming term. 

—The meeting of the W. I. L. S. held Dec. 9, 
was not very well attended. As only one of the ap- 
pointed debators was present, the debate was extem- 
poraneous. The question discussed was : Resolved, 
that this institution should be co-educational. The 
following men took part : Spaulding, Koper, Hay- 
ward, and Potter in the affirmative ; Stockwell, 
Moore and Hawks in the negative. The merits of 
the question were decided in favor of the affirmative. 
The question decided upon for the next meeting 
was: Resolved, that a two years course in agricul- 
ture would be advisable in this college. The fol- 
lowing men were appointed to debate upon the sub- 
ject : in the affirmative, Staples, Smead and Lane, 
in the negative, Stockwell, Alderman and Pentecost. 



COMMUNIGA TION. 
To the Editors of Aggie Life : 

Gentlemen : — The following letter may be of 
interest to your readers ; at any rate I desire to call 
their attention to it and the personal appeal I 
make. 

Talladega College, Talladega, Ala., ) 
November 17th, 1892. j 
John A. Cdtter, M. D., 

Dear Friend : — A stormy day gives me an oppor- 
tunity to attend to some of my correspondence, and 
first of all I am going to redeem my promise to write 
you from the field regarding our most urgent needs 
and especially in my own department. Notwith- 
standing the short cotton crop and general depres- 
sion of business in this section, with the repeated 
cry of "hard times," we have opened the school 
year with a full attendance, and what is more en- 
couraging still, the increase is largely in the upper 
grades. The applications for aid have also increased, 
and how many will be able to go through the year it 



8o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



is hard to tell ; It is certain many cannot, unless aid 
comes from some source. Wlien aid is given, it is 
our policy, as far as possible, to have it come in the 
form of employineut. Having the student give some 
equivalent to the institution for money furnished, 
developes his independence and saves many from 
being ruined. 

Our great need, then, is money for student aid, 
that will enable those who havi some means to staj' 
throughout the year. Except in rare cases, it is 
difficult for a student during the three and one-half 
months of summer vacation to accumulate money 
sufficient to pay his expenses through the school 
year of eight and a half months, even though he 
works out of school hours. Aside from the above, 
we need more and better appliances for teaching 
those who are already here. In my own department 
(outside of a new barn for which special efforts are 
being made), I feel the need of a small greenhouse 
for the propagation of plants for practical instruc- 
tion in this branch of work. So far, I have been 
confined in my work to what could be done with a 
few hot-bed sashes in raising plants forour own gar 
den. These houses cannot take the place of a green- 
house. In the construction of the building all the 
labor can be done by the boys under supervision, 
giving to them aid and experience at the same time. 
The raw material is what we need, or rather the 
means to purchase it with. I have been promised 
by a florist in Providence, R. I., $25 on condition 
that a sufficient sum can be raised to put up the build- 
ing. Can you not see the way to help raise enough to 
enable me to make a beginning this Fall and secure 
the above promise? As a means of instruction and 
for propagating plants both for our gardens and the 
beautifying of our grounds, it would be of inestimable 
value and be a constant reminder of the donors. 
Trusting that you may be able to help us out in 
some of our needs, and thereby help towards a 
broader education some of these young men who 
come to us with longing desires for something better 
than they, have yet known or seen, with kindest 
regards, 

Yours in M. A. C, 

E. A. Bishop. 



Talladega College is a missionary institution for 
the education of the colored people and is manned 



by a splendid force of educated men, some of whom 
I am well acquainted with. Mr. Bishop is an M. A. 
C. graduate of 1883, and has been steadily at his 
post of farm superintendent for eight years. When 
he took his position, the farm could not winter six- 
teen head of stock without buying grain ; now he 
winters sixty head on the resources of the farm. 
In Alabama the subsoil is only eight inches below 
the surface and is very hard ; heavy rains sweep 
away the surface with the fertilizer the farmer has 
added, into the rivers to enrich the far southern 
states. Mr. Bishop instituted a system of terraces 
and holds all he puts on the soil. He sticks un- 
complainingly to his post ; the Southern Bourbon 
does not yet understand why educated and cultured 
northerners will devote their energies to educating 
the negro, the Bourbon says "the colored man can" 
not be educated and when educated he is lonely be- 
cause there is little culture amongst the blacks for 
him to associate with ;" such statements need no 
time for argument but are simply as matters of 
present belief. 

As a member of the class of 1882, called by 
scoffing 1881, the Charity Class, I was educated by 
the state and nation ; my college course cost me 
simply time. Wherever I was, there had to be ex- 
penses of food, clothing and room. More than that 
the state provided before we graduated a man to 
preach to us. 

If I am correctly informed, you that are now in 
college are under the same conditions ; the State 
and Nation are educating you. 

The condition of the colored man in the South is 
different ; he is dependent on himself and liberal 
men and women of the North ; the South is poor 
and in my judgment, the Blair bill for governmental 
aid of all the southern states will yet have to be 
passed. If I am wrong, then why does the culture 
and intelligence of the white man need governmental 
aid to run its Agricultural and Mechanical Colleges? 

Meeting Mr. Bishop in September and a few 
hours before, Mr. DeForest the President of the 
Institution and a graduate of Yale, I was profound- 
ly impressed with the simple plain story they told 
me of their work against ignorance and sin. It is 
not expected that all agree on the methods of 
churches and missionary societies ; but we can all 
stand on the platform that-any means that promote 



AGGIE LIFE. 



8i 



the welfare of man are good. 

Mr. Bishop writes me that if he can get one 
hundred dollars together he can commence on his 
work; $25.00 has been raised; I would ask that 
the students of M. A. C. give each twenty-five cents, 
the total to be turned over to President Goodell and 
on his receiving word that the balance of the one 
hundred dollars is raised to forward the sum to Mr. 
Bishop ; and if the amount is not raised, that Presi- 
dent Goodell refund the money to the students, the 
disposition of it to be determined by a mass 
meeting. 

John A. Cutter, M. D., '82. 
New York. 



umni 



otfs. 



The annual alumni dinner of the New York Al- 
umni Association of the M. A. C. was held at the 
Murray Hill Hotel, New York City, Dec. 7. 

—Charles O. Flagg, '72, John H. Washburn, '78, 
and P. M. Harwood, '75, were present at the Na- 
tional Farmer's Meeting held at Lincoln, Neb. 

'72. — Prof. S. T.Maynard, M. A. C, represented 
this college at the annual dinner of the New York 
Alumni Association held Dec. 7th at New York. 

'82. — Winthrop E. Stoue, 50 State St., Lafayette, 
Ind., Prof, of Organic and Inorganic Chemistry, 
and Director of the Chemical Laboratory at Perdue 
University has been elected Vice President of that 
institution. 

'87. — Dr. Frederick A. Davis, a graduate of Har- 
vard Medical School, class of '90, who has been 
stationed at tlie Mass. Eye and Ear Infirmary, has 
opened an office at 120 Charles St., Boston. His 
specialty is diseases of the eye. 

'87. — Frank S. Clark, Principal of the Evening 
High School, Lowell, was united in marriage to 
Miss Jessie M. Rich of that city, Dec. 2nd. 

'91. — Murray Ruggles is at present Superinten- 
dent of the Milton Electric Light Co. 

'91. — Malcolm A. Carpenter has been elected as- 
sistant Superintendent of the- Universalist Sunday 
School here in town. 

'92. — Henry B. Emerson is with the Edison Gen- 
eral Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 



'92.— William Fletcher, 138 Appleton St., is a 
clerk in the Western Ave. Freight Office of the B. 
& M. R. R. Co., Lowell, Mass. 

'92. — Charles S. Graham has accepted a position 
at the Lyman School for Boys, Westboro, Mass. 



•'GO ASK PAPA." 

"Go ask Papa," she softly said 
When I implored that she should wed. 
Ah ! human tongue can never tell 
How much I worshipped Isabel : — 
On hope of her my soul had fed. 

And tho' I'd hope for "yes"- Instead, 
Her words did not inspire dread ; 
I did not know my funeral knell 
Was "ask Papa." 

But when I found that he was dead, 
And learned the kind of life he led, 

I linew she meant — alas too well ! — 
What men would mean by "Go to H — 1 !" 
When she smiled and softly said 
"Go ask Papa." 

— Harvard Lampoon, 



Schillare's 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIN STItMET, - NOJtTBAMPTOlf, MA8M. 



82 



AGGIE LIFE. 



EXCHANGE NOTES. 

The living graduates of Princeton number 3587. 

Recitations atOberlin are prefaced by prayer and 
singing. 

Tlie sum of all the salaries of college professors is 
annually $80,000,000. 

Puck's advice to college students — go to bed early 
and avoid the rush. — Ex. 

Chicago University Freshmen have voted to wear 
caps and gowns continually. 

In his inaugural address Pres. Schurman stated 
that Cornell is worth $8,000,000. 

The University of Michigan has a .Japanese stu- 
dent association, with a membership of 13. 

Tlie University of Pennsylvania has lost but one 
game out of 16 this year and that to Yale. 

Eighty men are contributing to the Tale Record 
regularly, trying for positions upon its board. 

A corps of cavalry has been organized with the 
military department of the University of Iowa. 

The three greatest things in college at present are 
cap and gown, university extension and football. — 
Aegis. 

The 94 universities of Europe have 41,814 more 
students than the 360 universities of the United 
States. 

In New York state an intercollegiate press asso- 
ciation has been formed, including ten college 
papers. 

McKee of the Springfield Training School football 
team is to become football and gymnasium trainer at 
Iowa College. 

Sophomores and Freshmen at Cornell who attend 
drill without complete required equipments are 
marked absent. 

Women are admitted to the Yale gymnasium. 
Last year tliei'e were forty who availed themselves 
of the privilege. 

All but two of this yeav's Harvard football team 
were from Massachusetts while none of the Yale 
team were from New England. 

Of the Amherst Faculty 24 are Congregational- 
ists, 2 Episcopalians, 2 Baptists, 1 Catholic and 3 
who do not care to express themselves. 



It is reported that Wesleyan will voluntarily with- 
draw from the Intercollegiate Football Association. 
Cornell will apply for admission to take her place. 

The Senior class of Baltimore Medical College 
passed a resolution denouncing the use of foreign 
language, and they will use English in writing 
prescriptions. 

A full-sized portrait of Osgood the great Cornell 
half back has been placed in the gymnasium, exhib- 
iting his fine physical developmeut, as an example 
for Cornell athletes. 



gHfiS^S|HOfGU» 







FOK SALE BY 



No. 3 Soutli College, 

BOX 386, AMHERST, MASS. 
All correspondence will receive prompt attention. 



STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 



NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 

ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 

GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 

FIRST CLASS GOODS. FMICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH college:. 
AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-Opmt!Ye 

and Carpet Reiiovatiii Estaiilisiiiiieiil 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesdaj' delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



83 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 



"Lamps and Laiiip Gooiis areOors." 

WIIiJOIAMS' SLOCK, AMHEjRST, MA.SS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED #i SALE STABLE, 

T, L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMBEJtST, MASS. 



3. A. RAWSON, 

DEALER IN 

flTGHES, GIiOCHS, JEWEIiHY 



FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 



REPAIRSMG i^EATLY km ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



a 0. PEfig 



h 




.A.3yCH[EI?,Sa?, 



3i^.A.SS. 



The total average expenses of a regular course at 
Columbia is about $13 per week. 

The Yale base-ball trophy for hist yetir is a gold 
base-bail to be used as a watch charm. 

The WiUisionian proposes and urges Williston 
debating societies to engage in debates with Aggie, 
J5t. Hermon and other institutions. 

The Yale Literary Magazine is the oldest college 
periodical iu America. It began its fifty-eighth 
volume with the October number '92. 

The Phi Delta Theta fraternity has granted a 
charter to Princetou College. This will be the first 
chapter of any fraternity to establish there. 

It is almost certain that next year Harvard and 
Princeton will meet upon the foot-ball field, in con- 
nection with the triangular league with Yale. 

Ann Arbor has a lasting reputation ; at that insti- 
tution was originated the College Y. M. C. A. and 
National f_,eague of College Republican Clubs. 



NOTICUS. 

Mails leave the college for the post-ofBce at 1 p. m. and 
7-40 p. M. on week clays. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 p. M. 

Springtield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 p. m. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massa- 
chusetts, 7-45, 10-45, A. M. 400, 6-45 p. M. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-45 a. 
M. 4-00, 6 45 p. M. 

Noi'thampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 45, 8-30 p. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. M. 

The President will be at his office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 3 to 5 
p. M. ou Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the term. 

The college library will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m. and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 

The museum of natural history will be open to 
visitors from 4-30 to 5-30 p. m. Mondays, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays; from 3 to 4 p. m. Wednesdays, 
and Fridays. Will be closed Saturdays and 
Sundays. 



84 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LAEGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes I Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 

^^-(f^O-E'S SHOE STOI^E, 
-v^ij-.uiA^i^s' block;. 



Sheet Music, 



Miasic Books, 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUI-PAR, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 

.^DENTISTS. 3;.. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUIS^TINGTON, D. D. S. 

CUTLJEM'S BLOCK, A.MHERST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOUES: 
9 .A.. IvI. TO S P. 3VI. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

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Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PK,ICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



^rugs. Medicines, 

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Order your €/0^£ here. 

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Fnr §nits and Fall Overoaats 

CALL AT OCR STORS NEXT TO THE BANK. 

FINE ITAL Al FAIENCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, §3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, .$2.00, $2.50 and $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O. G. COUCM & SON'S. 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseau, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

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Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass, 



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Amtierst House Block, 



Amtierst, lass, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

T'ANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

iletalUc Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and niglit calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



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THE PHOTO EHJLFHE] 



1892. 



NENA/ SKY LiaHX. 
ENLARGED OPERATING ROOM. 

CLASS AND SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY. 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



^. g. Di(?i{i!::^goci D. D. g. 

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Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., l-:iO to 5 p. m. 



^^Ether and Nitrons Oxide Gas administered wiien 
desired. 



A.T TKB 



AMHERST GASH SHGE STQREi 

Tou can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



A. GLYNN, 



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Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specially. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



jVIilitapy Suits and Trimmings. 



assachusetts Aaricultural Colleae, 




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AGGIE LIFE. 



J.MHERBT, MJ.EiH., JEM. IB, i.BBl3. 



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f ^Lrp^n•t^r & Mor^Kous^, 



♦ BRlMJFEiRS, 



» 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRlCULTURy^L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FEUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



THE ABIHERST 

FUpUflE >ND CAR 



D 



inn 



STOrtE. 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, STUDY 
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WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 



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CASH DEALERS IX 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



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CASH DEALERS IN 



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HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



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BOOTS AND SHOES 



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A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
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FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All Goods STRICTLY CASH and at 

LOWEST PRICES. 

E. D. JVT^RSH, 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



EiBE>A-l:RIIsrC3- IDO]>TB ]?K.01vIFTL~5r. 



T, W. SLOAN, 
a PH<ENix now. 



^rai^tkal Blarriber, 

SJEA.'H AMO> G/\S FITTER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heating a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., JANUARY 18, 1893. 



No. =8 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS : 

G. F. CUKLEY, '93, Editor-in-Chief, 

J. K. PERRY, '93, Business Manager, 

E. C. HOWARD, '93, F. S. HOYT, '93, 

'A. E. MELENDY, '93. C. F. WALKER, '94, 

T. S. BACOX, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

T. P. FOLEY, '95. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



tV*^tU"\H V Wl^t-A^lMSt^ ?l\H'^t?.S. 



itr@riais, 



It is with pleasure tliat we note tlie re-appoint- 
ment of J. Howe Deinond of Northampton, as one 
of the Trustees of the college. He has always been 
foremost in advocating evciytliiug which tended to 
promote the welfaiv of the institution and we feel 
confident that his interest manifested toward us in 
the past will be continued. 



The continued cold weather during the early 
part of this term has again brought forth the old 
complaint of cold rooms in South College. Were 
this the first t.me, the fault might be said to be that 
of those having charge of the steam-heating appar- 
atus. But it is not this for year after year the same 
"Ijick" has been made. If the present apparatus 
is not of sufficient size to keep all the rooms com- 
fortable we think that it is time suitable apparatus 
was furnished. 



It would be a great accommodation to the stu- 
dents if it could be arranged so that the term re- 



ports might be sent a little more promptly. A few 
years ago it was customary for the students to re- 
ceive their reports four oi five days after the term 
closed. Now we do not receive them until after 
our return to college duties and hence are kept in 
suspense as to the result of the previous term's 
work. It may be that the delay is unavoidable but 
it is hoped it may be arranged so that they shall be 
sent more promptly in the future. 



The prospect of a boom in our athletics is greater 
than ever before and at this season so early in the 
year is an opportune time for every student to add 
one more resolve to his set of "New Year's resolu- 
tions," which every one is supposed to have made, 
and that is a habit of regular"iiym"practice. There 
are many men in college who could make good 
records if they would only attempt it. The Ath- 
letic Association has certainly performed its duty 
in affording us so many new and improved appli- 
ances ai:d they are continually increasing our 
hitherto poorly equipped "gym." There are to be 
held weekly meets during this term and a suitable 
trophy will be awarded the class securing the great- 
est number of points and we have it on good 
authority that there will be a field-day this spring. 
Let every student look upon this work as a dnt}^ 
not only to himself, but to his class and his college. 



During the latter part of last term we received 
and published several communications from mem- 
bers of our alumni which without doubt interested 
the other alumni as they certainly did the students. 
With this number we commence the work of a new 
term and it seems appropriate that we should re- 
turn thanks to our alumni contributors for past 
favors while we hope that so interesting a depart- 
ment of the Life will not hereafter be allowed to 
decline. As has so often been said in the past, 
an^- word from our alumni always helps to bring us 



86 



AGGIE LIFE. 



undergraduates into closer sympathy with those who 
have gone out before us and on whom so much of 
the success of our alma mater depends. Perfect 
co-operation of students and graduates is particu- 
larly essential if any such improvement as the new 
athletic field proposed bv one of our alumni profes- 
sors is to be carried through with success. We bid 
you welcome then, alumni reader, to a free use of 
our pages for 1893 and we trust that one of your 
New Year resolutions has been a renewed determi- 
nation to give your support to our college paper. 



Now that the winter term is well underway, the 
regular base-ball practice has begun and will con- 
tinue through the remainder of the year. But, as 
in former j-ears, the amount of money to carry on 
this work is extremely limited and consequently 
great care must be taken to avoid unnecessary' ex- 
penditures. It has been noticed in the past that 
one great source of loss has been occasioned by 
theft. This may surprise some, but there are those 
in college to whom the fact is not unknown. Some 
of those very same men would undoubtedly ridicule 
the idea of their taking a dollar from a student's 
pocket, and yet they seem to argue that no harm 
is done if they take a few base-balls or a glove 
from the association. That is all right. May be 
they pay their subscriptions and are sorry for it 
afterwards, thus tiiking these measures to get back 
the coveted dollar. But more likely if the culprits 
were discovered, it would be shown that their sub- 
scriptions remain unpaid. Be that as it may this 
evil must be done away with. Let the rights of the 
association be respected and observed and there will 
be no more trouble about this matter. 



It is safe to predict that in a short time the 
campus that has served us so long and faithfully as 
our athletic grounds will have to give way to a 
suitable and eonvenientlj' arranged athletic field. The 
use of the necessary land has been granted by the 
tiustees for the purpose and under the able director- 
ship of Professor Brooks, to whom all credit is due 
for the origin of the plan, it only remains for 
the alumni to generously respond to the call of their 
alma mater, for the idea to materialize. There is, 
perhaps, nothing at the present time which would 
give so decided an impetus to our athletic sports as 



the placing at the disposal of the base-ball and foot- 
ball teams such an athletic field. The proposed lo- 
cation being within easy access to the town, in all 
probability we can expect a much larger patronage 
from the townspeople than they have given us in 
the past and the gate receipts will furnish a solu- 
tion to the question of finances with which the 
managemeut of our base-ball and foot-ball teams 
are constantly being confronted. As ex[)lained in 
the article printed in this issue the college confident- 
ly looks to tlie alumni for the funds requisite for 
the accomplishment of the project. We trust that 
there are many among that body who will consider 
it a privilege and an honor to show their interest 
in the welfare of the college by acting favorably on 
any appeals which shall be made to them in the in- 
terest of our athletic field. 



Nearly every institution of learning publishes 
annually a descriptive "catalogue" which contains 
such information as is of service to all who may be 
interested in the welfare of the college or school it 
represents. Such a publication is of especial use to 
those who are expecting to enter the institution as 
students. The "Annual Report of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College," commonly known as the 
college catalogue, is such a publication, and is gen- 
erally distributed for advertising purposes. It 
differs, however, from the publications of most 
other institutions in that it is itself a public docu- 
ment printed by the state. Being the official re- 
port of the board of trustees to the legislature, it 
must necessarily contain reports from every depart- 
ment of the college that is aided by the public 
funds. The Hatch Experiment Station is thus in- 
cluded. Moreover, during the last few years it has 
been customary to take advantage of the fact that 
the report is a public document to append to it 
essays on scientific subjects, generally of an agri- 
cultural nature, with the intention of reaching a 
large number of farmers and agricultural thinkers, 
and thus raising the general standard of the agri- 
culture of the stale. Such being the case, the 
present catalogue is a bulky document that has the 
apnearance more of a treatise on scientific agricul- 
ture than a college catalogue. Upon examination, 
the Information that is generally of the most im- 
portance in such a publication is found to be crowd- 



AGGIE LIFE- 



87 



ed into a few pages in the back of the book, while 
a large space is taken up with a discussion of farm 
crops, stock and agricultural experiments. The 
college catalogue as the official report of the trus- 
tees, aud a public document for distribution among 
the farmers of the state cannot be unfavorably 
criticised, but as the advertising circular of a New 
England college for distribution among the students 
and instructors, aud their friends, and amoug the 
young men of the state whose interest the college 
is trying to secure, the catalogue is not as it should 
be. Nothing would meet with more favor from the 
students and the large number of outside friends of 
the college than a special illustrated circular of the 
college, for advertising purposes. Such a publica- 
tion need contain only the courses of study, the re- 
quirements (or admission, a description of tho equip- 
ment and facilities and a list of instructors and 
students. It could be made both attractive and in- 
teresting and would doubtless much more than re- 
pay the cost of its preparation. 



^on'tribu-ted. 



A CONTAGIOUS CUSTOM. 

If a custom were good in direct ratio to its age 
and extension, then well might the custom of bor- 
rowing claim to possess the highest excellence. Its 
origin is lost in the darkness of pre-historic days. 
The first notice of it in recorded history occurs in 
Exodus ; and it is mentioned in such a way as to 
lead to the inference that it was not a recent inven- 
tion. Moreover, the custom had then become so 
well established or else the people were so well 
advanced in the arts of civilization, that they forgot 
to return what they borrowed. This proves that the 
custom was the same in principle then as now. 

In later times, and with good reason, the leoder 
was extolled as a model of virtue, while, at the 
present daj', credit is the basis of the commercial 
and social worlds. 

The articles borrowed include all known objects. 
Gods, religions, languages, inventions, customs, 
manners, all sorts of material things, in short, 
everything, even to sweethearts, has been bor- 
rowed. Many seem to delight in borrowing trouble ; 
as if that were not the one thing in the universe that 
will come of its own accord as soon as it is wanted. 



"Don't cross a bridge before you come to it," seems 
to have been omitted from their juvenile copy-books. 
But those that borrow trouble can claim that they 
violate no moral law in omitting to return it, and 
that assertion might tend to ease the conscience of 
the professional borrower, if such can be said to 
have a conscience. 

With some, borrowing is a mania. They borrow 
things that they need aud things that they have no 
use for ; it is as impossible for them to meet you 
without requesting the loan of something as it would 
bo for them to return it without being asked. It 
seems to be a disease as truly as kleptomania which 
is, in some respects, much like it. 

There are others who are sometimes appropriately 
termed "spouges." These borrow upon principle. 
They claim that the world owes them a living ; but 
instead of collecting this debt by honest work or 
open stealing, they borrow. It never seems to 
occur to them that they are violating the command, 
"In the sweat of thy brow shalt thou eat bread." 
They firmly believe that "Sufficient unto the day is 
the evil thereof ; " and if once located in a good 
neighborhood where lenders are long-suffering, they 
settle down and obey the injunction, "Take no 
thought for the morrow." The fable of the ant and 
the cricket has no lesson for such. 

College life offers many opportunities for the 
practice of borrowing. Note-books, exercises, ex- 
amples, examination papers, as well as numeroua 
articles used in sports and in our daily life furnish 
material for the exercise of this habit. 

The patience and good-humor required to keep 
one's temper when considering the persistency in 
borrowing and neglecting to return, exhibited by 
some is in itself a preparation for entrance into the 
realms of bliss whose chief attraction seems, at 
times, to lie in the fact that there will be no borrow- 
ing there. 

Notwithstanding the abuse of borrowing, the fact 
that the majority of people are willing to lend seems 
to be an indication that we are coming more and 
more to believe in the brotherhood of man. The 
truth of man's fiaternity, so loudly proclaimed at 
the time of the French Revolution, finds a more sure 
and powerful expression in the many deeds of kind- 
ness between man and man, and the growing real- 
ization of the dependence of the unit upon the mass 
aud the obligations of the individual to society. 

F. L. G. 



88 



AGGIE LIFE. 



NEW COURSE OF STUDY. 

We auDounce with pleasure that the change pro- 
posed in the regular course of study together with 
the introduction of a two years' course has at last 
been arranged, presented to the trustees and 
adopted by them and will probably go into effect 
with the beginning of the next collegiate year. A 
complete plan of the two courses and also of a 
graduate course has lieen prepared and we regret 
that space will permit us to print only an outline of it. 

First, the two years' course : Its objects as 
stated in the plan are, primarily, to help farmers' 
eons and others who propose to follow some branch 
of agriculture, wiio lack either the time or the means 
required for the longer course. 

.Secondly, in so far as practicable to serve as 
preparation for the regular college course. Upon 
satisfactory completion diplomas will be granted. 
For admission the applicant mast be fifteen years of 
age and must pass a satisfactory examination in 
English Grammar, Geegraphy, Arithmetic and the 
History of the United States, the standard required 
being 65 per cent. 

The course includes all the elementary mathemat- 
ical branches, both field and class-room work : 
English, Chemistry without laboratory work, Latin, 
Botany, Horticulture and kindred subjects. Physi- 
ology, Zoology and Entomology, Veterinary Science 
and Agriculture in its more important branches. 
The whole course comprises 72 weeks averaging 
18.5 hours per week. 

In the four years' course the principle charge is 
in the increased requirements for admission and in 
making the Senior studies entirely elective. 

For admission candidates must be sixteen years 
of age and must pass satisfactorily in the following 
studies: Arithtretic, Grammar, Geography, U. S. 
History, Metric System, Algebra — through Quad- 
ratics, Physiology, Geometry — two books, Physical 
Geography, Civil Government. and Latin— grammar 
and ten chapters Caesar. For the first three years 
the course is about as at present except that addi- 
tional work in English is required throughout. Ex- 
cepting the required two hours of English and one 
of military the studies of the Senior year are 
entirely elective, three studies being chosen from 
the following list: Agriculture, Botany, Forestry, 
Entomology, Chemistry, Veterinary Science, Math- 



ematics, Electricity, English, Social Science, Mil- 
itary Science and German. As at present upon the 
completion of the course the degree B. Sc. is con- 
ferred. 

The plan of the graduate course we give in full : 

1. No honorary degrees shall be conferred. 

2. No applicant shall be eligible to the degree 
M. S. until he has received the degree of Bachelor 
of Science or its equivalent. 

3. The faculty shall offer a course of study in 
each of the following subjects : Mathematics and 
Physics, Chemistry, Agriculture and Botany, Ento- 
mology, Veterinary. Upon the completion of any 
two of which, the applicant shall receive the degree 
of M. S. 

This prescribed work, however, may be done in 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College, or at any 
institution that the applicant may choose ; but in 
either case the degree shall be conferred only after 
passing an examination at the college under such 
rules and regulations as may be prescribed. 

4. Every student in the Graduate Course shall 
pay $100 to the Treasurer of the college before 
rrceiving the degree of M. S. 



ATHLETIC FIELD MOVEMENT. 

To THE Board of Trdstees, 

Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Gentlemen : I respectfully ask you to appropriate 
to the use of the students of this college so much of 
the land (not to exceed five acres) belonging to the 
college and lying on the south side of the high- 
way leading through the college estate from Amherst 
towards Plainville, in the town of Hadley, as may 
be needed as a field for athletic sports. It is my 
wish that permission be granted to improve for 
athletic purposes by clearing and drainage, and to 
enclose by means of suitable fences so much of the 
land (not to exceed, as stated above, five acres) as 
may be hereafter agreed upon. I desire further 
that permission be granted to erect a grand-stand 
and any other structures appropriate to the uses to 
which the land is to be put. 

It is not expected nor desired that any part of the 
necessary expenses shall be borne by the college. 
An attempt will be made to provide for the improve- 
ment of the grounds by means of private subscrip- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



89 



tions from the alumni ; and unless means sufflcient 
to make the grounds an ornament to the Institution 
be forthcoming the attempt will be abandoned. 

Athletic sports are at present carried on by our 
students at a great disadvantage, since the want of 
enclosed grounds makes it impossilile to derive any 
portion of the funds necessary to support them from 
gate receipts. However such sports may be looked 
upon, it should be recognized that our students will 
always carry them on ; and I submit that, to the 
end that as much good and as little harm as may be 
may come from them, it is pesi to wisely encourage 
and control in so far as may be possible. The 
ground, the use of which is asked for, lies outside 
of the improved area of the college estate ; it is 
covered with a young grovv^th of forest trees; it is 
not needed as a forest, and the growth of the Insti- 
tution can hardly be such as to make it necessary 
for other purposes. Farther, it lies apart from the 
greater portion of the estate, having been cut off by 
the highway above mentioned, which has been built 
since the college was established here. 

In view of all these points it scarcely seems to me 
that the land can be put to any better use than the 
one for which I ask it ; and in the hope that this 
petition mav be granted, I remain, 
Most respectfully yours, 

Wm. p. Brooks, 

Professor of Agriculture. 

President Goodeil carried the above petition to 
the Trustees, and " they refused to let such a good 
opportunity go by" and granted it. Professor 
Brooks has undertaken to put the matter through, 
and we do not doubt but that he will soon have the 
funds necessary to go forward with the plan. At a 
mass-meeting held last Frida\', a committee con- 
sisting of the president and secretary of the athletic 
association, captain and mauager of the base-ball 
team, and captain and manager of the foot-ball 
team, was appointed to co-operate with Professor 
Brooks in the elections of a location, and in any other 
way possible. The alumni will be called upon to 
supply funds with which to carry on the work of 
clearing up the land, draining, building of grand- 
stand, etc., and as fast as the funds are received 
the work will be pushed. Alt friends of the college 
will feel an interest in this movement, and it is 
hoped that the plan will have a speedy and success- 
ful termination. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION NOTICE. 

In order that the college may more readily under- 
stand what is being done by the Athletic Associa- 
tion, and how it is expending its money, perhaps a 
few words of explanation are necessary. 

The $68 that was received from the Ahimni to- 
gether with about 810 tliat was taken from other 
sources has been expended for the follovFing appa- 
ratus and fixtures : — spring board, hitch and kick 
machine, mat, boxing gloves, dome for punch-bag, 
cupboard, standard and cross iiieces, coat rack, 
vaulting Hoard and fixing the ladder, parallel bars 
and chest weights. 

About $95 has already been collected towards the 
college tax, and as soon as $50 has beeu received, 
there will be purchased a nest of dumb-bells, anoth- 
er set of boxing gloves, a short banner and perhaps 
a pair of scales and another pair of flying rings. 
The latter will be hung from one of the beams and 
will swing lengthwise of the hall instead of across as 
the old ones do. 

Now the sooner every man pays his tax the better 
it will be for himself and for the college. Of course 
there are many other things that we should like to 
have and in fact almost need, but our supply of 
money is limited ; and yet with good work on each 
man's part with the apparatus that we now have, 
the best of results may be obtained. 

On next Saturday afternoon at 3-30 o'clock, we 
will hold our first weekly indoor meet. The events 
consisting of potato race, standing broad jump, 
running broad jump and rope climb are all so easy 
that every one can and ought, in fact, to compete 
for the prize. As soon as possible the banner will 
be obtained and placed in some exposed place, so 
that all can see what is to be the reward of the 
class obtaining the largest number of points. 

The name of the winning class will be woven in 
one corner which is expected to be a very neat one 
and of a handsome design. It will be given each 
year to the winning class. So that for one class to 
hold it for more than one year, they will have to be 
champions for two or more consecutive years. 

H. C. Davis, Pres. Ath. Ass'n. 



A meeting of the country's prominent educators 
was held last week to consider the necessary 
requirements for entrance to colleges. 



go 



AGGIE LIFE. 



folle^^ ^ot^j. 



SCHEDULE. 

GENERAL EXERCISES. 
8-15 A. M., Chapel. I 10-30 A. M.. Church, Sunday. 

8-30 A. M., Inspection Rooms, Sat. | 4-00 p. M., Drill, M. W. Th. 
CLASS EXERCISES. 

JUNIOR. 



.'SENIOR. 

A. M. 

8-30. Political Economy 



9-30. Agriculture, M. T. W. 

Meteorology, Th. F, 
10-30. Chemistry, M. T. W. 

Military Science. Th. 

Law, V. 
11-30. Veterinary Science. 

p. M. 
1-45. English, Th. 

SOPHOMORE. 

A. M. 

8-30. Drawing, M. 

Mensuration, W. Th. F. 
9-30. Drawing, M. 

French. T. W. Th. F. 
10-30. Botany, M. 

Physiology, T. \V. Th. F. 
11-30. Botany, M. 

English, T. VV. 
Drawing, Th. 
P. M. 
1-45. Botany, T. 

Drawing, W. 



English Literature, M. W. 
Chemistry, T. 
Agriculture, Th. F. 
English Literature, M. 
Zoology, T. W. Th. 
Chemistry, M. W. 
Physics. T. Th. F. 

Chemistry, M. T. W. 
English, F. 

Chemistry, Th. 
FRESHMAN. 

Military Science, Th. 

Latin, M. T. Th. F. 

English, W. 

Agi-iculture, M. T. W. Th. 

English, F. 

Algebra. 



Drawing, M. Th. 



— Amherst College opened Jan. 6. 

— Base -ball practice began last Monday. 

— Ice cutting is being carried on at the pond. 

— Freshman chemistry has been omitted this 
term. 

— Sanderson, '94, is now rooming at the D. G. K 
house. 

— The sale of Indexes has been unusually large 
this year. 

— H. E. Clark, '95, spent a short time at home 
last week. 

— W. C. Duffleld, '95, and T. Walsh, '96, have 
left college. 

— The members of Co's A and B have received 
new equipments. 

— Prof. Warner was absent from college last 
Tuesday and Wednesday. 



— The Seniors have begun taking their sittings 
for class photos at Schillaire's. 

— Frank E. Paige, ex-treasurer of the college, 
paid a flying visit here last week. 

— Lieut. VV. M. Dickinson passed the vacation 
at the home of his brother in Boston. 

— The Glee Club will give their first concert of 
the season at North Hadley, Jan. 20. 

— Lieut. Dickinson will have charge of the de- 
partment of mechanical drawing this term. 

— k good deal of enthusiasm has been occasioned 
on the score of the proposed athletic field. 

— The College orchestra furnished music at a 
concert and ball held in Ashby, Mass., Jan. 4. 

— The collection and analyzing of the soils of this 
state has been completed by Prof. Brooks and assis- 
tants. 

— There will lie sent to Chicago a map of the col- 
lege grounds locating the buildings and also the 
roads. 

— According to the schedule, no class has more 
than twenty-one hours per week of recitations, ex- 
clusive of drill. 

— Prof. Mills was present at the Williams College 
Alumni Dinner held at the Parker House, Boston, 
Wed., Jan. 11. 

— Several men were quite late in returning to col- 
lege after the Christmas vacation. Some have not 
even returned as yet. 

— A new flag has been purchased to be floated 
from the staff next spring. Until then a "storm" 
flag will be emplojed. 

— W. L. Pentecost, '96, received the contract for 
carrying the mail duri.ig the winter term. H. W. 
Moore acts as substitute. 

— A class in dancing, composed of M.A.C. students 
has been started for Friday evenings under the 
direction of Prof. Petit. 

— J. Howe Demond, of Northampton, has been 
reappointed as one of the trustees of this college, 
his term having expired. 

— The screens have been put on the remainder of 
the Drill Hall windows so that batting practice may 
be carried on this winter without the usual breakage 
of glass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



91 



— A short mass meeting was held at old Chapel 
last Friday for the purpose of considering business 
relating to the Athletic field. 

— Prof. Wm. P. Brooks delivered a lecture upon 
the subject of Drainage before the Norfolk County 
Pomona Grange last Wednesday. 

— The commissioned officers of the battalion are 
excused from drill one day per week. The privi- 
lege is greatly appreciated by them. 

— An exhibition of the gypsy moth in all its 
stages will be sent to Chicago from this college. 
The work is in charge of Prof. Fernald. 

— Pres. Goodell and Prof. Goessmanu attended 
the meeting of the Board of Ex[)eriment Station 
Directors held at Boston, Monday, .Jan. 9. 

— Professors Walker and Bliils represented the 
college at a conference held in Springfield, Jan. 13, 
to consider the subject of University Extension. 

— It is high time the students should begin to 
compete for positions on the Life Board. As yet 
we have heard but little from the two lower classes. 
— The last entertainment of the Union course 
was given in the Town Hall Wednesday evening, 
Jan. 11, by the Heuschel Quartette of Springfield. 
— The Athletic Association has levied a tax of 
fifty cents on each member of the college. With 
the money thus raised additional apparatus will be 
purchased. 

— The Junior class will continue the study of 
mechanics a short time before commencing the new 
text book on physics that has been selected for 
use this term. 

— Pres. Goodell is to lecture at Sunderland, Jan. 
25, on "Reminiscences of the Orient." The lecture 
is one of a series given under the auspices of the 
Excelsior Lecture Course. 

— Until further orders the drill for the week will 
include sabre and bayonet exercises and squad drill. 
On Thursdays the whole battalion will be drilled in 
the school of the company. 

— R. E. Smith, '94, has left college to enter into 
the architectural business with his father. His loss 
is felt by the college, leaving vacant the position 
of foot-ball manager for next season. 

— Lovell, the photographer, is engaged in secur- 
ing photographs of the different lecture rooms, lab- 



oratories, etc. to send as a portion of the exhibition 
of this college at the Columbian Exposition. 

— The Forestry Exhibit of this state is being pre- 
pared under the direction of Prof. Maynard and he 
is also in charge of the plaster casts representing 
the progress of Horticulture and Agriculture. 

— There has been quite an addition made to the 
gymnasium apparatus which will probably be great- 
ly appreciated by those who have made New Year 
resolves to frequent the gymnasium every day. 

— The January bulletin of the Hatch Experiment 
Station will be issued by the division of entomology 
and will contain numerous illustrations. An edition 
of 45,000 copies will be printed for distribution. 

— A number of the students under the direction 
of the polo association cleared the snow from a por- 
tion of the pond last week. It is intended if possi- 
ble to overflow a space sufficient for polo practice. 

— A large number of the students availed them- 
selves of the excellent skating on the Connecticut 
river Saturday the 7th, one party going up the river 
to Turners Falls, the other southerly to Springfield. 

— Owing to a broken grate in one of the furnaces 
the heat dispensed in South College during a con- 
siderable portion of last week, was quite inadequate 
to the needs of the students who became quite en- 
vious of the comforts enjoyed by their North Col- 
lege neighbors. 

— The singing school held its first session on the 
evening of the 10th under the direction of Prof. 
Charmbury, with a large attendance. It is to be 
hoped that the students will maintain their interest 
and not let it flag after a few sessions, as has been 
too often the case in past years. 

— The Chemistry Department has finally, after 
many delays, received a large amount of costly ap- 
paratus for practical laboratory work. This addi- 
tion places the department upon a good foundation 
for the coming year. 

— ^The following are the Ninety-six oflBcers : Presi- 
dent, Asa S. Kinney; Vice-president, Walter J. 
Curley ; Secretary, Walter B. Harper ; Treasurer, 
Fred'k H. Read ; Historian, Frank L. Clapp ; Class 
Captain, Horace C. Burrington ; Sergeant-at-arms, 
William B. Dodge ; Base-Ball Captain, Patrick A. 
Leamy ; Polo Captain, James L. Marshall. 



92 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The class of '95 has elected the following offi- 
cers for the coming term : President, F. C. Tobey ; 
Vice-president, Jasper Marsh ; Secretary-Treasurer, 
C. W. Crehore ; Historian, C. B. Lane ; Class Cap- 
tain, H. B. Read; Base Ball Captain, E. H. Clark; 
Polo Captain, E. O. Bagg. 

— At a meeting of the Washington Irving Liter- 
ary society held Friday, Jan. 6, the following ofHcers 
were elected for the ensuing term : president, John 
E. Gifford, '94; vice-president, Harry G.Stockwell, 
'94 ; secretary, Frederick C. Tobey, '95 ; treasurer, 
Daniel C. Potter, '95 ; directors, Francis T.Harlow, 
,93, Horace P. Smead, '94, Robert A. Cooley, '95. 

— At the regular term meeting of the class of '94, 
held Jan. 9, the following officers were elected for 
the ensuing term: President, A. J. Morse; Vice- 
president, G. H. Merwin ; Secretary, H. G. Stock- 
well ; Treasurer, C. H. Spaulding; Class Captain, 
E. L. Boardraan ; Sergeant-at-arms, T. S. Bacon. 
The historian, Mr. Keith, elected last term, holds 
office for one year. 

— The department of English has adopted a new 
rule this term. There has been observed so much 
procrastination in regard to theses that it has been 
decided upon that any man in the Senior class fail- 
ing to deliver his oration at the appointed time, 
shall not be allowed another opportunity but will go 
upon the records as conditioned, the condition to be 
made up the following term. 

— Friday evening, Jan. 13, the sixth entertain- 
ment of the Amherst College lecture course was 
held at College Hall. The Lotus Glee Club gave 
the concert and those who have ever heard this 
Quartette need not be told that the evening was 
was plcasurably spent. The recitations by Miss 
Minnie Marshall were also a very enjoyable feature. 

— During the vacation, conditioned men were 
notified of the state of their affairs. The marks of 
the Freshmen were also sent them before the term 
opened, but the remainder of the college were 
obliged to remain iu suspense. 



Louis M. Pasteur, to whom chemistry and biology 
owe so much, recently celebrated his seventieth 
birthday. The ceremonies were held at the 
French Academy of Science and, in acknowledgment 
of his lofty scientific standing, he was presented 
with the gold medal of the Academy. 



NINETY-FOUR'S INDEX. 

According to custom, the Index appeared just 
before the holidays, and fulfilled beyond a question 
the promises of the board of editors in being an 
excellent publication. It was expected that it 
would be the best publication of its kind yet issued 
by a Junior class at the Agricultural College, and 
we were not disappointed in our expectations. 
Ninety-four's JncZea; has retained the leading features 
of previous publications, and has added some very 
pleasing new features. Perhaps the most noticeable 
thing about it is the increased number of full page 
cuts of college organizations, there being five of 
these. A decided improvement over previous issues 
is the half tone at the head of the statistics of secret 
societies, a cut of such a character being a decided 
improvement over the pen and ink sketches which 
have heretofore headed this department. The liter- 
ary portion is exceptionally good, "A Faculty 
Meeting" being the best of the prose productions, 
while the poetry is uniformly good. If any discrim- 
ination is to be made with regard to the latter, it 
might, perhaps, be said that the class poem and 
"Tempus Fugit" deserve especial mention for excel- 
lence. The "grinds" as a whole are very good and 
well deserved. If however any adverse criticism of 
the work is to be made, it might be to question the 
good taste of "grinding" men who are not connected 
with the college at the time the Index is published, 
or whose term of service as iustructoror student has 
expired. 

The Ninely-four board has started a movement 
in the right direction in offering to give what aid is 
in its power lo the next board, giving as a reason 
that the Index is a college publication and represents 
the whole college and not any special class or fac- 
tion. If succeeding classes will follow the example 
which the last Index board promises to set, we will 
see a still more marked improvement in the Junior 
annual publication. 

In addition to this leading subject, several matters 
of direct interest to the student body are discussed 
on the editorial pages, the matter of bequests, the 
College Senate, the Fraternity house question and 
others. 

Taken as a whole \he class of Ninetj'-four is to 
be congratulated on the publication of an Index 
which so faithfully portrays the workings of the 
student body as viewed by those who are "in the 
swim." 



AGGIE LIFE. 



93 



REPORT OF FOOT-BALL MANAGER. 



Eec'd of Treasurer, 




$409.50 




Gate Receipts, 




22.58 




Eec'd of Trinity, 




30.00 




" " Amherst, 




5.00 




" " W. P. I., 




35.00 




'■ " Mt. Hermon, 




20.00 




" Harvard '96. 




45.00 




Total receipts, 


$567.08 




Stationery, 






$ 1.55 


Printing. 






13.25 


Postage, 






2.93 


Laundry, 






2.00 


Barge and Carriage hire. 






17.75 


Supplies, 






45.81 


Uniforms, 






49.05 


Telegrams, 






7.50 


Expressing, 






.75 


Umpiring and CoacMng, 






35.35 


Sundry Traveling Expenses, 






11.73 


Labor, 






20.88 


Paid W. P. I., 






35.00 


" Mt, Hermon, 






20.00 


" Williston, 






15.00 


" Boston University, 






50.00 


'• Springfield Y. M. C. A., 






15.00 


Expenses of Hartford trip. 






57.45 


" " Worcester trip. 






62.09 


" " Mt. Hermon trip. 






28.80 


" " Cambridge trip. 






65.39 




$557.28 


Paid Treasurer to balance acco 


unt. 




9.80 




$567.08 


Respectfully Submitted, 








F. H. Henderson. 


Alumni 


fiotfs. 





'81. — Charles L. Flint of Boston, the donor of 
the Flint prizes, delivered his lecture, "Across llie 
Continent," in the town hall, last Monday evening. 
Mr. Flint is an interesting speaker and his lecture 
and illustrations were highly appreciated by the 
students and townspeople. 

'81. — •Elmer D. Howe of Marlboro has been ap- 
pointed by Gov. Russell as one of the trustees of 
this college and at a meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees he was elected as one of the Directors of the 
Experiment Station in place of Thomas P. Root, of 
Barre Plains, whose term had expired. 



'88. — E. H. Belden is with the General Electric 
Co., Denver, Colo. 

'89. — Charles L. Marshall, of Lowell, has been 
elected Chairman of Institute Committee, Middlesex 
North Agricultural Society. 

'91. — A. G. EamesandH. J.Eield, post-graduate 
students at Cornell, visited here during their vaca- 
tion. 

'91 — H. M. Howard, with W. A. Davenport, ex- 
'91, Market Gardeners, Watertown, Mass., spenta 
few days here last week. 

'92.— F. H. Plumb, of Short Hills, N. J., made 
a short visit here last week. 

'92. — H. E. Crane has been made a member of 
the firm of F. H. Crane & Son, Wholesale Grain 
Dealers, Quincy, Mass. 



FOOT-BALL VS. FINANCE. 
The foot-ball crank was all forlorn 

Yale could not break the V. 
The sport replied with broken voice 

"Why don't they give it to me?" 



Schillare's 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A, J. SCHILLARE. 



108 MAIN STS.EET, - JfOBTBAMPTOlT, MASS. 



94 



AGGIE LIFE. 



LEAD LEADS. 

"Oh, what is mightier than the pen?" 

A gold-bound "fountain" cried. 
"I am. of course," a pencil then 

Boldly to it replied, 
"Since man first found a graphite bed 

And learned the way to ply it. 
He's made me so I've always lead; 

Dare you, Sir Pen, deny it?" 



ALAS! TOO TRUE. 
A little pin than sharply pricks, 

A mountain seems, of woe; 
The little second band that ticks. 

Seems indolent and slow. 

But time outlives our little pain 
The second band moves on ; 

And ere we note its pace again. 
The weary hour is gone. 



—Ex. 



BACK NUMBERS BEST. 

"What magazine is best? Come, tell!" 

I asked three maids one day ; 
"The Cosmopolitan," cried Nell, 

"The Century," cried May. 

With merry twinkle in her eye 

And saucy mein, sweet Bess 

Declared — I know the reason why — 

"I love the College Press." 

— Univ. Cynic. 

^ 

INTERCOLLEGIATE CLATTER. 
Dartmouth Freshmen have adopted a neat class 
button. 

Smith College Calendar, just out, shows 786 
students. 

Colgate College has been without a president for 
three \'ears. 

Yale has had twelve presidents since Its founda- 
tion in 1701. 

The Univ. of i'cnn. Courier is a new paper 
devoted entirely to athletics. 

Brown has a ladies' bowling club which holds 
weekly meets in the Gymnasium. 

The U. of M. chorus, numbering 300 voices, will 
sing at the World's Fair in May. 

By Subscribing $10 each the students of Colum- 
bia have begun a gymnasium fund. — Hiram 
Advance. 



Ex-Pres. Haves has been re-elected president of 
the board of trustees of the Ohio State Univ. 

Leland Stanford University is the only American 
university giving free tuition in all its branches. 

After June, 1894, the entrance requirements at 
Cornell will be entirely changed. — Brown Herald. 

Principal parts of the verb "•fluuco :" — "flunco, 
flunkere, suspeudi, expulsion." — Miami Student. 

The Columbian number of the Johns Hopkins 
University, a volume of nearly 100 pages, has lately 
been issued. 



SWIFT DOUBLE ACTION REVOLVER. 



.5-sliot 38 calibre 'v 1- >Sk™™i,^ti^ ™ 
using ;« S. and wX'^' '^^f » 

C. F. cartridges. , _^ 

The Beauty, Material and if \- S,,'' 
WortmaBship UnequiUei. ^^--a^c . J 
The Most Iniprovi-d Double 

Action Revolver in the Market. 

Price S70, By maii., postpaid. 




THE BOSTON BULL. DOG REVOI-VER $3.SS. 

THE CHAMPION SHOT GUN ONt-Y $12. OO. 

FOR SALE BY 

I. C. GREENE, 

BOX 386, - - - AMHERST, MASS. 

All correspondence will receive prompt attention. 



STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 
FIRST CLASS OOODS. PRICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH college:. 
AMHERST COLLEGE 

and Carpet Reiiovatini Estaljlisiiiiient 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates ^for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

office: 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 






AGGIE LIFE. 



95 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 

HeaflpaflER tor Sliiil^s Sipplies. 

" Lamps M Lamp Goods are Ours." 



Mellopp ^ 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, JLjaBEBST, WASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED #i SALE STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Prop'R 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

EURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. A. RAWS 



DEALER IN 



WfiTGHES, GIiOCRS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

riNE BTS.TianERY. 
REPAIRING NEATLY A*IO ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



a 0. PEfiSE 




.A.lVni3[EI?,ST, 



3vrjft.ss. 



Instead of publishing an annual next year Rose 
Polytechnic Institute vvlll build a gymnasium. 
Entertainments will be held to raise a part of the 
funds. 

A quartette from the glee club at the Univ. of 
Vermont has volunteered to slug in the sick wards 
of the Mary Fletcher Hospital at Burlington on 
Sunday afternoons. 



T. M. C. A. TOPICS. 
Jan. 19. — Confusing Good with Evil. Is. v : 20 ; 
Matt, xxiii: 16-26. E. H. Alderman. 
22. — Sing Aloud uuto God. (Prayer and 
Praise Meeting.) Ps. lxxxi : 1; Col. 
hi: 16. E. D. White. 
26. — The Divine Purpose in Human Affliction. 
II Cor. XII- 7-10 ; Heb. xii : 5-13. P. E. 
Davis. 
Jan. 26. — The Comfort of being a Christian. 
Il Tim. i:12; I John iv:15-19. L.J. 
Shepard. 



Jan. 



Jan. 



NOTICES. 

Mails leave the college for the post-office at 1 p. m. and 
7-40 p. M. on week clays. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as foUows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Springfield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 p. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massa- 
chusetts, 7-45, 10-45, A. M. 4 00, 6-45 p. m. 

Fitcliburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-45 a. 
M. 4-00, 6 45 p. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 45, 8-30 p. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. M. 

The President will be at his office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 3 to 5 
p. M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays througliout 
the term. 

The Museum of Natural History will be open to 
visitors on INtondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and 
Fridays from 2 45 to 3-45 p. m. 

The college library will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m. and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 



5(6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LAEGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes I Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 

^.A-O-E'S SHOE STOIESE, 



Slieet Music, 



Music Books. 



Strings 

FOR THE. VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEU F 

AMHERST, MASS. 

,g^ DENTISTS, ^a, 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CJITLEJt'S BXiOCK, A.MBEKST, MASS. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONTECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PMTSICJAJIS' PMBSCRIFTION8 CASMrTII.IjT 
COMVOVUDED, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCEXIX ROW. 

Order your COA^ bere. 



WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUAKTERS FOB 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODGETT k CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



OFFICE HOURS : 
S A.. IvI. TO 5 F. lyc. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

PINE GOODS! LOW PBICES! 

GOOD WORK WAREANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



Far Suits and Fall Overccaats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



FINE ITAL m FAIENCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, $2.50 AND $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O. G. COUcH & SON'S. 
FRANK C. [T.ITMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseaij, 

RAZORS HONED. 

Wood's House Amherst, Mass. 



OFFICE OF 

EDWARD' A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cooh's BlocJCf Ainherst, Mass, 






iHi 



1^11 



H 



FREeH Azni fost:. 



DEOEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst House Block, 



Amtierst, Wlass. 






NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure DruQ^s and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sundav and night calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850 



1892. 



THE PHOTO SHSFHER 



ne:na/ sky light, 
bnlargeid operating room. 

CLASS AND SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY. 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



5. g. DI?H1(^PC)(5. D- D- 5- 

DENXAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to h p. m. 



|^="EtheT and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T THE 



AMHERST GASH SH0E ST0RE 

You can i^et the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



\ 



A. GLYNN, 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



Pilitai^y Suits and Tmmmings. 



assachusetts Aaricultural Colleae, 



"~i 



-■«W!!«*s^,^,(^OeB^ 



IMmM 



S^^L- 




A.ixiLl:ie^r»«^t« ^^<Io-«^«s. 



/^■^ r-t^^t'^x-^^'^'^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



JLMHERBT, M.EBB., FEB. i, Iflgs. 



¥"0L. III. 2fD. S. 



• BRINTDRS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

"We wonlcl inform the friends of tlie college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FKUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS. 



G, H, SANDERSON & CO., 



CASH DEALERS IN 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



SyiNDEI|SOI( & TH0MPS0I(, 



CASH DEALERS rN 



THE MHERST 




}m CARPET 



3TOR,E. 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, Mi^TTRESSES, PILLOWS, STUDY 
DESKS AN D CHAjRS, LOUNGE S. 

WINDOW SH ADES . DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS, 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

istje:b:e:ib o-oohds. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



RBE'^a^IK.IKrCS- XiOaSTB FK.OIiAS'TL'sr. 



T, W. SLOAN, 



All Goods STKICTLT GABH and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 

E. 13. m:a.rse[. 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



'ran&al Blaniber, 



CAS riTTER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steism ami Mot Water Heatins a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., FEBRUARY 1, 189,3. 



No. 9 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
AaTicultui'al Colleare. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance- 



Single copies. 10c. 



Entered at tlie Post Oflicc as secoud-class mail matter. 



BOARD Of EDITORS: 

G. F. CUELET, '»3, Editor-in-Chief, 

J. R, PEERT, '93, Business Manager, 

E. C. HOWARD, '93, F. S. HOTT, '93, 

A. E. MELENDY, '93. C. F. WALKER, '94, 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

T. P. FOLEY, '95. 

Please address all commuuications to the Business Manairer. 



^V^V^Va^^ V VVQ^tV«^l>i%t^ ^^\U"\t^^. 



liToriais. 



The Alumni Club of Boston aud vicinity has in- 
stituted a pleasing custom in Uolding a veceptiou in 
connection witli its annual meeting, in honor of the 
faculty of the college and ihe Board of Agriculture. 
Such a movement commends itself to all lovers of 
the college, as it once more brings those who were 
once students, into close contact with their former 
instructors or those who are now occupying the old 
familiar places, aud the men who, from the position 
the}' occupy, as well as from high individual motives, 
have the interest of the college at heart. By such 
steps as this, the club is showing itself worthy of a 
high rank as an alumni organization. 



Perhaps no recent step in athletic legislation has 
attracted tnore attention than the movement on foot 
among Yale men to bar graduate students from 
their athletic teams, and while this procedure will 
greatly weaken several teams from prominent uni- 
versities, no fair minded man will dispute the fact 
that Yale is doing much to purify college athletics. 



Thus far too many men have been taking merely a 
nominal course in some graduate school, for the 
whole purpose of occupying a position on an ath- 
letic team. Better that athletics in our colleges 
should die out altogether, than be reduced to the 
level of professionalism or semi-professionalism. 
But with such restrictions as Yale favors putting 
upon her athletes, college athletics will still hold the 
honored place among sports, which they have so 
long maintained. 



The need of a new floor in the gym. was never 
more noticeable than at the present time and some- 
thing should be done to remedy the existing evil. 
The number of students who practice there is greater 
than ever before and in view of the weekly athletic 
meets it is certain that the number will increase 
rather than decrease. The dust arising from the 
present floor is not only an inconvenience but it is 
positively detrimental to the health of those who 
practice there and we often hear a remark to the 
effect that others would enter into practice were it 
not for the dusty condition of the hall. Not only 
is the complaint heard during practice and base-ball 
training but also at drill. After one or two com- 
panies have marched about the hall the dust arising 
is so thick as to render objects at the further end 
of the hall almost indistinct. We trust that a new 
floor will soon be forthcoming but if not immediate- 
ly we would suggest that the gym. floor be swept 
more frequently and occasionally sprinkled which 
would at least serve to render it less dusty than at 
present. 



Up to the present time competition for positions 
on the editorial board has been very slight compar- 
ed with what it should be. While undoubtedly 
there are many men in college who aspire to be edi- 
tors on the Life, it is a noticeable fact, that, either 



98 



AGGIE LIFE. 



from lack of ambition or from pure indolence, tlie 
literary aid tendered by the students in general falls 
far short of what is expected in an institution. 
Especially at this time of the year, tlie amount of 
•material, from which to make selections, should be 
abundant and varied in character. It is from these 
contributions that the succeeding board must be 
selected, so the importance of having each man, 
with any marked literary ability, try his hardest to 
be elected to the editorial board, cannot be too 
strongly emphasized. There now remain to be 
published hut three more issues this term. Wliat 
-does this mean? It simply signifies that there are 
but three more opportunities for aspirants to the 
Life board to make known their ability and to 
manifest their interest in the publication. Let none 
of the remaiuino; time be lost. 



The custom of placing photogra|)hs of the college 
organizations in the library is a good one and 
should by all means be continued. Not only do 
the pictures contribute to the attractiveness of the 
room in which they are placed, but they neves fail 
to be of special interest to visitors, and will ever be 
valuable for reference. No student fails to orna- 
ment the walls of his room with pictures of class 
and society, while the gaily ribboned photogrixph of 
the victorious team to which he belonged is not left 
out of the collection. To these he attaches great 
value and never fails to point to them with justifi- 
able pride whenever showing his friends aliout the 
place. When, however, he leaves college, he takes 
them with him, and a few years afterward the in- 
quiring student who is interested in the history of 
his alma mater finds naught but statistics and tra- 
dition to remind him of the accomplishments of 
those who came before him. The idea of placing 
all college photographs on file iu the library has 
been mentioned before in the columns of the Life 
but we believe it is not out place to urge the matter 
once more trusting that it will meet with favor from 
the sludimt body. 



According to the reconstructed course of study, 
the former policy of the College is to be pursued, in 
granting no honorary degrees. While at first thought 
it may seem as if our college was not keeping pace 
with other colleges in this respect, a serious consid- 



eration of the question will show that we are not 
behind. Granting such degrees as Doctor of Divini- 
ty, Doctor of Laws, and like honors, to men who 
are eminent in certain professions, is an excellent 
thing when given by an institution whose aim is the 
education of men for the Christian ministry or the 
practice of Law, but our institution has a different 
aim ; tliat of producing scientific workers and scien- 
tific thinkers. As in the world of science, eveiy 
gain in knowledge must be attained hy careful 
study and personal investigation, so iu the honors 
given by a scieutific college, something should be 
gained by direct work and personal effort before the 
man is considered worthy to receive the Bachelor's 
or the Master's degree. Every man who goes out 
from our college bearing its degree, may feel a 
justifiable pride in the fact that he has earned it, 
and every one who keeps informed as to the policy 
of the college in this matter will feel a confidence 
iu him who bears its degree, because the letters B. 
S. or M. S. will be conclusive proof that work 
has actually Deen done which will eminently fit the 
man for the station in life which he is called to fill. 



Within a short time, a series of events connected 
with the interests of our institution have occurred, 
which are to be important factors in its future pros- 
perity. For many years decided improvements 
have been gradually made in all dejiartmeuts of the 
college, but it is doubtful if in its history there has 
been a period of such marked progressiveness as 
has characterized the last few months. It is need- 
less to recount the adoption ct the new curriculum 
of study, the movement on foot for the preparation 
of the atliletic field and the recent decisions of the 
trustees in regard to alterations in the college build- 
ings and grounds. No close observer of the condi- 
tion of our institutiou can conclude otherwise than 
that the near future has in store for those in 
authority proljlems to be decided which will affect 
even more vitally than the decisions of the past, 
the interests of tire college. Iu fact the college has 
reached a point where to fulfill the needs of the 
time it must grow and enlarge the range of its in- 
fluence. All friends of the college await the de- 
velopments of the future with only hopeful and en- 
couraging anticipations. Tlie alumni and under- 
graduates feel assured that the college of their 



AGGIE LIFE. 



99 



choice will make sucli acliievements in the I'uture as 
to completely overshadow the glory of the past and 
consequently they are appreciating more and more 
the prestige which they have received because of 
their connection with their alma mater. 



onxrmu 



OUR COLLEGE PAPER OUGHT TO BE 
BETTER SUPPORTED. 

From time to time the editors find it necessary to 
complain that our college pulilicatiou, the Life does 
not receive the support that ought to be given it. 
A large number of the alumni are indifferent towards 
it, or at any rate are deadly silent, and there is but 
little competition for positions on the editorial board 
by the students themselves, who ought to be fore- 
most in upholding their college paper and in making 
it accomplish the purpose for which it was originally 
intended. As a result, the burden of the work is 
thrown upon the shoulders of the nine editors. 

Now there is no doubt whatever but that every 
man in college, if he set himself to work, could 
write a creditable article, and one well worthy of 
being printed in the Life. Why, then, is our paper 
not better supported by the studeuts? Do they 
realize that it is an honor to be chosen to a position 
on the board ? Do they realize that whether editors 
or not the practice which the writing involves is well 
worth all time and labor required? This is not all. 
Every student should be so interested in tlie VFelfare 
of his college that he should endeavor to raise its 
paper to the highest standard possible. 

In regard to our other source of support the 
alumni, why is it that the board are constantly cry- 
ing out for their aid ? Why do they not show more 
interest in their alma mater by contributing to the 
columns of its bi-weekly publication ? W'e do not 
know. We can only say that probably they are so 
full of business that all thought of college days and 
alma mater is driven from their minds. This is a 
lamentable fact, if true. It pains us to think that 
those who have gone on before are unable to And 
time to give their successors an occasional word of 
encouragement or a little friendly advice. We 
want our paper improved by a greater vai'iety of 
views and opinions expressed in its columns. 



Let us hope that as class after class is added to 
the ranks of the alumni, this body will be more 
responsive to the many invitations thrown out by 
the editors of the Life. Whether they are or not, 
by all means let us resolve that while we are in col- 
lege we will sustain our paper to the best of our 
ability, and that when the time shall come for us to 
join the throng of alumni, provided such is in store 
for us, we will ever be readj- to take up the pen and 
give our young college brothers the support that we 
ourselves so much desire. 

G. H. M. 



COLLEGE TRADITIONS. 

With the founding of every college there come in 
certain customs which are handed down from class 
to class and at last become so interwoven with the 
life of the college that they seem to be a part of it. 
These customs, which have at last become traditions, 
are closely followed up, year after year, even when 
the causes to which they owe their origin have 
[lassed away. Some of these traditions are of no 
value to the college, or are even harmful in their ef- 
fect, while others tend to lift us up to a higher 
level. 

It seems to be a natural custom in all colleges, 
although it is fast passing awa}', to give new comers 
what might be called an initiation. This at times 
may be productive of some good by showing a per- 
son in what light he is looked upon by his mates. 
But even in these cases it is more liable to have a 
harmful than a beneficial effect. And when it comes 
to petty persecutions upon an}' single person it is 
carrying the matter a little too far. This custom, 
although not wholly done away with in this college, is 
not kept up to any great extent, and it would be 
for the best interests of all concerned, were it en- 
tirely dropped. 

As all of us know, it has here been a custom for the 
Freshmen to hold a jubilee upon the completion of 
their first year. Up to last year, such a celebration 
had been held about the college grounds and was 
marked by frequent clashes between the classes and 
at times almost degenerated into a free fight. Last 
year, however, the class of '95 deciding to institute a 
reform, celebrated their Freshman night by going 
to Brattlcboro, Vt., and enjoying a fine supper. 
The consequence was that the night was as peaceful 



100 



AGGIE LIFE. 



and quiet as any other night in the year. The good 
effects of holding the celebration out of town have 
been seen by all of the upper-class men, and I be- 
lieve that the general sentiment of tiie college is in 
favor of the method which '95 so successfully car- 
ried out. It would be for the best interests of the 
class of '96 and of the college if the example which 
'95 has set were followed this year. At the time 
when the affair takes place there are many strangers 
in town who will be prejudiced against the college if 
there i.s anything going on which is at all disorderly'. 
Other reasons might be given why the clase ot '96 
should celebrate Freshman night out of town, but 
they have already been rehearsed so I will not re- 
peat them. 

I have thus far spoken of some of the things 
which just come to mind when speaking of college 
traditions, but tliere are other matters which are 
also handed down from class to class, which are of a 
different nature. There is a spirit of brotherly love 
which is handed down from the earliest classes. 
There is a seeming bond which binds us with those 
who have gone before and which is reaching out to 
grasp those who shall come after us. There is a 
bond of brotherly feeling and love which binds us to 
each other and to the memories of college life. i\Iay 
this bond grow stronger and stronger as the years 
shall pass so that wherever we may be we shall ever 
feel the fostering influence of our Alma Mater. 

J. E. G. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION NOTICE. 

The athletic directors having decided to continue 
the custom of holding indoor meets, have prepared 
a schedule with four events for each Saturday after- 
noon during the term. 

To create more competition among classes than 
has been shown heretofore, the following system of 
giving, points has been adopted : In each event the 
man securing the first place obtains for his class 
five points ; second place three points ; and third 
place, one point. 

In the spring a field day will be held and the same 
method of giving points will be continued, and the 
banner will be presented to the class that has se- 
cured the greatest number of points during the 
year. 

The first and second indoor meets were held Jan- 



uary 21 and 28 and if the interest shown by the 
students at these meets is continued throughout the 
year the field day will prove an assured success. 
Below is a list of winners for January 21 and 28 ; 
Indoor Meet, Saturday January 21, 1893. 
Potato Race. 
1st, Gifford, '94. 
2nd, Baker, '93. 
3d, Hemeuway, '95. 

Standing Broad Jump. 
1st, F. A. Smith, '93. 
2nd, Toole, '95. 
3d, L. H. Bacon, '94. 

Rope Climb. 
1st, H. J. Fowler, '94. 
2nd, Lewis, '94. 
3d, Meleudy, '93. 

Running Broad Jump. 
1st, Baker, '93. 
2ud, Gifford, '94. 
3d, Toole, '95. 
Points by classes, — '94 — 17. 
'93—13. 
'95—6. 
Indoor Meet, Saturday, January 28, 1893. 

Twenty- five Yard Dash. 
1st, Gifford, '94. 
2nd, Tinoco, '93. 
3d, Baker, '93. 

Standing High Jump. 
1st, Manley, '94. 
2nd, Putnam, '94. 
3d, Jones, '95. 

Horizontal Bar. 
1st, Howard, '94. 
2nd, Tinoco, '93. 
3d, White, '94. 

Hitch and Kick. 
1st, Boardman, '94. 
2nd, Hubbard, '96. 
3d, Morse, '95.^ 
Points by classes, — '94 — 24. 
'93—7 
'96—3 
'95—2 
Per Order, 
H. C. Davis, Pres., 
Lowell Manley, Sec. & Treas. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lOI 



FLORAL COLORS. 

We all admire the beauty of flowers with their 
rich variety ot colors, rivaling, nay, excelling the 
rainbow in brilliancy and number of hues. But 
how often do we think of the cause of this great 
diversity of colors in what the poet called " earth's 
stars?" 

I do not mean a reference to the thought that we 
owe all this beauty to God. I refer rather to the 
instrumentalities which, controlled by the immutable 
laws of the great Primal Cause, unconscious of 
their work, have brought about this richness of col- 
oring that helps to make our earth so beautiful. 

Botanical genealogists tell us that all or nearly all 
of the primitive flowers were yellow. Why did the 
color cease to lie universal in the floral world? Was 
it to provide an ever varying beauty for our e^'es? 
Hardly that ; yet in the economy of Nature such 
effects often follow the workings of her laws as in 
this instance. What advantage belongs to a plant 
that has a highly colored floral envelope ? To 
answer this we must consider certain phases of 
insect life and their relations to plant life. 

The wise provision of Nature to prevent self-fer- 
tilization with its weakening effects on all life has 
led to the utilization of insects as carriers of pollen 
from one plant to another. The insects do this 
unwittingly in their search for honey or for the pol- 
len itself. But how are they attracted to the flowers ? 
By different senses according to the nature of the 
insect. 

The larger butterflies and the bee tribe seem to 
be attracted by bright colors while other and 
smaller insects depend chiefly upon odors as guides 
to their favorite flowers. As the larger insects can 
be more surely depended upon to convey the golden 
dust from one plant to another those species which 
by their brilliant hues most surely attract their 
winged friends will be more certain to perpetuate 
their kind. 

To illustrate this let us take the case of a plant 
in that early stage of the world's history when all 
flowers were yellow. By some chance a flower hap- 
pened to come white. The causes for this are not 
known. It is what is technically called a "sport," 
that is a freak of Nature. These "sports" are 
produced about us now and, so far as known, 
always have been. To return to this individual 



case, it is easily seen that it would be very conspic- 
uous among its yellow neighbors. When matured 
it was visited by pollen-bearing insects attracted by 
what seemed to them to be its greater beauty. 
Thus was ensured the [lerfection of its seed while 
perhaps others of the same species were undevel- 
oped. The color descended to flowers produced 
from this seed and they in turn were more surely 
fertilized than their yellow cousins. In time the 
greater vigor of the plants bearing the white flowers 
and the loss of vitality by the yellow ones of that 
species caused the destruction of the latter and the 
white remained victor, firmly settled as the color of 
that kind. If, perchance, a red sport should be 
developed on this white species, that might, in time, 
change the characteristic color to red by the same 
means. 

The insect's scale of beauty in colors so far as 
known seems to be, beginning with the lowest, as 
follows : yellow, white, red, pink, and blue or 
purple. 

This application of the doctrines of "Natural 
Selection" and "the survival of the fittest" seems to 
explain in part the great variety of colors in flowers. 
Considering the effects of crossing varieties and the 
changes produced by local environment with the 
results of insect fertilization we can explain any 
color or combination of colors in our beautiful 
favorites. 

F. L. G. 



A MODERN MIRACLE. 

Her eyes are symbols of her preference 

Her orient eyes of deep cernlean blue, 
For she herself has said the evidence 

To man that she's a Yale girl through and through. 

When a Harvard man expostulated, 
Naively she spoke, "When I my colors hide — 

A thing which never can be consumated 
While I can see — then I'll be on your side!" 

But lo ! when I, one day, my deep love told her, 
I saw her silk-lashed eyelids droop and furl 

The blue — the crimson on her cheeks grew bolder, 
Thus self confessed she was a Harvard girl. 

— Harvard Lampoon. 



There are seven college dailies in the United 
States, two semi-weeklies, 55 bi-weeklies, 44 weekly 
288 monthlies and over 100 bi-monthlies. 



102 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Collect ^Io-tf$. 



— Stevens, '95, was sick last week. 

— Prof. Warner did not meet bis classes last 
Friday. 

— A. E. Melendy has been suffering from a slight 
attack of sickness. 

— H. F. Staples, '93, was kept from recitations 
last week by sickness. 

— The Juniors had their final examination in me- 
chanics last Thursday. 

— J. E. Gifford, '94, now has charge of the Nat- 
ural History Museum. 

— The next concert by the Glee Club will be given 
at Sunderland, Feb. 3. 

— Tlie Seniors have been having "grinds" in Vet- 
erinary the past week. 

— The orchestra furnished music for the Co. K 
ball on the evening of the 20th. 

— Dr. Paige recently performed quite a diflScult 
operation before the Senior class. 

• — Cutter, '94, is taking a short vacation at home 
to recuperate after his severe illness. 

— The Freshman class was photographed last 
Saturday at Schillare's, Northami)tou. 

— Quite a large number of tlie students work 
faithfully in the "Gym." every evening. 

— E. J. Walker, '93, was called home suddenly 
last week to attend the funeral of a relative. 

— The frequency of snow storms has rendered 
skating on the pond this term an impossibilitj'. 

— The rigor of the unexcused absence rule is 
having its effect on the attendance at recitations. 

— Jacob Parker, ex-'94, has accepted a position 
in Kingman's Pork Packing House, of Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

— The icy walks about the college buildings give 
an uncomfortable vivacity to the lower extremities 
of pedestrians. 

— Several members of '95 attended the PhilaMay 
Concert Co's entertainment at Old Deerfield last 
Wednesday evening. 

— The glee club gave its first concert of the sea- 
son before a rather small audience at North Hadley, 
Friday evening, Jan. 20. 



— L. Manley, '94, has been elected foot-ball man- 
ager for the coming season, in place of R.E. Smith, 
'94, who has left college. 

— Lieut. Totten, formerly military instructor here, 
has resigned his position in the U. S. Army and 
will follow literary pursuits. 

— A number of the students availed themselves 
of the privilege of hearing Dr. John Hall at Amherst 
College church, last Thursday. 

— The Hampshire Agricultural society held an in- 
stitute at Sunderland Jan. 31. Subject: "Money 
Crops." Essays were read by practical men. 

— President Goodell lectured at Sunderland, Wed. 
Jan. 25, upon "Reminiscences of the Orient" under 
the auspices of the Excelsior Lecture Course. 

— Certain students in certain entries of the dor- 
mitories would do well to select some other time for 
their play hour than the quiet of evening vvhen a few 
would like to study. 

— Quite a number of the members of the three 
lower classes are taking advantage of the Seniors' 
rates to have their photographs taken at Schillare's 
studio at Northampton. 

— G. F. Curley, '93, will represent the Life at 
the informal reception and supper to the Board of 
Agiiculture and Faculty of the college, held at the 
Quincy House, Boston, this evening. 

— John Baker, an escaped Siberian exile, speaks 
in the Union Lecture course at the town hall to-night. 
He suppresses his real name through fear of being 
recaptured and taken back to bondage. 

— The Day of Prayer for colleges was observed 
here the first hour of Thursday morning. Addresses 
were delivered by Prof. W. S. Tyler of Amherst 
College, and Profs. Fernald and Mills of the college. 

— There has been danger that the water supply 
would be cut off fiom the college grounds on ac- 
count of the prolonged cold weather which has re- 
sulted in ranch damage to the water pipes about 
town. ^ 

— Dr. C. A. Goessmann lectured before the Wor- 
cester North Agricultural Society at Leominster 
last Thursda3'. His subject was "Commercial Feed 
Stuffs." Last Friday he addressed the Franklin 
Harvest Club at Greenfield on "Winter Feeding of 
Dairy Stock." 



AGGIE LIFE. 



103 



— Base-ball practice began about two weeks ago, 
and the prospects for a good team nest season are 
exceptionally bright. Seven of last year's men are 
in college besides substitutes. These, with some 
very good Freshman material, should make an un- 
usually strong body from which to choose the team 
and it is to be iioped that the men will continue to 
work with unrelaxing interest until the base-ball 
season is over. 

— On the evening of Friday, Jan. 20, Prof, and 
Mrs. S. T. Maynard received the Junior class at 
their home. The evening passed swiftly while the 
guests were solving puzzles and testing the accuracy 
of their sense perceptions. A dainty collation was 
served, and music iiiciudiug favorite college songs 
added to the pleasure of tl'.e occasion. At a late 
hour the party broke up and each one carried away 
with him memories of a most pleasant evening. 

— The seventh lecture of the Amherst College 
Course was delivered in College Hall, Friday evening, 
Jan. 26, by Thomas Weutworth Higginsou. His 
subject was '-The Aristocracy ofthe Dollar." Mr. 
Higginsou had a large and appreciative audience 
whom he completely held during the whole of his 
discourse, his style being especially adapted to the 
handling of the economic subject of his lecture. 
The Association showed very good judgement in 
securing an evening from this distinguished gentle- 
man. 

— At the Annual Meeting of the Trustees of the 
Agricultural College held at Boston, January 12, 
1893, a special committee was appointed to look into 
the matter of a new barn, etc., with instructions to 
report at an early date. It was voted that the 
money received from the executor of the will of the 
late T. O. H. P. Burnham be known as the Burnham 
Emergency Fund and that it be kept intact and that 
the income from it be used by the Trustees for such 
purposes as they may believe to be for the best in- 
terests of the College. It was reported that the 
Board of State Managers of the World's Columbian 
Exposition had allowed the College $720 for ex- 
penses of the College exhibit. The old officers 
were re-elected. The new Trustee, Elmer D. Howe 
81, of Marlborough, was assigned to the Committee 
on Course of Study and Faculty, and J^ H. Demond 
and Elmer D. Howe were elected members of the 
Board of Control of tbe State Agricultural Experi- 



ment Station. The Treasurer's Annual Report 
showed the assets of the College to be §302,795.12 
and the liabilities to be $1,548.59. The College re- 
ceived in 1892, $58,600.25 and paid out $56,544.90. 



TRUSTEE MEETING. 
At an adjourned trustee meetitig held January 26, 
a committee consisting of the President, E. W. 
Wood, Wm. Wheeler, F. H. Appleton, Wm. H. 
Bowker, Daniel Needham and C. A. Gleason was 
appointed to take charge of the matter of new build- 
ings on the college grounds. It is proposed to 
erect, west of the dormitories, a new barn and a 
dairy house which is to be fitted up with all the 
modern appliances for dairying. It will contain a 
room large enough to be used as a class room, fully 
equipped with material for illustration. It is also 
proposed to move the old farm house from its pres- 
ent site to a position near the new buildings. The 
sura of $1750 was appropriated to complete the 
stone dam, and to enlarge the [tend. It was also 
resolved that illustrations of the various forms of 
road construction should be presented as object les- 
sons on the college grounds for the students and 
visitors. The present old chapel room, so long 
used for morning prayers and college gatherings, 
will be fitted up as a chemical laboratory for the 
use of advanced students. All religious exercises 
will be held in the new chapel and the new bell will 
be rung for college exercises. The college sewage 
that now empties in the ravine will be carried 
across on a trestle work and utilized by the farm 
department on the land on the north slope of the 
farm. Col. Needham reported that the legacy of 
T. O. H. P. Hurnham had been paid over to him, 
and thai it would be soon de[iosited with the treas- 
urer of the college. 



Shakbspeake's Idea of a College Course : — 
Freshinan year — "Comedy of Errors." 
Sopiomore year — "Mucli ado about Nothing. 
Junior year — "As you like it." 
Senior year — "All's well that Ends well." 



-Ex. 



"My sweetheart's the gay sophomore, 
He's the darling whom I most adore ; 
I was charmed with his looks, 
When first with his books, 
I saw his dear face at the door." 



-Ex. 



104 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE PANAMA SCANDAL. 

For many years the great European powers have 
lived on in a state of profound peace. Since the 
mighty throes of the Franco-Prussian war died 
away, leaving a German Empire and a French 
Democracy, an equipoise of the nations seems to 
have been established. Diplomat and anarchist, 
priest and soldier, prince and peasant ; all have 
passed leaving their places to others : but no social, 
political, or religious lever has yet been so weighted 
by the accumulating years as to hurl either of these 
sleeping powers against his neighbors. 

The latter French Republic after its test of twenty 
years is an established fact. Paris, impulsive and 
fickle as Athens, has won her rights with the life 
blood of her people, and dearly has she learned to 
prize them. She loves too her glory, and the mas- 
ter minds who compass it liave always a warm place 
in her breast. Such glory came to her from the 
great project of the Suez Canal, and such glory was 
to come from the glittering chimera of a canal at 
Panama ; but the Parisians have now onl3' obloquy 
for the gray-haired diplomat and financier, Ferdin- 
and De Lesseps, whose prince of genius gave suc- 
cess to the one ; but whose servility has wrecked the 
other and shaken the government which fostered it. 

Some four years ago, under the directorate of De 
Lesseps, Eiffel and others, and supported chiefly by 
the working classes of the French people, the Pan- 
ama Canal Co. came into being. Its colossal enter- 
prise was known over all the world. About two 
years since an expert in the employ of the French 
Government reported very unfavorably as to the 
chances of success for the Company. The report 
was partially suppressed. Since that time the major 
part of the unsuspecting stockholders' money has 
gone to the bribery of the authorilies. 

As the patriotic Frenchman converted his hard 
earned francs into Canal stocks, it was with un- 
bounded confidence in the national entegrity which 
could protect so enormous an enterprise. Judge 
his surprise and dismay ! The Cabinet treacherous, 
the Chamber bought, even the thiice honored names 
of Eiffel and DeLesseps disgraced at the prisoners' 
dock. 

France has steadily increased in wealth and mar- 
tial prosperity ; but the elements of destruction have 
kept evenly abreast. And this cry of perfidy has 



started them all into action ! As jackals round a 
wounded lion, each one, from anarchist to royalist, 
is scheming, intriguing, waiting for a fatal weak- 
ness to fall over the energies of France. 

Meantime America anxiously watches the drama. 
Since the days of Yorktown, a debt of gratitude 
which we might not repay in deeds, has grown and 
mellowed with the years, until to-day our prayer of 
earnest sympathy goes out to the sister Republic far 
off across the ocean. M. 



Y. M. G. A. TOPICS. 
Feb. 2. The Christian Riches. Rom. viii:l-17. 

H. P. Smead. 
Feb. 5. "And the Greatest of These is Love." 

I Cor. XIII : 1-13. E. A. White. 

Feb. 9. Christ's Example in respect to Prayer. 
Matt, xsvi: 37-44; John xvii : 20-21. 
E. E. Kinsman. 
Feb. 12. The Practical Nature of the Christian 
Religion. Col. iii : 1-15 ; Jas. i : 25, 27. 
E. A. Hawks. 



W. I. L. S. 

The meeting of Jan. 27 was quite well attended 
considering the average attendance the society has 
had the past two terms. Pres. Gifford called the 
meeting to order, and after the usual preliminaries 
the debate was taken up. The question of the 
evening was. Resolved : that the power of railroad 
corporations should be further limited by national 
legislation. F. H. Henderson, E. A. Hawks, and 
H. P. Smead spoke in the affirmative ; H. G. 
Stockwell, W. L. Pentecost, and R. A. Cooley, in 
tiie negative. The weight of argument was decided 
in the negative, the merits of the question in the 
affirmative. 

Now that prizes have been offered to be competed 
for by members of the Sophomore and Freshman 
classes, it seems as if the members of these classes 
should enter with especial interest into the debates. 
It is an honor to be the best debater of two lower 
classes, an honor well worth seeking. 

The W. I. L. S. is a literary society. Its work 
for the last two terms has been almost wholly that 
of debates, its aims have been to give the members 
practice in this kind of work, practice which they 
will be very thankful for later in their college course. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



loS 



Intercollegiate debates are becoming more and 
more popular with the college stndent and with the 
public. Yale and Harvard have interesting contests 
in this way, Amherst and Williams are trying to ar- 
range for public debates, and it has been suggested 
that M. A. C. and kindred institutions strive for 
supremacy in this line. At any rate, sooner or later, 
the students at our college will feel the need of more 
training in this direction and the W. I. L. S. is cer- 
tainly the place for preliminary practice as well as 
a place for advanced work. 

The question for next Friday night is, — Resolved, 
that the principles set forth in Bellamy's "Looking 
Backward" are both practical and desirable." All 
are invited to attend the meetins; and take part. 



umna 



The M. A. C. Alumni C iuh of Mass. will tender 
a reception and supper to the P\\eulty of the College 
and the State Board of Agriculture at the Qoincy 
House, Boston, Wednesday evening, Feb. 1st. 
Supper at 6-30, followed by leception. 

The Western Alumni Association is to give the 
Sophomore and Junior Rhetorical Prizes next Com- 
mencement. 

The graduates of this college attending the Har- 
vard "Vet." School will be allowed one year if suc- 
cessful in passing the examinations. 

'71. — William P. Birnie of Springfield visited here 
last week. 

'72. — Jolm C. Cutter, of Worcester, has been 
seriously ill but is now convalescent. 

'80- — William Colvard Parker of the Boston Com- 
mon Council has been appointed on several com- 
mittees. 

'81. — Charles L. Flint has signified his intention 
of presenting a portrait of his father, at one time 
president of this institution, to the college reading 
room. 

'84. — Elisha O. Jones, Litchfield, Conn., has been 
called to superintend the Experiment Station Farm 
of New Jersey, located at New Brunswick. 

'89. — George E. Stone, ex-'86, has recently grad- 
uated from the University of Leipzig, Germany, re- 
ceiving the degree Ph. D., in the course of Physio- 
logical Botany. 



'91. — Willard W. Gay has accepted a position in 
the office of F. L. Olmstead & Co., Landscape Gar- 
deners, Brookline, Mass. 

'92. — George E. Taylor spent a few days here 
last week. 

'92. — Milton H. Williams is tutoring at the Har- 
vard Veterinary School. 



When the student comes back from his Xmas recess, 
Intendiug on studies to work with great stress, 
Then the bills, long unpaid, most frightfully press 
On his pocket book, then he is heard to say "Bless 
Me ! how can I pay them? I have It ! I guess 
I'll write home to father about the whole mess 
And say Y. M. C. A. dues have reached an excess." 



Man proposes, but God disposes, the old proverb used to 
say, 

But times have changed and we must make the proverb 
suit the day ; 

'Tis true God used to choose the path which fixed poor 
man's condition, 

But now 'tis woman's right t'receive or reject the propo- 
sition. 



s 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



lOS MAIN STREET, - NOItTMAMPTON, MASS. 



io5 



AGGIE LIFE. 



EXCHANGE NOTES. 

A uew book of Columbia sougs bas been issued. 

Smitli college is tliinking of publishing a monthly. 

Cornell University celebrates its twenty-fifth an- 
niversary next year. 

Williams will hold its centennial exercises Oct. 
8th, 9th and 10th, 1893. 

Tliere are 3000 students at Berlin University of 
which 800 are Americans. 

Of the 322 members of the House of Representa- 
tives 106 are college graduates. 

At Cornell forty-five students have entered the 
short winter course iu Agriculture. 

A collection of 800 coins has been presented to 
Amherst, to aid in the Gieek department. 

The Amherst Summer School will have no ses- 
sion nest summer on account of the World's Fair. 

Osgood, half back of last year's Cornell team is 
the amateur middle weight champion iu wrestling. 

It is the proud assertion of Vassar graduates 
that no Vassar girl has ever been divorced from her 
husband. 

The Uniicrsity of Chicago weekly is called a tri- 
weekly, because it comes out ou lime one week and 
tries to the next. 

Each male student of the Chicago University is 
required to spend 3C minutes three times a week 
playing foot-ball. 

The Yale faculty have prohibited the B'reshmen 
from engaging in any intercollegiate base-ball dur- 
ing the next year. 

The Wellesley Shakespearian Society will build a 
club house after the model of Shakespeare's house 
at Stratford-on-Avon. 

The Pres. of Leland Stanford Jr. Univ., David 
Jordan, worked his way through Cornell Univ., and 
now gits $1.^,000 salary. 

Advice to Freshmen : — Honor thy professor in 
the days of thy youth, that thou mayst be solid be- 
fore thy Senior year. — Ex. 

The initials U. C. may refer to any one of three 
universities, University of Calilornia, University of 
Chicago and University of Colorado. 

The University of Pennsylvania will exhibit at 
the World's Fair a stone recording the oldest writ- 
ing iu the world, the date being 3800 B. C. 



The Kansas State Univ.'s last senior class had the 
following idiotic yell : 

"Johnny took a bite, Susie took a chew : 
Kock chalk, jay hawk, class of '92." 

A recent action of the Chicago University faculty 
in selling the college calendar to students, containing 
announcements which are necessary in taking the 
courses, has met great disapproval. 



They sat in the hammock at twilight, 
And the old folks thought they behaved. 

But I, being near, heard her whisper 
"Oh, Jack! you ought to be shaved !" 



—Ex. 



SWIFT DOUBLE ACTION REVOLVER. 



.5-sliot 38 calibre 

using 38 S. and W.'„ 

C. F. cartridges 

Ths Bointy, Matsrisl and 

Workmaaship; Unequalled. 

The Moat Improved Double 

Action Revolver in the Market. 

Price SIO, by mail, postpaid. 




THE BOSTON BULL DOG REVOLVER $3.25. 
THE CHAMPION SHOT GUN ONLY S12.00. 

FOR SALE BT 

L C. GREENE, 

BOX 386, - - - AMHERST, MASS. 

All correspondence will receive prompt attention. 



STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 



NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONEEY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 
FIRST CLASS GOODS. PRICES lOW. 

13 SOUTH colleioe:. 
AMHERST COLLEGE 



and Carpet RenovaliiiE Establislimeiit, 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE ; 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



107 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 



" Lamps and Lip Ooods are Ours." 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, A3IHEBST, UTASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED ^ SALE STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TEAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

A-MBEJtST, MASS. 



J. 



DEALER IN 



WflTGIiES, CLOCP, JEW EIiRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 



REPA5R1!\I3 ?JEATLY A^3 ROMPTLY DOf^E. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



fiO. P 



li 



h 




.A.3VLX3:EI?,S T , 



isd:-A.ss. 



MY CONSTITUTION. 

Name, immaterial: object, fun; 

Officers, numerous; membersliip, one; 

Meetings, continuous ; 

Voting, unanimous ; 

Treasury, emptiness — thus doth it run. 

— The Syracusian. 



Lives of college dudes remind us, 
That the ones who look sublime 

Are the ones who limp behind us, 
Aged by sulphur soap and lime. 

Let us then get up and hustle 
Drive cosmetics from the land. 

Like the high hat and the bustle, 
Crush them with an iron hand. 



-Purdue. 



On Sunday morning he wore a simple knot, 
Because his shirt had neither crease nor spot; 
On Monday morn he donned a four-in-hand, 
For reasons you will shortly understand; 
Wednesday morning he wore a monstrous puff, 
For reasons we may fancy good enough ; 
Thereafter in a sweater he was clad, 
For he had just one shirt per week — how sad! — Ex. 



NOTICES. 

Mails leave the college for the post-offlce at 1 p. M. and 
7-40 P. M. on week days. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Springfield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 p. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massa^ 
chusetts, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4 00, 6-45 p. m. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-46 a. 
M. 4-00, 6 45 p. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 45, 8-30 p. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. M. 

The President will be at liis office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurer will be at his offloe from 3 to 5 
p. M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the term. 

The Museum of Natural History will be open to 
visitors ou IMondays, Tuesd.ays, Wednesdays, and 
Fridaj s from 2 45 to 8-45 p. m. 

The college library will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m. and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 



io8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes i Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Sheet M^iasic, 



Music Books, 



Strings 

FOR the: violin, banjo, guitar, 



CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



.A.IvIEaE:K,ST. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 

,g^ DEN TISTS, ^g, 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTmGTON, D. D. S. 

cutijES's nz,ocK, amhekst, mass. 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PBYSICIANb' PBESCRII'TXOIfS CAMEWVI^I^T 
COMfO UNDED, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your ©OAS here. 



1^. u^. O. ST'CriDElSTT'S 

WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUAETERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



\j 



AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
e -A.. 3Vi:. TO 5 1=". JVC. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 



Jeweler, 



ician. 



Watchmaker. 



FINE GOODS! LOW TRICES! 

GOOD WORK WAILRAHTED! 

First Door from Post-offlce. 



For Biaits and Fall Overcsats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 

FINE ITAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, .$3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, $2.50 AND $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscnit go to 

O. 6. COlJCli & SOM'S. 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pa rise au, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 
EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Coolers JBlocIc, Amherst, Mass, 



-L-L Vy 



[h 



H 



FRESH 



m FIME. 



"1 
J 



n 



Amherst House Block, 



\\mi I 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, JFASS. 

Pure Dmos and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET AETICLKS, IMPOETED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIxVR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Sijringileld Rifles. 

Sundaj' and iiiglit calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 



©! 



1892. 



THE FHQTDO-HJiFHBR. 



NEW SKY UIQH-r. 
EINLARGEID OPERATING ROOM. 



CLASS AND SOCIETY GKOUPS'A SPECIALTY. 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



^. g. DI(?HI(^gO(N[, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 ,v. ll., 1-30 to 5 P. M. 



5^=»EtUer and Nitroii.s Oxide Gas administered -when 
desired. 



A.T rriaE 



AMHEiRST GASH SHOE STORE 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



A. GLYN 



4 t a I l r. ^ 



Repairing Neatly Doii-e. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING' 
GOODS. 



IVIilitapy Suits and Trimmings. 



assachusetts Aaricultural Colleae, j 




jSjLmlxersst, ]M;a.ss. 



<^ /V. cC 



^-T-^i^cc^^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AMHERBT, MASS., FEB. 15, 1693. 



yoL. III. itq. id. 



*DR'IMJFERS,» 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURy^L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FKUIT AND "OKNAMENTAL TREES AKD SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plauts, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS. 



THE MHERST 




}m CAR 



D 



W 



C. H. SANDERSON & CO,, 

CASH DEALERS IN 

FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods, 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



k 



CASH DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS, 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOE EVERYBODY. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, FlJiLOWS^. STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 



WINDOW SHADES. DRAPERIES, 



CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC 



All Goods STUICTLT CASH and at 
XiOWEST ri-LICSS. 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

I^XJBBEES 0-003DS. 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



K.EF.A.IElI3SrCa- I303SJ-E I'R.OIVtE'TIj'a-. 



T. W. SLOAN, 

3 I'HfENIX ROW. 



Eraetkal Blomber 



STEAA^ AND GAS riTTER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Meatiuff a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., FEBRUARY 15, 1893. 



No. 10 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mall matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS : 

G. F. CURLET, 'U3, Editor-in-Chlet, 

J. E. PERRY, '93, Business Manager, 

E. C. HOWARD, '93, P. S. HOYT, '93, 

A. E. MELENDT, '93. C. F. WALKER, '94, 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. P. KEITH, '94, 

T. P. FOLEY, '95. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



t\*?VATt^ V W0^\>\1\i^t. ?^\m^?.%. 



sTors^is. 



There has been a marked increase during the 
last few weeks in the number of contribitions sub- 
mitted for pulilicatiou in the Life. We are pleased 
to notice the interest taken in the competition for 
positions on the next board of editors, and hope 
that many who have not heretofore entered the con- 
test will do so at once. Both the quality and quan- 
tity of the work submitted will be taken into con- 
sideration. Although space will not permit us to 
publish every piece handed in, it should be remem- 
bered that every carefully |)repared article will 
count in favor of the writer, whether it is printed or 
not. 



The new cases being constructed in the Bluseum 
of Natural History are what may really be termed 
necessities. As the specimens in this museum have 
continually increased from year to year the older 
ones have been gradually crowded from the front of 
the shelves and either pushed back so far as to ren- 
der the names upon the cards and even some of the 
smaller specimens indistinguishable, or else they 



have been removed to other shelves and are almost 
inaccessible. Also the specimens recently added 
have remained without any covering and the accu- 
mulating dust, which it is impossible to entirely re- 
move, will in a short time prove injurious to them. 
We have already spoken of the need of a new build- 
ing in which the several collections scattered pro- 
miscuously about the different so-called museums 
may be united and form one large collection but as 
this does not appear to be immediately foi'th-com- 
ing the present plan of carefully preserviug the 
specimens is commendable. 



Some time ago Pres. Goodell, by special effort, 
obtained for the studeuts the privilege of receiving 
bulletins and reports from the Department of Agri- 
culture at Washington. Quite a number of the 
students availed themselves of this privilege and 
have received much valuable reading matter as a 
result. As the work of the Agricultural Department 
includes experiments and investigatious in nearly 
all the sciences taught in this institution, every 
student can And much of interest in some of the 
reports issued. A few minutes work in writing a 
card to the authorities will be sufficient to have one's 
name put on the mailing list in any department, and 
the bulletins asked for will be forwarded as they 
are issued. In this connection it might be well to 
call attention to the vast amount of literature that 
is continually being published by our different Ex- 
periment Stations over the country, nearly all of 
which can be had for the asking. A thorough 
reader of these publications will keep himself well 
abreast of the times in the different departments in 
which he is interested. 



The announcement that the trustees had decided 
to turn the old chapel room into a chemical labora- 
tory for the use of advanced studeuts, was received 
with favor by the college as a whole. It has long 



no 



AGGIE LIFE. 



been evident that the space heretofore allotted to 
the chemical department was insuflficient, while the 
increased work made necessary by the new course 
of study makes it absolutely necessary' to have 
better accommodations. However, a question im- 
mediately confronts us which demands an answer. 
How can a room be provided for the numerous col- 
lege gatherings? For years it has been the custom 
to hold meetings of the classes, the literary soci- 
eties, and other college organizations in the old 
chapel. The room has also been used for exercises 
in declamation, and for rehearsals of the orchestra 
and band. If it is really the intention of the 
authorities to turn the old chapel over to the use of 
the chemical department, and to have all religious 
exercises in the new chapel, it is evident that some 
room must be provided for general college gather- 
ings. How this can be done we will not attempt 
to say, but we trust that in the work of improve- 
ment so soon to be begun, this matter will not be 
forgotten. 



That vrell known saying, "Position is every- 
thing," might be fully applied to the position one 
must take in order to read any of the papers or 
magazmes iu the reading-room. To be sure we 
have the choice of two positions, sitting and stand- 
ing, but certainly the standing is preferable. If we 
sit, it must be upon a high stool with our feet clear 
of the floor, and then bend almost double over the 
sloping tables upon which the papers are fastened. 
That this position is unhealthy, any physician will 
testify ; that it is uncomfortable all Aggie students 
know. Why cannot some plan be adopted so that 
one may sit in an easy and comfortable position 
while reading? The papers would certainly be used 
more if they were so placed that the pains and aches 
at present iucurred in the reading of them, would 
be avoided. The principal objections to the use of 
tallies and comfortable chairs is that the papers 
would be •'borrowed" by some of the students, but 
the primary object of the Association has not been 
accomplished if the papers are not read by the stu- 
dent body as a whole. Then again the appearance ; 
the room looks uncomfortable to begin with and the 
impression made upon visitors is far from favor- 
able. This consideration is however of minor im- 
portance compared with the personal comfort of the 
students. 



^on"tribu"ted. 



THE ALUMNI CLUB REUNION. 

Wednesday evening, February 1st, the Alumni 
Club of Boston and vicinity held its annual reunion 
at the Quincy House, Boston. This was one of the 
most notable events in the annals of the club, as in 
addition to the usual program, a reception was 
tendered the Faculty of the College and the State 
Board of Agriculture, which proved a most pleasing 
and appropriate feature. The reception lasted from 
6.30 to 7.30 p. M., when the company repaired to 
the banquet hall, where an elaborate repast was 
served. Much chatting was indulged in, and the 
oldest alumni, made boys again on that night were 
foremost with their yarns concerning college days. 
Meanwhile the Everett Banjo, Guitar and Mandolin 
Club made the informal occasion still more enjoya- 
ble by their rendition of airs both lively and grave. 

Amoug the specially invited guests present were 
Hon William Olin, .Secretary of the Commonwealth, 
Hon. William R. Sessions, Secretary of the Board 
of Agriculture, E. W. Wood, Chairman of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Board of Agriculture. 
There were present in all, thirty-three members of 
the Board of Agriculture, and Overseers of the College. 
Also in the gathering were numbered Wm. H. 
Bowker, '71, of Boston, H. J. Wheeler, '83, Ph. D. 
of Kingston, R. I., Prof. Wm. P. Brooks, '75, Prof. 
.1. B. Paige, '82, D. V. S., Prof. C. O. Flagg, '72, 
President R. I. Agricultural College, C. L. Flint, 
'81, of Boston, Austin Peters, '81, M. R. C. V. S. 
of Boston, J. C. Cutter, '72, M. D., of Worcester, 
J. B. Lindsey, '83, Ph. D., of Amherst, E. R. 
Flint, '87, Ph. D.. of Boston, E. W. Dwight, M. 
D., Boston City Hospital, J. F. Winchester, '75, 
D. V. S., of Lawrence, F. A. Davis, '87, M. D., of 
Boston, and many others of our notable alumni, 
whose names, unfortunately, space will not allow us 
to publish. 

W. C. Parker, '80, LL. B. of the Common Coun- 
cil. President of the Alumni Club, presided at the 
supper and subsequent addresses, and in the open- 
ing speaking extended a warm welcome to the 
Board of Agriculture and the faculty. He alluded 
to the changes that have taken place in the college 
since he was a student, saying: "There is noth- 
ing that gives me greater pleasure than to compare 
the M. A. C. of 1879 and '80 with what it is to-day. 
At that time it was looked upon as the meanest 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Ill 



institution in the state. All stump orators took 
great delight in ridiculing it. It was a question 
whether we would be absorbed by Amherst, or 
taken up by Harvard, or abandoned altogether by 
the state. But through all those dark days our 
noble president was steadfast. 'Keep to your 
books and never mind what the papers say,' was the 
advice given us by President Stockbridge, and the 
splendid standing of the college to-day bears out 
the great value of that advice. The college ranks 
to-day second to none." 

Hon. Wm. M. Olin w:is then introduced. He 
made a short speech and succeeded pretty well in 
keeping the company in a roar of laughter. In 
speaking in his capacity as Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth, Mr. Olin assumed a more serious man- 
ner. It was his opinion that Massachusetts can look 
for good sound commonsense in no better place than 
its agricultural college, as also for its brain, good 
brawn and hardy muscle. Nowhere can be found a 
better class of citizens than in the farming cla«s. 

Mr. F. H. Fowler, '87, clerk of the Alumni Club 
read letters of regret from His Excellency, Governor 
Wm. E. Russell, Lieut.-Gov. VVolcott, Es-Gov. J. 
Q. A. Brackett, President H. H. Goodell, Prof N. 
S. Shaler of Harvard, Prof. G. F. Mills. Dr. C. S. 
Walker, Mr. £. Hersey of Hingham, and Mr. E. A. 
Thompson of Worcester. 

Our good friend, Secretary Wm. R. Sessions of 
the State Board of Agriculture, then spoke of the 
college and its work, praised its purposes and its 
aim. He said : 

"Students are at the Agricultural college for a 
purpose. This is distinctly different from many 
students in other colleges. I have adopted two M. 
A. C. men in my oflBee and I wish I could adopt 

them all. 

"I hope the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
will continue in the good path trodden so long by it, 
that its membership may be doubled, its usefulness 
trebled, and that we will always be as proud of it 

as we are to-day." 

Wm. H. Bowker, '71, of Boston was the next 

speaker. The college, he said, never was so 
healthy as it is to-day in funds', friends and enthus- 
iasm. Its income is not far from $60,000 a year. 
He denied the statement that the college was estab- 
lished lor farmers' sons. It was for the sons of the 
citizens of Massachusetts. 



Prof. Levi Stockbridge next took the floor amid 
great applause. The popularity of the congenial 
professor was demonstrated in a rousing manner. 
Among other things, he said : 

"I presided at the birth of your alma mater, I as- 
sisted her in her swaddling clothes, and I tried to 
erect her aright — and I did the same for most of 
you ; but I begin to feel almost as a stranger here. 

"The year 1879 has been referred to here. The 
secret of those troublesome times is not known to ex- 
cept a few, and it probably never will be known to 
many what the secret spring of all the opposition 
was. I am loyal to the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College idea as it was originally conceived. It was 
established to benefit farmers. 

"Benjamin Butler is dead, but he still lives in 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, and is respon- 
sible for what it is to-day. Butler was elected gov- 
ernor in 1883, and that year sent a special message 
to the Legislature in regard to the college. 

"He presented the object of the college in its 
true light, with no flattery, but just as it was. When 
the time came to pass the appropriation for it there 
was not a dissenting voice. Every Republican was. 
afraid to oppose it for fear that Butler would have 
the credit of doing a good thing. We had good 
sense enough not to ask for more money than we 
actually needed. The tide then turned and ever 
since it has kept true and strong. The public sen- 
timent of the Commonwealth is exactly where it 
should be. Keep true to your alma mater. Be per- 
fecily loyal to the idea of the men who founded the 
college." 

Prof. Wm. P. Brooks said a few words on the 
new course which is soon to go into effect. He also 
spoke somewhat at length on other improvements 
which htive been made in the college. He then 
touched on athletics and the new athletic fleld 
project. 

Prof. C. O. Flagg, '72, of the R. I. Agricultural 
College gave an interesjtiug account of the real be- 
ginning of Agricultural education in Rhode Island 
and of the work they are now doing at their college 
of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 

Dr. John C. Cutter, 72, related some very humor- 
ous college stories and thus gave his audience to 
understand that college men in his day were up to 
the same pranks we hear of now in connection with 
students. He also said : "Aggie journalism began 



112 



AGGIE LIFE. 



while I was in college. We had the use of three 
columus in the Amhersl Record, and had an edito- 
rial board of five members, three from '71, and two 
from '72. But the editors had most of the work to 
do so the scheme was not long continued." 

Interesting speeches were also made by Charles 
A. Mills, chairmiin of the examining board of over- 
seers, and others, after which college songs were 
indulged in, and gradually the gathering was dis. 
persed. 

The Reunion of 1893 was a very successful one. 
It accomplished its objef;t, but it is to be hoped 
that next year the event will attract more of the 
alumni, not particularly of the older or of the 
younger classes, but all that are in easy range of 
Boston. It cannot but be conceded that no small 
amtniut of good is to be derived from reunions of 
this nature as by associating witli our superiors we 
are greatly benefited. 



BISHOP PHILLIPS BROOKS. 

In the death of Bishop Brooks, the young men of 
America have met with a great loss. His greatest 
work has been among them. He won their love 
and respect, though never through flattering. 
Bishop Brooks was an earnest ardent worker and 
every moment of his time was occupied. Although 
always occupied he never refused callers and found a 
kind word for every one. He graduated from Har- 
vard with the class of 1855, and since graduation, 
he has spent many hours a day with the young men 
of his almamater, such was his loyalty to his college 
and his love to its students. 

A short time before his graduation, he called on 
the president of the college for the purpose of con- 
sidering his fuiure profession. The wise president 
told him that it would be well to pick out first those 
professions for which he was not fitted. "For in- 
stance," said the President, "you never can become 
a preacher owing to the impediment in your speech." 
America has rejoiced that this advice was not taken. 
It was through an effort to overcome this impedi- 
ment that Bishop Brooks acquired such a rapid ut- 
terance. A thirty minute sermon preached at 
Westminster Abbey, averaged two hundred and 
thirteen words per minute. Thus it was by persist- 
ent work and a wonderful effort that Phillips Brooks 
overcame the impediment and became one of the 



greatest pulpit orators that ever lived. Of his style 
Dr. George Gordon says, "So unlike all the great 
oratory of recent times, so new and striking in its 
type, achieving its purpose by its native force, its 
utter genuineness, and the magnificent rush of its 
movement; for after all. the thing that drew all 
hearts to Phillips Brooks was the uniqueness of the 
man, his wonderful simplicity and sincerity, his 
great unconsciousness, his massive goodness of 
heart, his towering humauity, above all his single- 
minded and sublime devotion to the kingdom of 
Christ." We as college men can get much good by 
studying such a life. His ou'n untiring efforts and 
his lofty motives with the love he had for young 
men compelled liim to encourage and to entreat the 
students of the colleges to make the most of their 
opportunities and to appreciate more highly the 
great privileges which they are enjoying. 

S.F. H. 



THE HAWAIIAN SITUATION. 

The first missionaries to the Hawaiian Islands 
were sent from Boston in the early part of the pres- 
ent century. Since that time the United States has 
sustained friendly relations towards these nearest 
neighbors of ours in the Pacific, there having always 
existed common interests between their inhabitants 
and our own people. 

During the first quarter of the century, under 
Kamehameha I, a man of remarkable zeal and intel- 
ligence, ships were built according to a model left 
by an early European explorer and commerce among 
the islands was started. His successors have all 
lacked his persevering energy and so the progress of 
the islands has been seriously retarded. The popu- 
lation is a mixture of several races. The natives, 
who constitute about one-half the entire number, 
are of medium height with dark features. They are 
inclined towards higher education and English is 
taught in some of their schools. The Chinese and 
Japanese are the most numerous of the foreigners 
and have been brought to the islands chiefly as con- 
tract laborers. The Americans rank next in num- 
ber and it is by them and the Europeans that the 
trade of the country is carried on. 

The kings have from time to time been compelled 
to grant privileges to these foreigners. Though 
these were really benefiting the natives, they have 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"3 



always considered them as eiicroachuoents on their 
rights and fiually tlie queen, since deposed, was 
compelled to recommend the adoption of anew con- 
stitution which practically amounted to the reestab- 
lishment of absolutism. At a meeting of the Cab- 
inet held a short time ago at HonoUiln, the members 
refused to ratify her ideas. Immediately a threat- 
ening crowd collected before the palace and the 
ministers were obliged to seek the government 
buildings for safety. Pleasures were at once taken 
to prevent the change of government. The foreign 
element of the community held a mass meeting at 
which the measures of the queen were condemned 
and a Committee of Safety consisting of thirteen 
members was organized. Finally a Provisional 
Government was agreed upon and an executive 
council of four prominent citizens was chosen with 
a graduate of Williams College as President. The 
danger to the property of foreigners of all nation- 
alities was deemed sufficient cause to warrant the 
landing of troops from the United States cruiser 
" Boston," and a temporary protectorate under the 
American flag has been sanctioned by the minister 
representing the United States. In the midst 
of this unsettled state of affnirs the long thought of 
annexation to the United States culminated in the 
despatch of envoys to our country with the purpose 
of making arrangements for this union. The ques- 
tion now naturally arises as to the advisability of 
annexation. There are two main standpoints from 
which we may consider this important problem. 

Regarding the commercial advantages of this 
union, little would be gained, for the treaty of reci- 
procity with the United Slates affords every oppor- 
tunity for trade. On the other hand it is claimed 
by some that our sugar industries would suffer but 
this is hardly true because these islands now pro- 
duce all that IS possible of this product. The soil 
being of volcanic formation contains more than the 
usual per cent, of saltpeter and a superior quality 
of tobacco can be grown. This and many fruits 
which only flourish in a mild climate have not been 
thoroughly tried as yet but it is asserted that they 
can be successfully raised. 

Regarded from the naval standpoint the principal 
objection to direct annexation is the uncertain atti- 
tude of European countries. In favor of union, this 
group of islands occupies the most important posi- 



tioji in the North Pacific. The rapid growth of our 
western states indicates that the commerce on the 
Pacific coast is destined to reach large dimensions. 
Therefore with intercourse among the many islands 
of this ocean it seems proper that we should have a 
coaling station for our war-vessels as other nations 
have. The necessity of this was particularly empha- 
sized when the Charleston was pursuing Itata in the 
recent trouble with Chili. The coal became low 
and more could be purchased only at an exhorbitant 
price. By a treaty made in 1884 the United States 
has the exclusive right of entrance to Pearl Harbor. 
No movement has yet been made to secure a per- 
manent site although it has been already suggested 
by President Harrison. 

While many advocate direct annexation, a pro- 
tectorate has been proposed. However, as it is 
understood that the commissioners will not accept 
anything short of direct annexation, this form of 
control is out of the question. If these islands are 
annexed, they will either become a territory or some 
provision will be made by which the ballot will be 
placed in the hands of only those who are capable 
of intelligently using it. 

The importance of this subject cannot be appreci- 
ated at a single glance for it involves many weighty 
questions and the whole country is justified in giv- 
ing it much thought. Every patriotic citizen should 
give the matter his attention and if possible his aid 
to the solution of this problem which effects to so 
great a degree the prosperity of our country. 

F. L. G. 



Senator Proctor of Vermont expects to soon in- 
troduce into the senate a bill looking to the founda- 
tion of a great national university in Washington. 



One of our exchanges makes the startling state- 
ment among other items of interest, that Grover 
Cleveland has been elected president of the United 
States. 



Foot ball captains next year : Yale, Hinkey ; 
Harvard, Waters ; Princeton, Trenchard ; Amherst, 
Haskell; Boston Tech., Thomas; University of 
Penn., Mackey ; Williams, Ide. 



114 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^ollc^f ^o-tfs- 



— The measles are still with us. 
— Burrington, '96, is a victim of the measles. 
— Unexcused absences this term are few and far 
between. 

— The orchestra played at Co. K's ball, Friday, 
Feb. 10th. 

— The first of the junior orations were delivered 
last Friday. 

— Edwards, '96, and Smith, '94, are sick with 
the measles. 

— The time for mid-term exams, has again made 
its approach. 

— Hemeuway, '9.5, has something excellent in the 
line of fountain pens. 

— Barker, '94, was obliged to go home last week 
on account of measles. 

— Kirklaud, '94, is detained from college exercises 
on account of sickness. 

— An unusually large squad appeared for extra 
drill last Saturday forenoon. 

— Foley, '95, has returned to college after an 
absence caused by sickness. 

— S. F. Howard, '94, made a short visit at his 
home at Wilbraham last week. 

— Pomeroy, '94, and Pntuam, '94, sre at their 
homes suffering from the measles. 

— F. H. Read, '96, has been entertaining G. F. 
Wetherbee of Weslayan Academy. 

— That excellent periodical. Public Opinion, now 
appears on file at the reading room. 

— The repairs on the steam-heating apparatus at 
the Drill Hall have been completed. 

— Several of the students have secured type- 
writers for use in their college work. 

— Until further notice the museum of Natural 
History will not be open to visitors. 

— The orchestra furnished music at a dance held 
in the Town Hall, Hadlej', last night. 

— The Seniors have petitioned the faculty for 
some electives in their course next t^rm. 

— There was no Saturday morning inspection on 
Feb. 4th, Lieut. Dickinson being out of town. 



— The .Seniors are at present studying Pharma- 
cology in connection with Veterinary lectures. 

— Quite a large representation from the college 
turned out to hear the Glee Club at North Amherst. 

— The new rules concerning composition exercises 
in the English department are having a decided effect. 

— Photographer Lovell has secured, daring the 
past week, several fine views of the college buildings. 

— A picture of last season's base-ball team, the 
gift of 1!. E. Crane. '92, now hangs in the library. 

--Dr. Walker exchanged with Rev. F. L. Good- 
speed of the First Congregational Church, Sunday, 
Feb. 5. 

— H. G. Stockwell, '94, has been obliged to spend 
a few days at home, recuperating from a severe 
sickness. 

— Among the recent additions to the gymnasium 
outfit are a flue set of new dumb-bells and one of 
Howe's scales. 

— Prof. P'ernald was absent from college a portion 
of last week attending to his duties in the eastern 
part of the state. 

— Tiie reading room tax for the winter term is 
75 cents, which is now due. There will be no tax 
for the spring term. 

— The orchestra furnished music at the drama 
"Shamrock and Rose" given by the Dramatic Club 
last Monday evening. 

— The cases in the museum are being increased 
by a row at the west side and also a row through 
the center of the hall. 

— The Glee Club is to give a concert at South 
Deerfield next Friday evening, assisted by R. A. 
Cooley, '95, as reader. 

—A. E. Melendy, '93, S. L. Morse, '96, A. C. 
Cutter, '94, and F. P. Washburn, '96, are conval- 
escent from the measles. 

— Cold northwest winds and icy sidewalks are a 
sufficient indication that New England winters have 
lost none of their old time severity. 

— Thirteen of the Seniors took a sleigh ride to the 
Agricultural Institute, Jan. 31. On the way home 
they visited Henry's Stock farm in Sunderland and 
Dickinson's Horse farm in Hatfleld. They reported 
a general good time. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"5 



— Prof. Mills will require from each member of 
the Sophomore class an article for the college paper. 
It ia safe to say they will not all be printed. 

— The final examination of the Junior Class in 
qualitative blow-pipe analysis was held last Monday. 
The remainder of the term will be spent in wet 
analysis. 

— E. A. Harwood, of North Brookfield, has been 
elected as a member of the Examining Board of 
Overseers in place of W. A. Kilhurn, of South 
Lancaster. 

— A portrait of Charles L. Hint, president of 
this college during 1879 and 1880, has been pre- 
sented by his son and is at present in the library 
reading room. 

— Mr. W. Gr. Lutze, assistant secretary of the 
Young Men's Christian Association of Mass. and 
Rhode Island spoke before the Thursday evening 
meeting, Feb. 2Qd. 

— A number of the students from our college 
have secured positions in connection with the 
Woild's Fair, a certain line of work being received 
solely for college students. 

— It is rarely that sickness is a^* prevalent about 
college as it has been thus far this term. Occasion- 
ally half a class is absent, detained either by sick- 
ness, or the care of the invalids. 

— A large number of students attended the Am- 
herst Lecture Course entertainment last week. The 
Lillian Durell Opera Company presenting the Eng- 
lish opera "Mignon" was the attraction. 

— President Goodell is a member of the executive 
committee of the Association of Agricultural Col- 
leges and Experiment Stations and is also a member 
of a committee to collect intercollegiate statistics. 

— Wednesday evening, Feb. 8, the Glee Club 
gave a concert at North Amherst under the auspices 
of the Christian Endeavor Society. A large audi- 
ence greeted them and were apparently well satisfied 
with the evening's entertainment. 

— Last week the Boston and New York papers 
reported an account of an interview of a committee, 
with Pres. H. H. Goodell as chairman, with Presi- 
dent-elect Grover Cleveland. The committee were 
charged with the commission of recommending Hon. 
John E. Russell for a position in the new Cabinet 
as Secretary of Agriculture. 



— Interesting experiments in the mechanical 
analysis of soils are being carried on at the chemical 
laboratory. Apparatus purchased expressly for the 
work is being run night and day, power being fur- 
nished by a water motor. The samples of soil were 
collected from different parts of the state by the 
Hatch Experiment station and are to be exhibited 
at the World's Fair. 

— Dr. J. B. Lindsey gave an interesting talk be- 
fore the Natural History Society, Feb. 6, in which 
he ably discussed the question as to whether plants 
were able to take free nitrogen from the air. He 
gave a short history of the experiments affecting 
this question, which have been tried and by diagrams 
explained the manner in which leguminous plants 
through the action of bacilli were able to make use 
of free nitrogen. He illustrated his lecture by the use 
of dried tubercle-bearing legumes and microscopic 
specimens. 



GLEE CLUB CONCERT AT NORTH 
AMHERST. 

The concert given by the glee club, last Wednes- 
day evening, at the North Amherst Congregational 
Church proved the most successful one thus far this 
season. The rendering of several selections was 
superior to thai, of former concerts and the quartette 
was repeatedly encored. One noticeable departure 
was the manner in which the tenors were arranged 
but which seems admirably adapted to the present 
number now constituting the club. 

The students should have been more loyal in their 
support by sending a larger delegation to accompany 
the club as it is very seldom that we have the 
opportunity of hearing the concerts in places so con- 
venient of access as was this last entertainment. 



"Will yon drop into my mitten!" 

Said the fielder to the fly ; 
"No I thank you," said the spheroid, 

As he passed the fielder by. 

"My skin is very tender 

And your mittens hard and tough, 
And though I fear you may object, 

I thinli I'll use a muff." 

— Williams Weekly. 



ii6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



TEE NECESSITY OF ORGANIZATION 
AMONG FARMERS. 

To anyone, who has given the matter the least 
attention, it is very evident that the present condi- 
tion of our farmers is far from what it sliould be. 
From all sides comes the old cry that "farming 
does not pay," ami we are forced to believe this 
when we realize the number of abandoned farms in 
New England. Furthermore, there are not a few 
of us who know that many of the farms, which are 
not abandoned, are practically worthless ; they yield 
such small returns. The farmers themselves have , 
in many eases, reached such a condition of poverty 
and ignorance that their name has become a byword. 

To those of us who are interested in this matter, 
and all of us should be, this condition of affairs is 
cause for grave apprehensions. Agriculture is 
the most noble of all occupations ; "it was the first 
industry and it will be the last."' Our farmers are 
the backbone of the nation. Consequently the deg- 
radation of either is a menace to our national pros- 
perity, and our national strength. 

As we consider this most important subject, the 
questions why and how, at once present themselves. 
How may their condition be improved? It is the 
purpose of this article to partially answer these 
questions, and, if it may be pardoned, suggesting a 
method of improvement. 

Why, with our laud the most fertile, with 
mechanical ingenuity second to none, with both 
our general and state governments spending large 
sums yearly, for the promotion of agriculture, with 
our agricultural colleges sending out yearly their 
quota of educated young men to take up the work, 
why, under these favorable auspices, are not our 
farms valuable, and our farmers prosperous and 
intelligent? 

Agriculture is so broad in its scope that the causes 
which affect it, either way, are necessarily numer- 
ous, so numerous thut space and time will allow us 
to consider only the most important. 

Duriug the last fifty or sixty years the profes- 
sions, our growing manufacturing interests, and our 
growing cities have offered greater inducements to 
an enterprising young man than farming. In con- 
sequence of this our cities have been growing and 
flourishing at the expense of our farms. Able and 
ambitious young men have sought their fortunes 



elsewhere, leaving there duller and less aspiring 
brothers to plod along on the f:irm. Thus the brains 
and business managmeraent have, in a measure, 
been taken from farming and applied to other 
industries. 

Our farmers are also at a great disadvantage, in 
that they lack capital, without which in these times 
ihey can do nothing. They are weak, the manu- 
facturer powerful. If capital is power, so is knowl- 
edge ; and here also the farmers are lacking. 

But above all they lack concerted action, which is 
the keynote of all success. "In Union there is 
Strength" must iie the motto of the farmers, if they 
wish to succeed. "United, they stand; divided, 
they fall." This is an era of organization. Not 
only are our capitalists and our skilled laborers 
organized ; but our unskilled laborers are making 
gigantic strides in that direction. If the farmers 
are to continue in the race, they too must unite. 
The Grange and Farmers' Alliance are steps in this 
direction ; but neither of them fills the requirements. 
The Grange from its character can only be of local 
utility ; and the Alliance has championed too many 
wild and visionary principles to recommend itself to 
any intelligent person. What is wanted is an 
organization which shall he national in its scope and 
rational in its principles. An organization which 
will give our farmers such power and strength as 
will secure for them the respect and consideration 
which is accorded to the leaders of other industries. 
When the farmers have formed such an organiza- 
tion they will have discovered a panacea for their 
ills. First, by their numerical strength they will be 
able to exercise a controlling influence over our leg- 
islation. Second, by combining their capital they 
will lie able to command the attention of the busi- 
ness world, and to apply business principles to 
agriculture. 

Through the personal contact, which will be the 
result of such an organization, their minds will be 
broadened and their desire for knowledge stimulated. 
These combined effects will serve to bring farming 
up to that point where it will offer inducements to a 
young man of push and enterprise to choose it as 
his vocation. 

"Rome was not built in a day." Neither will 
this glorious end be attained at once. It will take 
time and labor. With the present generation of 



AGGIE LIFE. 



117 



farmers the work can go on but slowly; "for you 
cannot learn an old dog new tricks." But for us 
as young men who are going out to take their places 
there are great possibilities. It is for us to devote 
ourselves to this great work, and to carry it on as 
far as we can toward completion. It is for us to 
again raise agriculture to its place at the head of all 
industries, and to make the name farmer, not a 
subject for ridicule, but a title of dignity and 
respect. 

H. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

Indoor Meet, Saturday, Febroart 4, 1893. 

Running High Jamp. 

1st Vaughn, '9G. 2ini Jones, '95. 

3d Manley, '94. 

Traveling Rings. 

1st H. J. FowliM', '94. 2d L. H. Bacon, 

'94. 3d Ballou, '95. 

Indian Club Swinging. 

1st Howard, '93. 2ud Howard, '94. 

3d L. H Bacon, '94. 

Standing High Kick. 

1st Reed, '95. 2nd Vaughn, '96. 

3d Manley, '94. 
Points by classes : 

'94—14 '96—8 

'95— 9 '93—5 

Indoor Meet, Saturday February 11, 1893. 

Light Weight Boxing {wider ISO lbs.) 

1st Harper '96. 2nd Sullivan, '95. 

3d Tiuoco, '93. 

Flying Rings. 

1st Davis, '93. 2ud L. H. Bacon, '94. 

3d h. F. Howard, '94. 

Batule Board Jump. 

1st Curley, '96. 2nd Baker, '93. 

3d Hubbard, '96. 

Standing Hop, Step and Jump. 

1st Baker, '93. 2nd Morse, '94. 

3d Toole, '95. 
Points by classes : 

'93—14 . '94—7 

'96—11 '95—4 

Total points for four meets : 

'94—62 '96—22 

'93—39 '95—21 



The events for the next two weeks are as follows : 
Saturday, February 18. 
Parallel bars. 

Heavy weight boxing, (150 lbs. or over). 
Quarter mile walk. 
Wrestling. 

Saturday, February 25. 
Half-mile run. 
Three standing jumps. 
Running hop, step and jump. 
Three legged race, (by classes). 
Per order, 
H. C. Davis, Pres., 
Lowell Manley, Sec.-Treas. 



We sat on the stair, 

There was j ust room for two ; 
We were not aware, 
As we sat on the stair, 
That mamma was there ; 

Right there in full view 
She sat ; — on the stare : 

There was just room for two. 



Ex. 



Schillare's 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIN STUBET, - SOUTHAMPTON, MASS. 



ii8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Sumir^D 



s. 



'81. — Charles L. Fliut is located at 15 Congress 
St., Boston, as a stockbroker. 

'82. — Everett .S. Chandler, a graduate of the 
Chicago Theological Seminary, whose address has 
been unknown since 1885, has assuuaed the pastor- 
ate of a Congregational Church in Harvey, Cook 
County, 111. 

'82. — Burton A. Kinney, formerly at 6 Fessendeu 
St., Deeriug, Me., is now employed as a traveling- 
salesman by the Lowell Novelty Wire Works. 

'82. — Joseph L. Windsor is now located in an in- 
surance office. La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

'87. — Joseph Martin, ex-'87, has changed his ad- 
dress from Marblehead to No. 7 Cypress St., Salem, 
Mass. 

'90. — Truman P. Feltou is at present engaged in 
farming at West Berlin, Mass. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES. 

Harvard employs 253 instructors, Columbia 220 
and Yale 153. 

Yale is to have a covered base ball ground, a gift 
from au alumnus. 

Lake Forest University has been absorbed by the 
Chicago University. 

Current Topics is the name given the new Chica- 
go University monthly. 

More than one-third of the students of Williams 
are from New York state. 

Boston University is to soon have a song book, 
the production of the class of '93. 

Smith Sophomores have petitioned the faculty for 
permission to publish a college paper. 

An exchange says that a tandem tricycle knocks 
this English mistletoe business sky high. 

Our motto : Unity plus loyalty plus activity to the 
nth power equals college spirit. — Campus. 

Princeton raised more money for religious pur- 
poses than any other college in the country. 

A young colored lady passed the best entrance 
examinations this year to enter Chicago University. 

Spain has 10 universities; Italy 17, Germany 21, 
Great Britian 11, Russia 8 and the United States 
350. 



H. D. HEMENWAY, 

DEALER IN 

Student Supplies, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, NOTE BOOKS, WHITE GLOVES, 

POCIOiT LENSES, STATIONERY, 

CHOICE CONFECTIONERY, 

FIGS, ETC. 

PRICES L.O\N.z 
21 NORTH COLLEGE. 



SWIFT DOUBLE ACTION REVOLVER, 



.5-shot 38 calibre ^-^.T iZZSM'J „ 
using 38 S. and W.^,"^' *.2?SW/ a 
C. F. cartridges. '"'■— -^".-i 
The Beauty, Material and 1(1? '\( 
Woriminshipl Unequallod. ^^'^ J 
The Moxt Improved Double 

Auction Mevolver in the Mai-ket 

PRICB $10, by MAII-, POSTPAID. 




THE BOSTON BUUL DOG REVOLVER $3 .25. 

THE CHAMPION SHOT GUN ONl-Y $12. OO. 

FOR SALE BY 

I. C. GREENE, 

BOX 386, - - - AWiHERST, MASS. 

All correspondence will receive prompt attention. 



STUDENTS' 



TPLIES. 



NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 
FIRST Cr.iSS GOODS. PRICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH COLLBGE. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 



and Carpel Heiiovatiiig Establislinieot, 

Aggie Agent, C. L BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



119 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 

BBaBperteFS for iliinfs Siilles. 



"L 



L 



m Ours." 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMBERST, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

UVERY, FEED ^] SALE STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMMERST, MASS. 



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FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

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FANCY GOODS, 

FINE STATIDHERY. 

REPAIRING NEATLY A^9 ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



"Y^ 



. P^ 



K 




J^aVtHEK-ST, 



ls^-A.SS. 



T. M. C. A. TOPICS. 

Feb. 16. — How Win our Country for Christ. (Mis- 
sionary Meeting.) Luke 14:16-24. 
Joseph Baker. 

Feb. 19. — Learning from our Mistakes. — Acts 26 : 
9-20. H. D. Hemenway. 

Feb. 23.— "Whatsover Ye Do." Matt. 10:42; 
I Cor 10:31. T. S. Bacon. 

Feb. 16. — The apparent Triumphs of the Wicked 
are Unsubstantial. Pa. 72 :l-20. Gal. 
6 :7, 8. C. L. Brown. 



The Brown Herald publishes each day notes from 
one of the twelve largest preparatory schools of 
New England. 



The oldest university in the world is said to be 
the University of Fez, the chief seat of Mahometan 
theology in the Western world. 



NOTICES. 

Malls leave the college for the post-office at 1 p. M. and 
7-10 P. M. on week days. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-46, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Springfield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 p. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massit- 
chusetts, 7-45, 10-45, A. M. 4 00, 6-45 p. M. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-46 a. 
M. 4-00, 6-45 P. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 46, 8-30 P. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. m. 

The President will be at his office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurer will be at bis office from 3 to 5 
p. M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the term. 

The Museum of Natural History will be open to 
visitors on JNIondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and 
Fridays from 2 45 to 3-45 p. m. 

The college library will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m. and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 



120 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes;! Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 

OP-^O-E'S SHOE STOIRE, 
■viriLiLi.A-:ivcs' block;. 



Slieet Music. 



jMusic Books. 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



,^^IvIHE]IlST . 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F 

AMHERST, MASS. 



.(^ DENTISTS. G).. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CUTZEB'S BLOCK, AMBEUST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
e A.. Iv^C. TO S -JP. Is/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 

E. R. BENNETT, 
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Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW FHICES! 

GOOD WORK WARE, ANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

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CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

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1^. .£^. a. sT-uriDEisrTS 

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Far Suits and Fall DvErcaats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 

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B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, §3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, §2.50 and $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O. G. COUCM Sc SON'S. 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseaij, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Ojfice, Cook's Blocic, Amherst^ Mass, 



-i- J- v_y 



H 



H 



^. g. DI(5HIC^gO(N[, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



FHEBH AWB. TIME. 



DEUEL'S DRU& STORE, 

Amherst House Block, - Amiierst 



MO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, . - AMHER,ST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting anil Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residen''.e, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 



1892. 



TH E__FE OTD EM.EFHSBl. 

NEW SKY LIGHT. 
:NLARGED OPEIRATING ROOM. 



CLASS AND SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY. 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



Office Hours, 9 to 13 a. jr., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



^g^Ethcr and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



y^T THE 



AMHERST GASH SHQE S¥9REi 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



/ 



TAILOR. -): 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



pilitapy Suits and Tficamings. 



assachusetts Aaricultural Colleae, 







\A J-^- fd^r^-^^^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



EMWEMST, MilSS., M.&IICH 1, ifigSi. 



¥0L. III. Md. il. 



*BR1MTERS,» 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of tlie college, and the 
pnblic generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, a,lso 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers aud Small Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS. 



THE MHERST 




>ND CARPET 



C. H. SMDERSOP CO,, 

CASH DEALERS IM 

FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S7INDEIIS0H k Thompson, 



CASH DEALERS IH 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVKRTBODT. 



STOR<I?J.. 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BED STEApS. MATT RESSES. P l^LLO WS, STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 



WINDOW SHADES ■_ gg A PERIES^ 

CARPETS, RUGS. ETC.. ETC. 

All : Goods STKICTLT CASH and at 
LOWEST FS.ICES. 

E. D. :ma.rsh[. 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



E.Br'A.iaiKra- rjojSTB I'K.oivcr'TL-Sir. 



T. W^. SL.OAN, 

3 PH(EX!X ROW. 



J • 



mm 






I 



SIEA/H ANi> CAS FSTIER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Ileatins a Specialty. 



AGGIE 




VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., MARCH 1, 1893. 



No. 11 



Publislied Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Aa:ricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Pest Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OJP EDITOnS : 

G. F. CURLET, '1)3, Editor-in-Chief, 

J. R. PEEKY, '93, Business Manager, 

E. C. HOWARD, '93, F. S. HOYT, '93, 

A. E. MELENDY, '93. C. F. WALKER, '94, 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. ICEITH, '94, 

T. P. FOLEY, '95. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



?,^Y.^tHTl^ ^ \.\^^\*tj\i5.t^ ?l\U-^t9.^. 



,di°t©raaLls. 



The intentional defncing of papers in the college 
reading room is a custom which does not and never 
will receive the support of any student possessing 
the least degree of common sense. Those members 
of the college, and they are few in number, who 
can find no better employment than destroying the 
property of others wi!l doubtless awaken to the folly 
of their actions in course of time. As long as the 
culprits are unknown to the reading room associa- 
tion, that body cannot be held respunsible for the 
damaged condition of some of the papers. 



We have an extensive and useful library at our 
disposal and one which, on certain subjects, is 
second to none iu the State. The general classifi- 
cation and disposal as well as the raathod of taking 
out books, is, as has been observed before in these 
columns, one of the best that could be devised. 
The accommodating spirit of the management has 
lately been made manifest by tlie placing of a vol- 
ume in the reference room, for the use of the soph- 
omore class, so that it may be referred to and used 



at any time. It is understood that the same privi- 
lege will cheerfully be granted to any class desiring 
the same. This movement is characteristic of the 
progrsssive spirit of the President and should be 
appreciated by the student body. With the new 
books which are continually' being added, the 
library is constantly increasing in size and import- 
ance. 



References are frequently made in the newspa- 
pers, either directly or by innuendo to the lo'sv 
standard of college journalism. Doubtless these 
ciiticisms are to some extent merited, but consider- 
ing the limited time which the editorial staff of a 
college paper devotes to the editorial work, there is 
much in the literature of college newspapers which 
is very creditable. The critics do not seem to real- 
ize that a student is obliged on account of the 
many demands on his time, to devote but a short 
lime to the performance of his duties as editor, and 
consequently inaccuracies may more frequently be 
credited to haste rather than incompetencj'. But 
unquestionably there is still much room for improve, 
ment in college journalism and it is onl3' by con- 
stant attention to details on the part of contributors 
as well as editors that the best results can be 
obtained. 



The lack of interest manifested by the Class of 
'95 as to what members of that class shall serve as 
their representatives on the Life board during the 
coming year is something unusual and unparalleled 
in the history of the paper. Is it that the work of 
the editors is considered so arduous that there is 
hardly a man iu the class who is willing to try for 
the position ? Many when interviewed declared 
that they have no desire to compete or that they 
cannot write suitable articles. Is it possible that 
the literary standard of that class is so low that it 
cannot furnish three men who are able to offer con- 



122 



AGGIE LIFE. 



tributions? We are not iu a position to decide 
whether tliis be true or not but if a student wlio is 
in liis soplioniore year cannot, in liis own estima- 
tion, furnisli a written production worthy of pul)li- 
cation it is evident tliat tlie professor iu charge of 
the Englisli department has adopted a method that 
will enable the board to ascertain who it is that 
should be selected from the class. 



As the time draws near for the opening of the 
Columbian Exposition at Chicago the importance 
of the event to the colleges and universities of the 
country is becoming more and more realized. The 
exhibits to be made by these institutions and by the 
many college fraternities will bo very extensive and 
will illustrate in a striking manner the progress of 
education m the United States. The attendance 
of college students at the exposition will be very 
large. Every college and university in the land 
will be represented by a larger or smaller deli'g;i- 
tion. The benefit that might be derived from the 
gathering together of so large a body of college 
men cannot be underestimated. We are glad to be 
able to say that iu its relations to the exposition, 
the M. A. C. is by no meaus bi^hind its sister col- 
leges. Our exiiibit, prepared with the greatest of 
care, will not fail to show our rank among the Agri- 
cultural colleges of the country. This exhibit, too, 
will prove of great interest to the many western 
alumni and former students who will be at Chicago 
next summer. It only remains to establish a per- 
manent M. A. C. headquarters at the fair, where all 
undergraduates, alumni and members of the faculty 
may register, giving their city address and their 
period of staj' at Chicago, to secure the greatest 
benefit to the college. 



"The last term." The lower classmen read tlie 
expression and have but one interpretation for it. 
They feel how foolish tliey were to spend so much 
time in useless recreation and pastimes duiing '-the 
last term," and what an improvement it would have 
been if they had only been a little more careful 
about each day's woi-k. But to the Senior this ex- 
pression of three words has a deeper significance, 
and, when it has lost its meaning, tliat he will have 
severed his active connection with the college is in- 
deed a reality. It means more to him than he 



would at first be willing to admit, and to some it 
may mean more than ihey would at first hope to 
realize. The Senior has been with us for nearly 
four long years, and has learned to know the col- 
lege as a home, a play-ground, an Alma Mater. 
But after "the last term," which is so near at hand, 
he leaves it, perhaps forever, and begins his life's 
career and its many hard pioblems. He will find 
that it is harder t) ma^-ter the tribulations of life 
the older he gets and that there is not always a 
kind professor or classmate at his shoulder to show 
him his mistakes and set him on the right track. 
But he will realize more, from day to d.ay, what a 
boon to hiui a college education is, and how much 
of a start it has given him. To all the Seniors Thk 
Life wishes the best results for "the last term," 
which is so soon to become the past. 



The action of the Princeton faculty in allowing 
the students of that institution to take their exami- 
nations without supervision, has been fully com- 
mented on liy the daily and the college press. Thua 
I'ar it has worked successfully, and to us it seems 
to be the ideal method of conducting examinations. 
With the eye of the instructor constantly upon him, 
keeping such a close watch that he virtually s.ays 
"Crib if you can without my seeing you," there 
almost seems to be a premium put on this perni- 
cious practice, and the student who can successful- 
ly "shut the eye" of the officer iu charge of the ex- 
amination feels that he has done a deed of which he 
has no need to feel ashamed. Incorrect as this 
sentiment may be from a moral point of view, no 
one can deny that there is an element of reason in 
the view taken by the student. The Princeton 
faculty leave the man wholly to his sense of honor. 
He gives his pledge to neither receive aid or give 
il during the examination then in progress and 
afterwards gives his statement that he has conform- 
ed to his promise. In this way the faculty of 
Princeton is encouraging a high standard of honor 
among the students of that institution, and at the 
same time creating a public sentiment in favor of 
integrity and honest dealing. Could such a system 
be introduced into our own college, there is liitle 
doubt but that a custom which has obtained such a 
firm root in our own as well as in all the colleges of 
our land, would become a thing of the past. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



123 



Oi 



,r^Du 



" THE NECESSITY OF ORGANIZATION 
AMONG FARMERS." 

In "H's" articlfi in tbe last issue of tlie Life, 
under the above head, there are some points on which 
there seeoas to be a great diversity of opinion. 

Granting, "that the present condition of our 
farmers is far from what it should be," we still find 
that, as a class, they are vastly better off than any 
of the other laboring people. Never in our history 
could a farmer take so small an amount of his 
produce to market and return home with so much 
of what he is obliged to purchase as at present. A 
farmer wha has been in the business manj' years, 
says : "1 have never before known so good a year 
for farmers since I began farming, not even in war 
times," speaking in reference to the I'ast year. 
"Farming does not pay I " How many farmers are 
there who keep an accurate account of their busi- 
ness? Only a very small proportion of them. If 
thev did they would cease to speak of the farm not 
paying. Does not the farmer uct his living from 
his farm? And does he not live as well as liis 
brother in the city who has an equal amount of cap- 
ital? I say most emphatically that he does. And 
his living must be regarded as profit, as at the end 
of the year, when his set of books should be bal- 
anced, he still has his farm, stock and tools on hand 
and in most cases, some permanent im[)rovemeuts 
on the farm ; some addition to stock and tools, 
which must be regarded as increase in capital, there- 
fore gain. Besides this, he has had iiis living, 
which is a clear profit. 

This matter of abandoned farms, alrout which we 
hear so much, and out of which certain political 
parties have endeavored to make so much capital, 
seems to me to be only a natural result of the short- 
sighted policy of our ancestors, with no disres[)ect 
to them, in regard to the selection of farm locations. 
In the majority of cases in which farms have been 
abandoned we find that they are situated in inacces- 
sible places from railroads and towns, are rocky, 
sterile and suited only to the growth of the forests 
of whicli they never should have been denmled. 

"H" makes the assertion that "the farmers have 
jeached such a condition of poverty and ignorance 



that their name has become a by-word." and in the 
next few lines comes down with the astonishing 
declaration that "our farmers are the backbone of 
the nation." How does he reconcile those two state- 
ments when, later on he himself says that "Knowl- 
edge is power?" The fact is that, as a class, far- 
mers are the most intelligent and well informed on 
any of the leading questions of the day of any of the 
laboring people. Not only does the average farmer 
have Ills agricultural papers but his local newspaper, 
a city weekly, or two, and in many cases, his daily 
paper, thus being enabled to keep in touch with the 
rest of the world on all the vital questions of the day. 

"11" asks "Why are not our farms more valua- 
ble?" after practically stating several reasons why 
they should be. Let "H," or any other man, go 
out to buy a farm. If its owner does not ask all it 
is vrorth why, then he sliould purchase immediately. 
As a matlei' of fact, recently proven by statistics, 
farm values are steadily increasing. 

It is true that the professions and manufacturing 
industries and other pursuits have drawn heavily 
from the farm for their best men. This is as it 
should be to a certain extent. JNIany of the men 
who have left the farm have been those who did not 
like farming and its attendant hard work, preferring 
intellectual labor, or the skilled operation of machin- 
ery. Even so great a man as Daniel Webster is 
said to have been a little shirky when there was 
hard manual labor to be performed on the farm. 

Any man who is not a lover of Nature and who 
cannot find pleasure in the vario.is processes of farm 
life can never make a success of farming and should 
therefore choose some other occupation, as it is 
mainly from such men that most of this grumbling 
about the farmers' hard liie is heard. Furthermore, 
if all the men reared on farms always remained far- 
mers, there would be a louder cry of overproduction 
than at present and many who otherwise would make 
good lawyers, doctors, clergymen, or skilled work- 
men, would make indifferent farmers, doing nothing 
to improve agriculture, which is the point we are 
striving for. 

Harmonious organization extending through polit- 
ical and business matters and embracing all the far- 
mers in the country is something hardly to be ex- 
pected so diverse are the interests of the different 
sections and so conservative are the farmers in their 



124 



AGGIE LIFE. 



opinions. Wlial kind of an organization would it 
be tliat could embrace and satisfy all the farmers 
from Maine to California and from Texas to Minne- 
sota? Methinks it would be something wonderfully 
if not fearfully made. 

"H" says the Grange can be of only local utility. 
I beg to differ with him. The Grange not only has 
local organizations known as Subordinate Granges, 
but also Pomona Granges. State Granites and the 
National Grange. To this last is due almost the 
entire credit of securing the national legislation fav- 
orable to agricultural interests in the last decade. 

It was in no small degree due to the influence so 
powerfully exerted by the National Grange, work- 
ing through its agents in Washington, that the 
Hatch Bill was passed establishing the stations ; 
the bill increasing the fund of the agricultural col- 
leges ; the bill limiting and controllini: the manufac- 
ture and sale of bogus butters ; and the rates on 
agricultural commodities were raised in the McKin- 
ley Bill to a par with the protection afforded manu- 
factured articles. In Massacliusetts much good 
work has been done by the State Grange through 
its agent in Boston who remains there nearly all the 
time the Legislature is in session, looking out for 
the interests of the farmers. Much harmful legisla- 
tion has been prevented and much beneficial secured 
by tbe prompt attention of this agent in giving 
notice to all the Granges in the state whose mem- 
bers would straightway deluge the legislators with 
petitions and letters giving their reasons for or 
against the proposed measures. A.u instance of the 
influence of the Grange is seen in the support ac- 
corded this institution, it being the policy of the 
Grange to uphold anything that will educate the 
farmer, either directly or indirectly. 

At the present lime any legislation that is asked 
for by all the farmers in concert is granted, although 
they demand so little that it is almost lost sight of 
in the multitude of bills and resolutions enacted 
into laws favorable to other classes. 

"H" says that through personal contact resulting 
from such an organization as he proposes the far- 
mers' minds will be broadened and their desire for 
knowledge increased and stimulated. This is pre- 
cisely what the Grange has done and is doing whur- 
ever it exists and to the hundreds of thousands of 
farmers and their families who belong to the order 



it has been of incalculable value, not merely in an 
educational and social way but in the moral influ- 
ence exerted. 

What the farmers of the United States need to do 
is to support the Grange more strongly, form new 
ones where there are none, learn all they can from 
their connection with it, and then, acting through 
the existing political parties elect such men as will 
legislate only in their interests, voting for none who 
will not pledge themselves to support measures fav- 
orable to the agricultural classes. 

Let us as we go out into the world to take our 
places in the rank.? of the farmers, not try to multi- 
ply farmers' organizations, but give our best 
tiioughts and endeavors to those already in exist- 
ence worthy of our support, working for the ad- 
vancement and success of them and our fellowmen, 
and we shall reap the reward of an honored name, 
the kind regards of our neighbors and the heartfelt 
gratitude of a thaukful posterity. 

H. R. 



UNIVERSITY EXTENSION IN WESTERN 
MASSACHUSETTS. 

It is safe to say that the prosperity of a nation or 
people is measured by its intelligeEce. Here in 
the United States there is a lack of education above 
a certain point among the busy working class. It 
is the purpose of University Extension to make 
good this deficiency and to put the desired courses 
of instruction within the reach of those whose cir- 
cumstances forbid a regular college training. The 
interest that has been taken in this subject by the 
foremost of our country's educated men, has in- 
creased, until at present the system now proposed 
is l)elieved to be the correct solution of the problem. 

In a state such as Massachusetts, abounding in 
colleges, the opportunities for University Extension 
are unusually good. Where such institutions are 
few, and huudreds of miles ajiart, greater and in- 
surmountable obstacles present themselves. Real- 
izing these advantages a system has recently been 
perfected in Western Massachusetts by a committee 
appointed for the purpose. A number of citizens 
in any community may by corresponding with this 
committee secure the services of an instructor, gen- 
erally a professor in some college or university, who 
will deliver a course of six lectures on the subject 



AGGIE LIFE. 



125 



desired. In accordaace with this plan the instruc- 
tor meets his class ouce a week. A printed sylla- 
bus is previously distributed to the audience and 
opportunities are "iven for tnkins notes. At each 
lecture references are made to books pertaining to 
the subject of the course and also topics are pro- 
vided upon which short papers are to be written for 
correction by the instructor. At the close of the 
course those who so desire are examined and if suc- 
cessful in passing they are awarded the certificate 
of the American Society of University Extension. 

With the above intention courses have been pre- 
pared in astronomy, sociology, physics and chemis- 
try. Besides these biology, botany and zoology 
are treated so as to cover the subjects thoroughly. 
Courses are also offered in Greek poetry, drama 
and mythology ; in economics and civil government. 
English history is taught as portrayed in the plays 
of Shakespeare, in a series of seven lectures. 

It is sincerely hoped by those f<.)remost in this 
movement that the o[)portunities presented for the 
further education of the common people of this part 
of the state will be improved to the advancement of 
their general welfare and prosijerity. 

F. L. C. 



A CORRECTION. 
In the last number of the Life we stated that 
Fres't Goodell and the committee of which he was 
chairman were charged with the commission of rec- 
ommending Hon. J. E. Russell for the position of 
Secretary of Agriculture. This was a mistake. 
Mr. Russell was first interviewed and declined to 
accept such a position thus obliging the committee 
to give up that part of their [ilau. They then 
decided to present the name of Major Henry E. 
Alvord for the position of Assistant Secretary. 
Major Alvord was at one time professor of Agri- 
culture here and has always been active iu the pro- 
motion of this science. We give below the letter 
of recommendation. 

January, 1893. 
To THE President of the United States : 

Sir : Assuming that the position of Assistant 
Secretary of the Department of Agriculture will be 
vacated by the present incumbent in March next, 
and that the duties of that office will continue to be 
mainly a supervision of the various scientific 



branches of I he Department, requiring special qual- 
ifications as well as general executive ability, we 
have the honor to suggest to you the appointment 
of Henry K. Alvord of Virginia (Levvisville P. 0., 
Fairfax County.) 

Major Alvord has been during the last twenty 
years actively associated with the progressive agri- 
cultural workers of the country, has held numerous 
positions of honor and trust in various prominent 
agricultural organizations, has an extensive acquain- 
tance among agricultural leaders and public men, 
and is himself widely and favorably known. He 
has been for several years President of the Mary- 
land Agricultural College and Director of its Ex- 
periment Station ; was previously Professor of Agri- 
culture at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
and for five yetirs was general manager of the cele- 
brated Houghton Farm, iu Oiauge County, Nevr 
York. 

We believe that by ex[)erience and personal capa- 
city jMajor Alvord is eminently qualified for the 
place, and that his a[)pointmeut as Assistant Secre- 
tary of Agriculture would be heartily approved for 
its fitness, by the public and press interested in the 
Department and its successful administration. 
Very respectfully yours, 
Henry H. Goodell, 
President Massaclinsetts Agricultural College. 
J. H. Smart, 
President Purdue University, (A. & M. College) Indiana. 
Geo. W. Athekton, 
President Pennsylvania State College. 
S. D. Lee, 
President Agricultural and Mechanical College of Miss. 
Chas. W. Daeney, Jr. , 
President University of Tennessee. 
J. M. McBryde, 
President Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College. 



A HIGHWAYMAN. 

Young Cupid, in a rogue's disguise, 

Stole to a lonesome heath ; 
A brace of pistols iu his belt, 

A sturdy heart beneath. 

And there I met him all alone, 

I sang a merry measure, 
— Until he pulled his pistols, and 

Demanded all my treasure ! 

But as I saw behind his mask, 

I gave a happy start. 
And to this highwayman of love 

I gladly gave my heart. 

— Williams Weekly. 



126 



AGGiE i/Ir-'i:'.. 



Colle^? No't^S- 



— All subscribers who have not yet forwarded 
their subscriptions will confer a great favor on the 
Business Manager by sending at once as all accounts 
must be settled before the new board is chosen at 
the end of the term. 

— Rubber boots on drill, — three demerits. 

— Buy your spring hats of Blodgett and Clark. 

— E. C. Howard, '93, has been temporarily on the 
sick list. 

— N. Shultis, '96, has returned after a short stay 
at his home. 

— C. H. [>aue, '95, was indisposed for a few days, 
but is out again. 

— Not many of the students were out of town the 
22d on account of the storm. 

— R. A. Cooley, '95, has been confined to his room 
for several days by sickness. 

— Freshmen group pictures are recent additions 
to the individual art galleries. 

— It is gratifying to see the continued interest 
which attends the singing class. 

— The catalogue will probably be distributed 
during the last part of this month. 

— Frank E. Paige, ex-treasurer of the college, 
spent a few days in town last week. 

— Recent happenuigs in college have gone to show 
that "Thieves are not all dead yet." 

— The Sophomores take up Surveying this week. 
Final exam, in Mensuration Monday. 

— A. E. Melendy, '93, went to South Deerfleld 
last Friday to attend the funeral of his grandmother. 

— Prof. Paige was unable to lecture to the Seniors 
last Thursday as he was "snowed in" at West 
Pelham. 

— The second half of the dancing course began 
last Friday night, and the class was considerably 
enlarged. 

— There is positively no truth in the rumor that 
the college is to be closed on account of 
sickness. 

— The lecture bv Prcs. Gates of Amherst college 
on "Patriotism in times of peace," has been 
postponed. 



—Perry, '93, Keith, '94, and Harper, '96, attended 
the Washington's Birthday Reception at Smith Col- 
lege last week. 

— The heavy storms of last week caused an inter- 
ruption of mail commuuicatiou which was felt some- 
what among us. 

— ". P. Lounsbury, '94, is assisting Prof. Fernald 
in his work at the "buggery" during the absence of 
A. H. Kirkland. '94. 

— The following promotion is announced in the 
military department : Cadet Corporal Spaulding to 
be sergeant in Co. B. 

— H. D. Clark, '93, F. T. Harlow, '93, H. J. 
Putnam, '94. H. G. btockwell, '94, L. M. Barker, 
'94, are still on the sick list. 

— F. S. Hoyt, '93, has had charge of the meteoro- 
logic-il station during the abseuce of the regular 
assistant, F. L. Warren, '95. 

— It is probable that no more concerts will be 
given by the Glee Club at present owing to the sick- 
ness of Mr. Clark, the leader. 

— The indoor athletic meets are better patronized 
than ever before, both in the number of entries and 
in the attendance of spectators. 

— Quite a number of students propose attending 
the annual Gymnasium Exhibition at Wesleyan 
Academy to be held next Monday evening. 

— H. F. Staples, '93, H. T. Edwards, '96, W. S. 
Bemis, '95, B.K. Jones, '96, who were recently at 
home on account of sickness, have returned. 

— H. U. Clark, '93, and G. F. Billings, '95, are 
confined by illness. Their absence is keenly felt by 
the glee club, of which they are both members. 

— President Goodell has been elected a mem- 
ber of the executive committee of the Connecticut 
Valley Alumni Association of Amherst College. 

— Feb. 28, President Goodell and Prof. Brooks 
attended a meeting of the Committee on Agricul- 
ture to discuss matters in relation to the college. 

— Several students are taking next term's work 
in advance in order to officiate upon the Columbia 
Guide Corps, at Chicago, during the spring term. 

— Rev. Albert li. Dunning of Boston, editor of 
the Congregalionalist, will deliver the annual ad- 
dress before the college Y. M. C. A. at Commence- 
ment. 



\ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



127 



— A bill has beeu reported unanimously by the 
committee on agriculture, appropriating $165,000 
for the use of the gypsy motii commission for the 
coming season. 

— Through a typographical error in our last issue 
the article entitled, "The Hawaiian Situation" was 
credited to F. L. G., whereas it should have been 
toF. L. C, '96. 

— The innovation of placing books of interest on 
special subjects of study in the various courses, in 
the college reading room, meets with the hearty ap- 
proval of the students. 

— Prof. J. B. Paige delivered a lecture on "The 
anatomy, functions and diseases of the horse's foot," 
at an institute of the Housatonie agricultural society 
at Great Barrington, yesterday. 

— The Glee (.'lub gave a concert at Whately on 
Wednesday evening the IStli. Upon the evening 
of the 17tli a concert was given at .Sonth Deerfleld, 
assisted by R. A. Cooley, '95, as reader. 

— The new Life board will be elected Thursday, 
Mar. 9, so it is quite essential that all contributions 
should be forwarded very soon. The result of the 
election will be announced in the next issue. 

— Prof. C. S. Walker has been elected as a mem- 
ber of the committee in charge of the lectures for 
the furtherance of university extension in this sec- 
tion and he has also been selected to talk about 
economics and civil government. 

— The Harvard Glee Club is to give a concert in 
the Academy of Music, Northampton, March 8th. 
An excellent opportunity is thus afforded students 
interested in college singing to liear the Glee Club 
from the Great American University. 

— Guy A. Hubbard, '96, has left college on ac- 
count of his intention to enter the Boston Conserva- 
tory of Music. He has played 1st clarinet in the 
orchestra and band since entering college, and will be 
especially missed by those organizations. 

— Quite extensive alterations are being made in 
the zoological museum. The side cases have been 
quite extensively enlarged and all the available 
space on the floor is being taken up by roomy cases. 
When the work is completed the museum will afford 
much better facilities for preserving specimens than 
formerlj'. 



— S. A. Phillips has the contract for putting in 
the heating apparatus at the Hatch barn. The office, 
dairy-room, and both the cellar and stables in the 
north wing are to be heated. The hot water system 
is to be used. 

— While sickness exists in the dormitories, stu- 
dents ought to be more careful of their behavior in 
the entries and upon the landings. We are reminded 
in all cases of the necessity of quietness by notices 
posted in various places, but these do not remedy 
the difficulty. It is bad enough to be sick in Colleo-e 
without being further disturbed by the trampino-, 
songs and cat-calls [terpetrated by a thoughtless 
few. 

— Saturday evening, Feb. 8, the Remenyi Concert 
Company entertained an appreciative audience at 
College hall. The great feature was Remenyi's 
violin playing which commanded repeated encores. 
On the whole the concert which was an extra one 
was a great success. The next and closing enter- 
tainment of the course will be given March 2, by 
"The Boston Leaders" who number among their 
artists Mr. De Seve, well known as one of the lead- 
ing violinists in the country. The company is to 
be assisted by Heiurich Schiiecker, the harpist, who 
h.as appeared the last two seasons in College H:dl 
and therefore needs no introduction to Amherst 
people. 



THE INDEX. 

As our college is continually growing and extend- 
ing its influence, so must the publications and organ- 
izations of the college not only grow but command 
a greater influence in the future. 

The lirst Index of the M. A. C. was published in 
1869. It was a modest little book, of paper covers 
and rough sketches,— sketches of an entirely differ- 
ent character from those of the more recent Indexes. 
Since then the Junior publication has been chano-ed 
in size, appearance, quality and quantity of original 
matter, and the tenor of the book has been in keep- 
ing with the advance of our college in Agriculture 
and Mechanic Arts, until today we have the '94 
J/idea; which fltly represents our college and honors 
the class that published it. The Index is more a 
college annual than a class-book. A class-book is 
issued by a certain class and contains only such 
matter as is of interest to that class, it is of little 



128 



AGGIE LIFE. 



interest to those outside of the class and has little to 
saj- of the college or university to which it belongs. 

Is not the M. A. C. Index a college annual? Does 
il not recognize the whole college? Is not the whole 
college interested in it? Yes, it is a college annual. 
It is not, and never was, a class-book from the fact 
that the Junior class has the honor of issuing il. 

The '1)4 Index Board has greatly improved the 
future of the M. A. C. Index by advancing this idea 
and bringi;)g it so prominently before the students. 
The '95 Board realizes its lesponsibility both to its 
alma mater and its class, it realizes that our college 
is taking great strides towards that high position as 
a scienlilic college which it is to hold in the near fu- 
ture, and it realizes that work in the literary line 
must advance correspondingly. 

The fact that through the action of one of our 
professors, and the interest shown in this endeavor 
by our President and the faculty, we have probably 
secured a new athletic field ; that through the work 
of our new athletic association the students are be- 
■coming more interested in athletics, and the fact 
that more and more enthusiasm is being shown in 
the work of our baseball and football learns, — all 
this shows that our college is rapidly gaining a rep- 
utation for athletics and shows to the '95 Board 
that college spirit shown in this direction should be 
duly recognized. It is not the object of the writer 
to call attention to the '95 Board and its work, but 
to the first editorial in the '94 Index, and to thank 
the '94 Board for their kind offer of assistance. In 
extending this offer of aid the Board has broken an 
old college custom. 

A college in some respects is a very conservative 
institution, although it is generally fully abreast 
of the times, its students will cling to some cus- 
toms which are nothing less than relics of barbarism ; 
rushes. Freshman-night rackets, and jealousy be- 
tween one Index Boaid and the succeeding one are 
the objectional customs that, until of late, have 
clung to our college. The old custom of celebrating 
the close of the Freshman year is practically done 
away with. It is hoped that the feeble attempt at 
rushing, witnessed last year, will not be repeated. 
Now that '94's Board has given '95 an opportunity 
to break up the third custom named, it will not h-'s- 
itate to do so, and, in all probability, will in turn, 
-offer to '96 similar assistance. The members of 



the '95 Board can say in the words of their prede- 
cessors that, "We shall do all in our power to make 
it a thing of the past." But '95 would not forget 
the '93 Board to wliich it naturally looked for ad- 
vice. The Seniors have always rendered valuable 
aid to the Sophomores in their work upon the Index 
and this year is no exception. 

In thanking the members of the '93 Board for 
their kindness,'95 would notfor a moment have them 
believe that it will give up their aid and advice for 
that of '94, but that, hein| so fortunate as to secure 
an interest in its work from both the other Boards 
in college, it will strive to make good use of the ex- 
tra advantages thus gained. 

F. C. T. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

Indoor Meet, SATUEOAy, Feb. 18, 1892. 

Heavy Weight Sjjarring [150 lbs. and over.) 

1st. Boardman, '94. 2nd. Lehuert, '93 

3d. Bagg, '95. 

Quarter Mile Walk. 

1st Hemmeuway,'95. 2ud. K. T. Harlow '93. 

3d. L. H. Bacon, '94. 

Parallel Bars. 

1st. Howard. '94. 2nd. Tinoco, '93. 

3d. Baker, '93. 

Points by Classes, — 

'94—11. '93—10. 

•95—6. 
Indoor Meet, Saturday, Feb. 25, 1893. 
Three Standing Jumps . 
1st Toole, '95. 27 fl. 11 in. 2ud L. H. Bacon, '94. 
3d. H.J. Fowler, '94. 
Half Mile Run. 
1st. H. J. Fowler, '94. 2nd. Toole, '95. 
3d. Crehore, '95. 
Running Hop, Step and Jump. 
1st. Davis,'93.37 ft. 6 in. 2nd. Toole, '95. 
3d. Frost, '95. 
Three Legged Race. 

93 



1st. 



j Spaulding, '94. .. . f W"alker,'93 
I VVliite, '94 '^'^'^* I Perry, '93. 

„ , j Dickinson, '95. 
I Smith, '95 
Points by Classes, — 

'94—14 '93—8 

'95—14 



AGGIE LIFE. 



129 



Events for Sat., March 4 : 

Light Weight Wrestling (under 150 lbs.) 
Floor Tumbling. 

Heavy Weight Wrestling (150 lbs. or over.) 
Pole Vault. 
Events for Saturday, March 11 : 
Barrel Eoll. 
Backward Jump. 
One Mile Relay Race. 
The relay race is to be by a picked team of five 
from each of the four classes, against time. 
Per Order 

H. C. Davis. Pres. 

LovFELL Manlet, Sec. 



lumrflB 



l©tfS» 



'81. — Charles L. Flint is located at No. 25 Con- 
gress St., Boston, instead of at No. 15 as was 
stated in our last issue. It is E. K. Flint, '87, 
who is located at No. 15. 

'88. — F. S. Cooley has been awarded first and 
third piizes on articles delivered before the Hamp- 
shire Agricultural Society. 

'89. — A. L. Miles of Rutland spent a few days at 
the college last week. 

'69. — Herbert E Woodbury, Principal of the 
Northboro High School, made a short visit here last 
week. 

'90. — D. Barry was in tovvn last Sunday. 

'90. — F. J. Smith, president of the county Chris- 
tian Endeavor Union, presided at the conference 
held at the East Amherst Congregational Church. 

'90. — James B. Maynard, ex-'90, of Worcester, 
book-keeper for Maynard & Ma3nard, visited here 
last week. 

'90. — Frank O. Williams of Sunderland was 
united in marriage to Miss Kathleen Roberts of 
North Amherst, Fob. 22d. 

'91. — F. L. Arnold, Assistant Chemist at the 
State Experiment Station, received second prize 
from the Hampshire Agricultural Society for an ar- 
ticle giveu before that society. " 

'92. — H. C. West of Belchertown spent Sunday, 
Feb. 19, with friends at college. 



'92. — W. I. Boynton, student at the Boston Den- 
tal College, has been spending a short vacation at 
North Amherst. 

'92.— M. H. Williams, Tutor at the Harvard Vet- 
erinary College, is speudiug a few days at his home, 
Sunderland, and called ai the college last Friday. 



Y. M. C. A. TOPICS. 

March 2d — Christian Cooperation. Es.l7:8-12; 
Rom. 15:1. A. J. Blorse. 

March 5tli— What is Christ to Us? Gal. 3 :26-29 ; 
Col. 1 :27, 28. S. Saito. 

Blarcli 9th — Readiness V) Serve God. Rom. 1 :13- 
16 ; Gal. 6 :9, 10. H. G. Stockwell. 

March 12th — The Sustaining Power of a Clear Con- 
science. Dan. 3:16-18; Acts 7 :55-60. 
H. P. Smead. 



BEATS TWO PAIR. 

"Pa, what's a science? " the small boy asked. 

The parent, calm as fate, 
Replied, " 'Tls to hold a Royal Flush 

When the other man holds a Straight." 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE. 



10s MAIN STREET, - NOJtTHAMFTON, MASS^ 



130 



AGGIE LIFE. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES. 

Chapel lias been made optional at Biovvn. 

The new Yale Law School annual will be called 
the Yale Shingle. 

Bates college hopes to erect a library building in 
honor of J. C. Blair. 

Tiie 25 fratei-nities at Cornell have thus far this 
year initiated 192 men. 

There is talk of founding a Naval Academy on 
the lake front at Chicago. 

The late James G. Blaine was a graduate of 
Wabhington and .lefferson college. 

About 300 students are taking the course in jour- 
nalism offered at the Univ. of Chicago. 

The Chicago University nine have received 150 
applications for games this spring. 

Football, baseball and rowing are finding their 
way into Japanese educational institutions. 

The State University of Iowa will soon have a 
new athletic field through alumni subscriptions. 

There are in the United States G500 women in 
colleges who are members of Greek letter fraternities. 

Scarlet fever has appeared at Tufts and quaran- 
tine measures have been adopted to pi event its 
spreading. 

The Smith Freshmen have new class pins in the 
form of the letter S, of silver interlinked with '96 in 
class color, purple. 

Over 500 college students will form an organiza- 
tion to be known as the Columbian Guide Corps at 
the World's Fair next summer. 

Princeton and Wesleyan have waged war against 
"cribl)ing" or "skidding". It is purely a student 
movement to right a great wrong. 

The captain of the Harvard eleven has sent letters 
to prominent alumni asking for opinions on the 
adoption of the undergraduate rule. 

The Princeton Faculty have made a rule forbid- 
ding the undergraduates to wear the emblem of any 
outside athletic club in competition. 

The Dartmouth Glee Club has made arrangements 
to accompany the baseball team on its spring trip 
and give concerts at the same places. 

The movement which resulted in the establish- 
ment of about 400 college Y. M. C. A. organiza- 
tions started in Princeton 15 years ago. 



H. D. HEMENWAY, 



DEALER IN 



Student Supplies, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, NOTE BOOKS, WHITE GLOVES, 

POCKET LENSES, STATIONERY, 

CHOICE CONFECTIONERY, 

FIGS, ETC. 

PRICES LOW. 

21 NORTH COLLEGE. 

SWIFT DOUBLE ACTION REVOLVER, 



5-shot 38 c;i]ibrcV .j^.s^ '-— «S''^- i 
using Zi^ S. fin.1 w/* ^^ -l^^*^/ ® 
C F. carU'idg'es. ^ ■_- 

Tha Bsant7, Hitsrial ani !(*'/■ 
Workmanship Unequalleii. ^=51^1^. 
The Most Improved Double 

Action Revolver in the Marhet. 

Price S70, by mail., postpaid. 




THE BOSTON BUL.L. DOG REVOLVE R $3 .25 . 

THE OHAMRION SHOT GUN ONL.Y $12. OO. 

FOR SALE BY 

I. C. GREENE, 

BOX 386, - - - A^';HERST, tVIASS. 

Al' corrospondcnco will receive prompt attention. 



STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 



NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 
FIRST CLASS GOODS. PRICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH collbqe:. 
AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-OpmtiY6 Steam Lamidry^^ 

and Carpet Reiiovatini Estatilislitiieiit. 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



131 



Tes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 



He 



" Lamps aiifi Laiiip Ooofe are Oiirs." 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED i SALE STABLE, 

T. L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



J. A. RAWSO: 



df:aler in 



WATCHES, GIiOGHS, JEWEIiRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

FIHE STATIOMERY. 
REP.41Hl?ja NEMLY AdO ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



a 0. PE 



H 




-A-Iw^HEUST , 



3VE.A.SS. 



THE FUNNIEST JOKE. 

The funniest joke I ever heard. 

From no comic paper came, 
But our dear professor spake the word. 

To his scholars tried — and tame. 

Perhaps 'twas because he sweetly smiled. 

And fixed upon us his eye; 
But the class burst forth into laughter wild, 

That startled tlie very sky. 

Oh, hundreds of students may have sat. 

And grinned in the selfsame way. 
Yet that gag remains as fresh and pat. 

As it was on its natal day. 

So the funniest joke I ever heard. 

From no comic paper came, 
But our dear professor spake the word 

To his scholars tried — aud tame. 

— The Polytechnic. 



One chair will do, on a pinch for two, 

For love will find a way ; 
But one kiss won't do, nor will a few. 

For love don't work that way. 

— TJie Polytechnic. 



NOTICES. 

Mails leave the college for the post-ofHce at 1 p. M. and 
7-40 p. M. on week days. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Springfield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, G-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massa- 
chusetts, 7-45, 10 45, A. M. 4 00, 6-45 p. M. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8 30, 10-45 a. 
M. 4-00, 6 45 p. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10 45 a. m. 6 45, 8-30 p. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. M. 

The President will be at his office from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurer wiU be at liis office from 3 to 5 
p. M. ou Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the term. 

The Museum of Natural History will be open to 
visitors on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdaj'S, and 
Fridays from 2 45 to 3-45 p. m. 

The college library will be open from 2 to 4 p. ji. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. Ou Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m. and from 1 to 4 p. m., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 



132 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes ;^ Rubbers 

in town at 
"wilxjI^vivis' block;. 



Slieet Music, 



Music Books, 



Strings 

FOR the: violin, banjo, aUITAR, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

F ERD. FANEU F 

AMOERST, MASS. 



.^DENTISTS. 5). 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CTJTLEIt'S BLOCK, AMBEItST, MA.SS. 



OFFICE IIOUKS: 
9 A.. IsO:. TO 5 F. 1>/L. 

Ether and Nitrons Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R.. BENNETT, 
Je'weler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PJSTSICIJJfS' PBXSCBIPTIONS C AB,E FTJIjIjT 
COMPO UlfDEn, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your CO^S here. 

WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQDAT.TERS FOK 

FURNISHING GOODS 

AT 

,TT k CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



For Bnits and Fall QvercQats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 

Fli ITAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, §3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, §2.00, §2.50 AND §3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

0= G. COUCM & SON'So 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseaf, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office op 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Oifice, Cook's JBlocJe, Amherst, Mass, 



VJ 



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H 



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DEUEL'S mm STOR 



Anilierst House Bloct 



Amlisrsl Mass. 



so. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHEE{ST, MiiSS. 

Pure Dru^^s and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPOllTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for PLstols, and Sporting and Syj-ingfleld Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls respoiided to at residence, first door west 
■ol Wood's Hotel. 



T850. 



1892. 



Ik. J' W fjlS? 



THE ^ FHOTD B RaFHaM. 

NEW SKY LIQHX. 
EINLARGEID OPERATING ROOM. 

€LASS AND^OCJETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY . 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hourj, 9 to 12 a. jr., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



I^^Etliei' aD(1 Nitrous Oxide Gas administered wiien 
desired. 



A.T THCE 



AMHERST GASH SHOE ST0RE 

You can get tiie most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 

A. GLYNN, 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specially. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



y/iilitai^y Suits and Tpimmings. 



assachusetts Aaricultural Colleae, 



BB^ 









c^.":^''. ^ 



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AGGIE LIFE 



J5.M:HEiRHT, MiiEB., MARCH iS, IBB 3. 



"STOL. III. Hd. 12. 



^arp^n-tfr ^ ^©rffiovisf , 



*PR1MTERS, 



* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURy\L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We -would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS. 



THE AlERST 




Dm 



C, H, SANDERSON & CO.. 



CASH DEALERS IN 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH EOW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEI|SOIt k ThOMPSOI^, 



CASH DEALERS IK 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOE EVERYBODY. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSE S. PILLOWS, STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPER IES^ 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All Goods BTRICTEY CASH and at 
LOWEST raiCES. 

E. D. ]\1A_RSH, 

10 PHCENIX ROW, - AMHERST, MASS. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



K.E:Fj»^I2iIKrC3- IDOaSTB I'E.OIVIFTX.'S^-. 



T. W. SLOAN. 

2 I'HCENIX RO W. 



mum 




er, 



SIEA/H AND GAS FITTER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air F'urnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heatins a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., MARCH 15, 1893. 



No. 12 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Oilice as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS : 

G. F. CUELEY, '93, Editor-in-Chief, 

J. E. PEERT, '93, Business Manager, 

E. C. HOWARD, '93, F. S. HOTT, '93, 

A. E. MELENDT, '93. 0. P. WALKER, '94, 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KIllTH, '94, 

T. P. FOLEY, '95. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



tt.^?t\V-^t^ Ik V\a^^ViQ\i^t^ ^^^^^-^t^^. 



Ed g"t© rials. 



The athletic associatioa deserves much credit for 
planning and carrying out the series of indoor meets 
which have been so much enjoyed by the students 
duiiug the past winter. Tliey have been successful 
from the start and the interest manifested by the 
contestants resulting from class competition has but 
increased as the season advanced. Everything is 
certainly most favorable for a creditable field day 
during the next term and when the athletic directors 
have formulated and announced their plans we shall 
expect some lively work by aspirants for athletic 
honors. 



Several times of late books of reference have 
been taken from the library reading-room and de- 
tained for some time much to the annoyance of 
others of the students who have wished to consult 
them. The books taken have been those placed 
temporarily in the reading room from the library 
that they might be more readily accessible to all. 
Books so placed in the reference room are all dis- 
tinctly marked, "Not to be taken from the 



Library" and any one disobeying this injunction is 
depriving others of privileges which belong equally 
to all. Every student ought to respect the kindness 
of our President in making library books for which 
there is frequent call so much easier for reference 
and should understand that all have an equal right 
to use them. We trust that the students will see 
to it that that the offence is not repeated. 



When the present method of electing the Aggie 
Life editors was adopted, it was thought that the 
recommendations of the different classes would en- 
able the retiring seniors to judge more accurately 
what men to select ; but there can be no doubt 
that this measure is now regarded simply as a matter 
of form to be observed and of no consequence in 
affecting the result of the election. In the last 
recommendations, one class realizing the insignifi- 
cance of the step did not trouble to ballot on the 
matter, but chose their men by acclamation. In 
view of the fact that this plan offers no aid to those 
empowered with the choosing of the new board, it 
would seem advisable to abolish this custom at the 
first mass meeting of the college. Another custom 
which it would be well to establish is to have the 
retiring editor-in-chief or business manager call and 
act as chairman of the meeting of the new board for 
organization. 



The Western Alumni Association of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College was organized at 
Chicago a little over two years ago. Although the 
graduates who were present at the first meeting 
were few in number owing to the distances from 
which they were obliged to come, the gathering was 
a success in every respect. Since that time the 
organization has done much for the good of the in- 
stitution by bringing the many alumni who resided 
in the far west into a closer relation to their alma 
mater. To still more increase its influence the as- 



134 



AGGIE LIFE. 



sociatiou has agreed to this year ofifer the freshmen 
and sophomores prizes for excellence in declama- 
tion ; il will also have charge of the college head- 
quarters at Chicago next summer and will hold a 
meeting in that city at wliich it is expected many of 
the students and instructors will he present. Such 
evidences of loyalty as these should not be ovei- 
looked. To the Western Alumni Association the col- 
lege owes the heartiest cooperation and support it 
is able to oive. 



While the college has been making such exten- 
sive preparations for its exhibit at the Columbian 
Exposition, it is a noticeable fact that the student 
body receives no recognition. As a college fails to 
perform its function without the studeut body, it 
would seem that some recognition of it should be 
made in the exhibit of our institution. Of course 
mere photographs could give no definite idea as to 
the character and life of the students in an institu- 
tion of learning, yet for want of a better means of 
showing our workings as a body, why could not 
group photographs be placed in a convenient place, 
in connection with the exhiliit of grounds, appara- 
tus and the material part of the college? Surely 
such photographs as those of our glee club, orches- 
tra, the various editorial boards and our athletic 
teams, would make a pleasing exhibit, and in addi- 
tion to this, would go far toward raising our stand- 
ing in the eyes of those to whom we are but little 
known. Every college of prominence in the country 
is to have such an exhibit, why cannot we give a 
little insiglit into our social, literary and athletic life 
in addition to the display made of our other re- 
sources ? 



With this issue of the Life, the present board of 
editors makes its exit. The duties imposed upon 
us oue year ago have been completed to the best of 
our ability, and it is now in turn our place to give 
wa_y to others and to entrust to the incoming board, 
these responsible charges. It has not been our 
plan to effect any great revolution in the general 
make up of the paper but we have endeavored sim- 
ply to carry out the ideas of our predecessors. Our 
principal motive has been to make the Life a repre- 
sentative M. A. C. newspaper, and only so far as 
we have been successful in this are we quite satis- 



fied with the results. We have not been exempt 
from errors, and we can say with the preceding 
boards that could we begin anew, we might cause 
our work to be more satisfactory to ourselves, at 
least. The increase in the number of editors has 
proved to have l)een a wise move and the lightness 
with which the work has fallen on the individual has 
of itself, robbed tlie editorial work of many of its 
reputed difficulties. Furthermore, in submitting the 
editing of the paper to the new board, we can as- 
sure them that pleasant and beneficial duties await 
them, and trust that they will profit by our failings, 
ever keeping in mind the highest interests of Aggie 
Life, our representative publication. 



eBu 



AN IMPORTANT QUESTION. 

The time is approaching when an important ques- 
tion must be answered bj' each one of us. It is this : 
"Shall I attend the World's Columbian Exposition 
at Chicago during ihe coming summer?" We wish 
that all might realize the importance of deciding this 
question in the affirmative. 

The occasion, as we all know, is the celebration 
of the four-hundredth anniversary of the discovery 
of America by Columbus, and able men, and women 
too, from all parts of our Union, and even from the 
whole world, are sparing no eflforts to make the af- 
fair what it should be — one of the grandest in the 
history of our country. 

This is not to be the first world's fair ever known, 
and although il may not be the last, yet, such an 
opportunity as this may never again present itself to 
the present generation. There have been fairs of a 
similar nature in London, one in Vienna, and still 
another of no small importance in Paris. In our 
own country we have no London ; no Vienna ; no 
Paris, with an Eiffel Tovver nearly one thousand 
feet in height ; but we have a Chiciigo, a typical 
American city, a world-wide wonder. Starting with 
twelve families in 1832, it increased five hundred 
and seventy per cent, in twenty, years, — a growth 
that is regarded as without a parallel. It bravely 
survived the calamity of 1871, and to-day it is the 
home of one million and a quarter human beings. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



135 



Yes, the city of Chicago is a wonder in itself. 

AVitliin the limits of this western monster of a 
city, lies the large tract of land known as Jackson 
Park. This is to be the center of attraction during 
the coming summer. Here have been erected struc- 
tures which twenty years ago would have been re- 
garded as impossibilities. Memorial Hall of '76 at 
Philadelphia would serve only as an entry into some 
of the new Chicago buildings. 

Perhaps there is no better way of showing the 
value of a visit to the "White City," than by taking 
a glance at a few of the buildings, with their con- 
tents, as they will appear next summer. 

A structure of striking appearance, and one that 
will be of importance to those interested in Horti- 
culture, is Horticultural Hall, an immense building 
one-tifth of a mile in length, with a giaceful dome 
towering to the height of one hundred and thirty- 
two feel. In this hall will be exhibited in profusion, 
representatives of every variety of plant ubtainable. 
Aquatic plants and shrubs will occupy a prominent 
position ; a .Japanese exhibit will flourish in one cor- 
ner, while within easy access will be a "wooded 
island," which will be made to "blossom as the rose." 

An exhibit that will be of especial interest to us, 
will be found in the Agricultural Building. Within 
the massive walls of this edifice will be an elaborate 
displa3 of agricultural products and farm implements. 
If the farmers of the United States could but make 
a study of the contents of this building, their eyes 
would indeed be opened. 

Then there will be other buildings, perhaps of less 
interest to us : Fisheries, Mines, Administration, 
Woman's, Government, and rransportation Build- 
ings. The last covers eighteen acres and will con- 
tain exhibits of almost every kind of machinery used 
in transportation. Apart from this is Machinery 
Hall, enclosing seventeen acres of machinery space. 
The progress of electrical science will be shown in 
the Electrical Building, where a model electrical 
dwelling-house will be an attractive feature. 

Next is the Manufactures and Liberal Arts Build- 
ing, which is not only the largest structure on the 
grounds, but is the largest structure ever erected by 
man. Its length is one third -of a mile, and the 
. highest point of the roof measures two hundred and 
thirty-two feet from the ground. One-half million 
of people can easily find standing-room on its thirty 



acres of floor space, while the side galleries add four- 
teen acres more. Imagine, if you can, a field of 
four acres ; then imagine eleven of these fields to- 
gether, and you have the floor and gallery space. 
This structure, vrhich could swallow three Coliseums, 
will contain such a display of educational and manu- 
factured exhibits, that a person would be obliged to 
walk twenty miles a day Cor seven days in order to 
see them all. 

These few structures which have been mentioned, 
will include three-lourths of the roofed area of the 
grounds. The various states of the Union and 
foreign nations will occupy the other fourth. Of 
our forty-four states, thirty have erected pavilions, 
while foreign countries have already set apart 
S8, 000, 000 for the work. Altogether there are to 
be represented eighty-six nations or colonies, and it 
is said that an enumeration of the marvels to be 
exhibited by any one great nation would fill volumes, 
England, Germany, and France are deeply interested 
in the work ; Russia, Norway, .'-(weeden, Denmark, 
Austria, Spain, Italy, and Greece — all are sparing 
no efforts to be well represented ; republics of South 
and Central America have responded readily ; the 
various countries of Africa will exhibit in villages ; 
products are coining from all parts of Asia and Poly- 
nesia, making the Chicago Exposition stand vastly 
superior to all its predecessors. 

It is almost an utter impossibility for us to esti- 
mate the benefits to be derived from a visit to these 
magnificent structures, and from a careful study of 
the exhibits of each. Director-general Davis has 
said that a visit to the World's Fair mny well be 
compared with a college education. A thorough 
study of the exhibits of any one department would 
give one a fair education in that line ; while a study 
of all the departments — which will be next to im- 
possible, would give one a general education of the 
highest order. The exhibits of foreig.i nations in 
their native villages will also be instructive. 

lu view of these facts, no one should feel that he 
cannot afford to visit the World's Exi)osition ; he 
should think rather, that he cannot afford to lose 
such an opportunity. As citizens of the United 
States let us feel that il is our duty to support this, 
the most elaborate fair which any nation has ever 
attempted. 

G. H. M. 



136 



AGGIE LIFE. 



SIGNAL SERVICE AT THE M. A. G. 

One of the plaus of ihe College authorities has 
materialized now that the meteorological observa- 
tory in South College tower is to be equipped as a 
Signal Service Station. A complete set of signal 
flags will be obtained and these will he floated from 
a hollow rim flagstaff rising to a height of forty- 
seven feet above the roof of the tower, thus making 
the total height of the signal one hundred and twelve 
feet. By means of a very ingenious arrangement, 
the operator will be able to hoist the proper signals 
at all times from the flag-room, without exposing 
himself to the weather. A flue standard barometer 
has been purchased Hud will be used to verify the 
readings of the barograph; also, a ''Greely self- 
starting, self-stopping, ink writing telegraph regis- 
ter ; " together with the usual sounder and key. 

Asido from this new Hue of work, several ver3' 
costly instruments have also been addi d to the 
equipment of the observatory. These include ''a 
set of maximum and minimum thermometers ; a 
portable, self-registering anemometer ; and Fergu- 
son's self-recording rain and snow gauge." Bv 
these recent additions to its former apparatus, the 
station is better equipped with self-recording instru- 
ments than any other of its kind in the country. 
Although the station is under the direction of the 
Hatch Experiment Station, it will receive weather 
forecasts from Washington and will cooperate with 
the Weather Bureau in its work. 

These forecasts, telegraphed from Washington 
via Boston, will come direct to the college as soon 
as connections can be made with the Boston wire. 
They will probably be received at 8 o'clock morning 
and evening, although this is not yet fully decided ; 
and the Greely register will be prepared to receive 
and record messages at all hours. Until the line- 
men have finished their work, forecasts will be re- 
ceived at the main office at Amherst and forwarded 
to the college. It has been considered advisable to 
use the cold wave flag as a warning of late or early 
frosts in the spring and fall. 

The flags being displayed at so great an altitude 
will be readily discerned, with the aid of a glass 
from many miles distant, thus benefiting not only 
the people of Amherst but also those of many neigh- 
boring towns. 



Since the Weather Bureau has won for itself a 
steadily increasing popularity by the high per cent, 
of accuracy of its forecasts in the daily press, the 
people of this vicinity will, no doubt, appreciate the 
advantages of an authorized Signal Station at the 
college. M. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 
The final indoor athletic meet of the term took 
place last Saturday. Great interest has been mani- 
fested by the different classes in the contest for the 
pennants, which will probably be placed on exhibi- 
tion by the lieginning of next term. The directors 
will endeavor to give a list of the field-da}- events 
and the date when they take place in the first issue 
of next term. Below will be found a list of last 
Saturday's events with the points as they stand, up 
to date. 

Indoor Mekt, Satdrdat, March 11, 1893. 

Barrel Roll. 
1st. Curley, '96. 2nd. E, H. Clark, '95. 
3d. H. J. Fowler, '94. 
Pole Vault. 
1st. Manley, '94. 2nd. Curley, '96. 

3d. Baker, '93. 
Best vault, 7 ft. 5 in. 
One Mile Relay Race. 
f Crehore f Morse, A. J. 

I Hemeuway Sanderson 

1st. '95. -{Warren 2d. '94. ^ Gifford 

1 Fairl tanks Fowler, H. J. 

l^ Clark, E. H. ^Shepard 

Time, 4 m., 35|^ sec. Time, 4 m. S6^ sec. 

f Bacon, T.S. 
I Fowler, H. M. 
3d. '94. -{ Boardman 
I Brown 
(^ Lewis 
Time, 4 m. 40^ sec. 
Points for Meet : 

'94—14 '95—13 

'96—8 '93—1 

Total for Indoor Meets. 
Whole number of points, 279. 
'94_107 '95—76 

'93—63 '96—33 

Per Order, 

H. C. Davis, Pres. 

Lowell Manlet, Sec.-Treas. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



137 



GENIUS. 

In those old days when elves, fairies and kindred 
beings dwelt in Europe, a somewhat similar class of 
sprites inhabited Western Asia. Of these latter we 
have 10 do, at present, with but one genus. I refer 
to the so-called Genii. An individual of this order 
was called a Genius. 

If my rather misty recollections of the talcs told 
by tlie charmiug Schehererzade serve me rightly, a 
Genius was a powerful spirit who could do much 
for the weal or woe of human kind. Many were the 
stratagems used to gain the help of these Genii, who 
seem to have been very easily outwitted in a bargain. 

From this belief in Geuii arose the habit, when 
people did great deeds, of attributing them to the 
influence of tliose spirits. Later, when belief in such 
superstitious was a thing of the past, the name 
genius still clung to that faculty which enabled men 
to do great deeds and think great thoughts. Thus 
comes our [)resent usage of the word. We speak 
of a man's "genius"' to express our sense of his 
power in some line of action. In this sense genius 
is still considered to be an individual, not a general 
quality. 

"Poets are born, not made." We say that they 
are born because to be a poet one must possess, in- 
herently, qualities that cannot be acquired iu their 
full extent by labor. A poet must be inspired. Fhis 
inspiration consists, in part, of a large faculty of 
vision, the results of much observation. This in- 
spiration is often termed genius. 

For a deflnition ol the term perhaps the following 
is as good as any : Genius is an infiuite capacity 
for work. Observe the use of words. luflnite — 
without limit — applied to capacity, which is synono- 
mous with ability, and qualified by the [jhrase "for 
work," This does not exactly coincide with my old 
idea that a genius had a sort of snap in life. 

But reflection only confirms the truth of the prop- 
osition. Can you point me a genius who did not 
owe his success to capacity tor intense labor? Why, 
even His Satanic Alajesty, whom our Orthodox 
friends hold to be a prince of genii, is represented 
as being eternally busy aud liking to keep other 
folks busy also. Was it not iustilled into our youth- 
ful minds that "Satan fluds some mischief still for 
idle hands to do?" " 

As for successful men, or rather, men of genius, 



who has there been that sat with folded hands and 
^ grew into fame and honor. Are not our present 
public men the busiest of their generation? Did 
not all famous musicians, artists, literarv men, 
warriors, philosophers and inventors devote their 
whole lives to work? And intense work at that? 
Yes, it is true that genius consists in an infiuite 
capacity for work. And if one possesses this capac- 
ity and applies his power of work to that work which 
best unites with his natural aptitudes, then is he, 
and will he be known as a genius. 

F. L. G. 



FORES TUT EXHIBIT. 

The forestry exhibit of this state has been pre- 
pared under the du-ection of Prof. Mayuard and will 
soon be shipped to Chicago. The exhibit comprises 
47 varieties of woods found in this state Each sec- 
tion is three feet long aud cut so as to show cross, 
longitudinal, and oblique surfaces, which were first 
sandpapered and then shellaced, again sandpapered 
and re-shellaced, and now present an excellant ap- 
pearance, the fine grains of the different varieties 
showing perfectly. 



M. A. O. REPUBLICAN GLUB. 
Report of Treasukek. 



Received from 74 taxes, 


$37 


00 


Paid 


for cloth, 


$ 72 






turpentine and [laint. 


23 






candles, tacks and brush. 


20 






torches and expressing. 


14 63 






oil and wicks. 


1 47 






M. A. C. Band, 


7 50 






election returns. 


2 00 






Total expenditures. 


$26 


75 




Amount on hand March 1 . 1893 


10 


25 



$37 00 
Respectfully submitted, 

G. H. Merwin, Treasurer 



The World's Fair athletic grounds will seat 
35,000 people, and contain a half-mile oval track, 
440 yards with one turn, 220 and 300 yards 
straight-away. 



138 



AGGIE LIFE. 



folle^^ flot^S- 



— The new Life board has beeu elected and has 
organized as follows : editor-in-chief, C.F.Walker, 
'94 ; business manager, G.H.Merwin, '94 ; associate 
editors. T. S.Bacon, '94, T.F.Keith, '94. F. L. 
Greene,'94, T.P. Foley, '9.5, E. O. Bagg,'95, C. B. 
Lane, '95, R. L. Hayward, '96. 

— Merwin, '94, was in H;irtford, Conn, last week. 

— The mid term finals are being given this week. 

— Washburn, '96, will not return to college next 
term. 

— Senior exam, in Materia Medica last week 
Monday. 

— L. Manley, '94, has been elected athletic cap- 
tain of that class. 

— E. D. White, '94, spent a few days at VVesleyan 
University last week. 

— There has been an unusual interest taken in 
athletics the last week. 

— Owing to illness Prof. Warner was unable to 
meet his classes last week. 

— M. E. Sellew, '96, has been chosen as reading- 
room director for that class 

— The Life board was photographed to-day at 
Schillare's in Northampton. 

— The last indoor athletic meet of the term was 
held last Saturday afternoon. 

— H.D.Clark, '93, convalescent from the measles, 
has been at home the past week. 

— F. L. Greene, '94, was obliged to go home 
last week on account of sickness. 

--L. W. Smith, '93, has been obliged to go home 
for a few days on account of sickness. 

— The catalogues, which are unusually late, were 
distributed to the students on Mondaj'. 

— Plumbers have been making extensive repairs 
in the heating appai-alus of South College during 
the past week. 

— Quite a number of the students attended the 
Harvard Glee Club concert at Northampton last 
week Wednesday. 

— Pres. Goodell was absent from the college the 
greater part of last week having been called to 
Washington on business. 



— The class of Ninety-five was very pleasantly 
entertained by Prof, and Mrs. Maynard at their 
home last Friday evening. 

— Town-meeting last week Monday ; several of 
the students took lessons in local government and, 
consequently, received drill demerits. 

— Singing school to-night. Prof Charmbury was 
unable to be present last evening necessitating the 
change from the regular night of meeting. 

—P. K. Davis, '94, suffered from a second slight 
attack of the measles the first of last week which 
has necessitated his absence from recitations. 

— It you observe a particularly happy expression 
upon the face of any member of the senior class 
you may be sure he is one of the retiring editors of 
the Life. 

— The orchestra furnished music at a social dance 
in Hadley lasi Friday. They will assist at an enter- 
tainment to be held in the town hall next Friday 
evening. 

— President Gates of Amherst College delivered a 
ver\ interesting lecture in the Union course last 
Wednesday evening, upon the subject, "Patriotism 
in Times of Peace." 

— The Western Alumni Association will hold a 
meeting at Chicago next summer whenever the 
largest attendance of undergraduates and members 
of the faculty can be secured. 

— The following men from the Junior class have 
been appointed to compete for the Flint oratorical 
prizes next commencement : Averell, Curtis, Kirk- 
land, Merwin, Walker, White. 

— F. F. Gilman, Architect, 145 Main St., Fitch- 
burg, has been awarded the contract for making the 
plans and specifications as suggested by Prof. 
Brooks for the new stock-barn. 

— The seniors will be required to present military 
theses before May 1st. A first and second prize 
will be awarded the two best and these will be de- 
livered during the militarj' exercises of commence- 
ment week. 

— The collection of photographs of the college 
buildings that is to form a part of the exhibit at 
Chicago has been completed. The views, about 
thirty in number, are nearly all of them new, having 
been taken expressly for this purpose. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



139 



— The work on the tower in preparation for the 
new Signal Service arrangements has been necessa- 
rily delayed on account of the illness of Prof. 
Warner. The tall flag-staff has already been erected. 

—The local chapter of the Q. T. V. Fraternity 
held an informal reception in their rooms Saturday 
evening, March 4th, in honor of their resident grad- 
uates and local alumni. A good number were pres- 
ent and all enjoyed a very pleasant evening. 

— The seniors recently petitioned the faculty to 
give them the benefit of as many electives as pos- 
sible next term. The jietition was acted upon and 
it was decided to allow chemistry to be elected in 
place of any other branch except agriculture. 

— The retiring Aggie Life board will hold a ban- 
quet at the Amherst House tomorrow night. The 
tasty menus which have been printed indicate that 
the occasion will administer to the inner wants ot 
our hard worked editors in a satis^factory manner. 

— Preparations are being made for the establish- 
ment of an M. A. C. headquarters at Chicago next 
summer for the benefit of those members of the col- 
lege and alumni associations who will visit the Co- 
lumbian exposition. We understand that the mat- 
ter is in the hands of the Western Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 

— President Goodell, as a member of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Agricultural colleges and Ex- 
periment Stations, interviewed Secretary Morton 
and secured first, the retention of Mr. Willett as 
Assistant Secretary of Agriculture until he shall have 
completed the government exhibit at Chicago and 
second, that the new assistant secretary shall not 
be appointed until the above committee have pre- 
sented the claims of Maj. Henry E. Alvord. 

— March "2 the last entertainment of the Amherst 
College lecture course was held in College liall. The 
Hoston Leaders gave the conce.'t which proved to 
be all that was anticipated. The features of the 
evening were the harp solos by Mr. Henrich 
Schiiecker and the violin playing of Mr. DeS6ve. 
Both of these artists received repealed encores. 
The concert was well suited to close a season which 
has been characterized by the excellent quality of 
its entertainments. 

—The Washington Irving Literary Society held 
a special meeting Friday evening. The Glee Club 



furnished music, followed by a declamation by Hay- 
wood. Then followed a deliate contested by Hoyt, 
Lane, Howard, '93, and Potter. Roper delivered 
a declamation which closed the formal exercises of 
the evening. As this was the last meeting of the 
term, the announcement of the prizes offered earlier 
in the term, was made. Potter, '92, received first, 
and Roper, '96, second. 



UNAPPROPRIATED BLESSINGS. 

An eminent divine, refering at one time to old 
maids, euphemized his remarks by calling them 
"unappropriated blessings." His idea was that 
every woman, when married, became a blessing to 
her husband ; and that, if by chance a woman re- 
mained single, it was nothing against her ; she was 
simply "an unappropriated blessing." If we may 
judge from the complaints and criticisms which 
have appeared from time to time in this paper, there 
would seem to be here in our midst, three institu- 
tions v?hich might also be aptly called "unappropri- 
ated blessings," viz. : our library, our debating 
society and our college paper. Three institutions 
which, if we will but use them rightly, may be 
made invaluable to us ; but from which, owing to 
our present neglect, we are gaining comparatively 
nothing. 

It would doubtless be presumptuous for us to 
criticise this neglect too freely, but we feel bound 
to enter a protest against it, for by it we are losers, 
both as a college and as individuals. 

Our library, it is true, is not verj' extensive out- 
side the scientific department ; but it makes up in 
quality what it lacks in, quantity, and contains all 
the books necessary to make an ordinarily well read 
man. Of historical works there is an ample supply, 
and along this line, if no other, might we do some 
profitable work. It is to be regretted that the study 
of history does not find a place in our curriculum, 
but since it does not, we must read it for ourselves. 
We should do this because " history, rightly stud- 
ied, is of fundamental importance in the growth of 
the mental and moral nature." It is of special mo- 
ment in our country as a preparation for citizenship 
in a free self-governing nation. How can we appre- 
ciate what we enjoy unless we know how it came to 
to be ? This is only one of the ways in which our 
library might be a blessing to us. 



140 



AGGIE LIFK. 



Conceruing our debating society fuitlier com- 
plaint is superfluous. It stands anaong us a monu 
ment of neglect. Instead of the well attended and 
entbuiiastic meeliugs which we should have, we can 
find hardly men enough lor a quorum, and of nearly 
every meeting it is said, "it was characterized by 
small attendance and lack of interest." This is not 
the fault of the society or its officers, it is the fault 
of every man in college. The aiiility to speak read- 
ily and fluently cannot be prized too highl}', for 
such ability gives to its possessor power over his 
fellow-men and opens to him the road to honor and 
success. "True eloquence must be born with the 
man," but readiness and fluency of speech may be 
acquired by practice such as we might get in our 
society. This much might the society do for the 
individual; what would it do for the college' A 
strong and successful debasing society would do for 
us in the literary field what a strong and successful 
football team would do for us in athletics ; it 
would raise our standing among the other colleges. 
If through its influence we could produce from 
among our number men able to become successful 
participants in an intercollegiate debate, or alumni 
who might win forensic honors in our legislative 
halls, the gain to the college could not be overes- 
timated. 

Of our neglect to support our college paper, its 
editors have continually reminded us. Here the loss 
is three-fold ; to the individual, the paper, and the 
college. We are all losing most valuable practice, 
for although we do much class work in the way of 
writing, we do not obtain the l)enefit which we 
would obtain by writing for our college paper. We 
do not give the time and care to our essays and the- 
ses which we would give to the preparation of an 
article which we hoped to see in print, and which 
we knew would be unsparingly criticized. By writ- 
ing articles of this kind upon which we must con- 
centrate all our forces, we shall get valuable train- 
ing which we cannot get elsewhere. We all of us 
think good and great thoughts, all we lack is that 
power of expression which can be cultivated only 
by practice. Our paper is the loser ; for however 
able our board of editors may be, thej- must have 
the general support of the students if they would 
have the paper appear at its best. If they had a 
large number of contributions from which to select 



the matter for each issue, they would be sure of 
getting the best. As it is they are obliged to either 
take anything which comes to hand, or write the ar- 
ticles themselves. This latter course helps the 
paper, but it is more than we have a right to ask of 
them. Whatever is the loss of the paper is the loss 
of the college. Our paper goes into the reading 
rooms of other colleges and through the students 
and alumni it reaches many homes. The higher the 
standard of our paper the greater credit will it re- 
flect upon the college, and the .sooner will people be 
led to see us in our true light. 

Blaine in summing up his eulogy of Judge Black 
says: "He had attained unto every excellence of 
mental discipline described by Lord Bacon. Read- 
ing had made him a full man, talking a ready man, 
and writing an exact man." As much might be said 
of many others of our great men — great by virtue 
of the attainment of these excellencies. These 
three institutions of which we have spoken, offer 
opportunities for working toward the attainment of 
each of them. We must remember that with each 
of us rests the reputation of our college. Remem- 
bering this, let us make such use of our present op- 
portunities that in our future course in life, we may 
do credit not only to ourselves but to our beloved 
Alma Mater. 

R. L. H. 



THE CATALOGUE. 

The thirtieth annual report of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College was issued to the public Mon- 
day, March 13th. It shows that the past year has 
been undeniably one of unusual prosperity to the 
institution. 

The president's reports show that the whole num- 
ber of students enrolled during the past year is 190, 
the largest in the history of the institution. Since 
the entrance of the first class in 1867, nearly 900 
men have received instruction, not including those 
already in college. The whole number of gradu- 
ates who have received the degree of B. S. is 361 ; 
of these 348 are now living. 

The many improvements that have been made in 
the equipment are described ; and the demand for 
still greater facilities for instruction in some of the 
departments is presented. A full page photograph 
of the new Durfee Plant House forms the frontis- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



141 



piece to the pamphlet. Especial attention is given 
in the report to the work of the meteorological di- 
vision. The late addition of selt-recordiug instru- 
ments to the equipment of the tower is described ; 
also the plans that have been adopted for convert- 
ing the department into a U. S. Signal Station. 

The chief items of interest in the report are those 
regai'ding the new courses of study. It is an- 
nounced that the increased requirements for admis- 
sion will not go into effect until the examinations 
held in the summer of 1894. 

The pamphlet contains the usual reports from the 
different departments of the college, and of the va- 
nous divisions of th' Hatcli Experiment Station. 
Last year's entrance examination papers are in- 
cluded for the benefiL of those who intend to enter 
as students. The a[)pendix contains articles by 
Prof's Brooks, VVarner, Paige and Maynard. and by 
Pres. Goodell. The report will be sent free of 
charge to any address upon application to the 
President. 



Y. M. C. A. 



Mar. 16, 
Mar. 19, 
Apr. 6, 
Apr. 9, 



TOPICS. 

Ps. XXIII. 



H. L. 



He Leadeth Me. 
Frost. 

What Christ Expects of Us. John xv : 

16 ; Phil. i( : 1-16 E. O. Bagg. 
How to Become Strong Christians. I Cor. 

XVI : 13: Gal. vi : 1-10. A. E. Melendy. 
Praying for our Friends. Mark vii : 24-30. 

H. E. Clark. 



The roysterer tipples the juice of the maize, 
And soon gets as corned as a thief ; 

The fatting ox feeds on the grain of the same 
And then we hear of corned beef. 



HilUbus Icibus, 
No rubborum ; 

Feetibns slipplbus, 
Cocoanut sorum. 



GASTKONOMICS. 

"You look sweet enough to eat" 

I said to the maid "with eyes of blue ; 

She gazed at me with a wondering look 
And calmly replied "1 do." 



-Ex 



umni 



'78. — J. N. Hall, II. D., has removed his office to 
No. 780 Sixteenth St., Denver, Col. 

'82. — Councilman "W. C. Parker of Boston has 
recently undergone a dangerous surgical operation 
at the City Hospital. He is now convalescent. At 
a meeting of the Common Council, the announce- 
ment of the success of the operation was received 
with applause. 

'87. — At Peterboro, N. H., Feb. 14, a son was 
born to William H. Caldwell. 

'89. — Arthur L. Miles has been elected as an 
officer of the Rutland Creamery. 

'90. — David Barry is employed as Superintendent 
by the Amherst Gas Co. 

'92. — E. T. Clark visited the college last week. 
He is soon to take charge of a stock-farm at Lyn- 
don, Penn. 

'92. — F. H. Plumb is in charge of the horticultu- 
ral department of the Homestead Publishing Co. 



Schillare's 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



10s MAIN STBMET, - NOBTBASTPTOlf, MASS^ 



142 



AGGIE LIFE. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE ITE3IS. 

Massachusetts has the ouly state art normal 
school in the country. 

The Uuiversitj" of Michigan has fifty of its own 
graduates on the faculty. 

The law students of Boston University have de- 
cided to put a baseball team in the field. 

The current issue of the Harvard Monthly is a 
memorial number to the late Phillips Brooks. 

Mr. Rockefeller's gifts to Chicago University 
are the largest of any in the history of education. 

Seventy-five thousand medals and diplomas will 
be given away at the World's Fair next summer. 

The Yale Lit is the oldest college periodical in the 
U. S. and was founded by Hon. Wm. M. Evarts. 

The faculty of Brown have recently decided to 
raise the standard of marks from 50 to 60 per cent. 

Oberlin has the finest tennis field of any college. 
There are twenty-one courts occupying more than 
four acres. 

Lehigh has a senior society of much the same 
■order as Yale's Skull and Bones, called the Sword 
and Crescent. 

The students of the University of Blichigan meet 
every Saturday morning for the purpose of singing 
college songs. 

Amherst may send an expedition, under Prof. 
Todd, to South Africa in April to observe the 
■eclipse of the sun. 

The faculty of Kentucky University have sus- 
pended all college sports on account of alleged gam- 
bling among the students. 

A tract of 190 acres in Natick has been sold to 
a syndicate which intends to build a college for 
women, similar to Wellesley. 

An intercollegiate oratorical contest will take 
place at the Chicago fair, and the orations will have 
as their subject the Prohibition question. 

Leland Stanfard Jr. University will this year fol- 
low the lead of eastern universities in opening a 
summer school — the first of its kind on the Pacific 
coast. 

The students of Ann Arbor have been denied the 
right to vote. They elected their own men to run 
the town, consequently the state legislature sat 
upon them. 



H. D. HEMENWAY, 

DEALER IN 

Student Supplies, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, NOTE BOOKS, WHITE GLOVES, 

POCKET LENSES, STATIONERY, 

CHOICE CONFECTIONERY, 

FIGS, ETC. 

PRICES LOW. 

21 NORTH COLLEGE. 



SWIFT DOUBLE ACTION REVOLVER. 



5-shot 38 calibreV .--=^,'j'^~5j»'[ 
using 38 S. and W?l^"5 I^S-S 
C. F. cartridires 




Th3 Bsauty, Mitsrial anii I 
Worimanship Unoqualled. \>^ 
Tlw Mo-it I-i,pioved Double 

Action Revolver in the Market 

Price $10, by maii-, postpaid. 

the boston bull dog revolver s3 .25. 

the champion shot gun only $12. oo. 

for sale ey 

I. C. GREENE, 

BOX 386, - - - AMHERST. MASS. 

All corrcapoodence will receive prompt attention. 



STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 



ba U? B 



NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 

ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 

GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 

VIRST CLASS GOODS. FRICES LOW.' 

13 SOUTH COLLEGE. 



aivihErst college 

Co-OperatiYe Stain 

aiKl Carpet Renovatiii Eslalilisliiiieiit. 

Aggie Agent, C. L BROWN, '94. 



* 






Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



1 43 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 



yyl 



Lamps and Lamp iioofis are Oors." 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMBERST, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED i SALE STABLE, 

T. L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



DEALER IN 



WBTGHES, CIiOGliS, JEWEIiRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

FIHE BTaTiaHERY. 
REPAiRlMS hlEATLY A13 ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



H, 0. PEfig 



H 




.A-OVCHEPIST, 



3Vn.A.SS. 



To the rustic a stump is tlie stub of a tree. 

To tlie small boy defiance it breathes ; 

The rostrum's a stump in the laud of the free, 

And often one's walking stumping will be, 

If he's stirring his stumps ■ne;ith the trees. 

When one runs on these meanings all in a lump 

And seelis for the right one ; why, he's up a stump. 



Her eyes were depths of hazel. 

Her form embodied grace. 
Her lips a half -blown rose bud 

'Mid the dimples of her face. 

Though he would fain have snatched a kiss, 

He could not reach, I ween. 
For she was a city damsel 

And — her skirt was crinoline. 



Where is the man who has not said 
At evening when he went to bed, 
"I'll waken with the crowing cock, 
And get to work by five o'clock." 

Where is the man who rather late 
Crawls out of his bed at quarter of eight, 
That has not thought with fond regard 
'"Tis better not to work too hard." 



NOTICES. 

Mails leave the college for the post-office at 1 p. m. and 
7-40 p. M. on week days. On Sundays it leaves at 4-45 p.m. 

At the post-office mails leave as follows : Boston, 7-45, 
8-30, 10-45 A. M. 4-00, 6-45, 8-30 P. M. 

Springfield, New York, Washington, Southern and 
Western states, 7-45, 10-45, a. m. 4.00, 6-45, 8-30 p. M. 

Worcester, Providence, Eastern and Western Massa- 
chusetts, 7-45, 10 45, A. M. 4 00, 6-45 p. m. 

Fitchburg, North Adams and the North, 8-30, 10-45 a. 
M. 4-00, 6 45 P. M. 

Northampton and Holyoke, 10-45 a. m. 6 45, 8-30 P. M. 

Palmer and New London, 11-45 a. m. 4-00, 8-30 p. M. 

The President will l>e at his oflice from 2 to 4 
every afternoon except Saturdays and Sundays. 

The treasurer will be at liis office from 3 to 5 
p. M. on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout 
the term. 

The Museum of Natural Hislorj- will be open to 
visitors on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and 
Fridays from 2-45 to 3-45 p. m. 

The college library will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
also from 8 to 12 a. m. and from 1 to 4 p. ii., and 
on Sunday from 12 to 3 p. m. only. 



144 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LAEGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes I Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 
"WT-ILLI-A-IVIS' block;. 



Sheet Mlusic, 



Miasic Books, 



Strings 

FOR the: violin, banjo, aUITAR, 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 



,.« DENTISTS. J., 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTIN^GTON, D. D. S. 

CUTLXIR'S SLOCK, ^LMBERST, MASS. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONEECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



FHYSICIANS' PJCBSCRIPTION8 CAB.MFVLI>T 
COMPOUNDED, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PH.4RMACY, 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your COiL£ here. 



WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUAKTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



LOBGETT k CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
9 A.. IsO:. TO 5 F. 3VI. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



Far Suits and. Fall DvercQats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 

FINE ITAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

0= G= COUCM & SON'S. 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pakiseau, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amhekst, Mass. 

office op 
EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst^ Mast. 



JLJ- \^ 



ih 



H 



FREBH KNB TINIB. 



EUEL'S DRUG STORE, 

Aoitierst House Block, - Ainiierst, llass. 



HENRY J^UJ^MS, 

:E=:Ea:^^:E^3\d:.^cis'X'.. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Driios and Medici iies, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, I!\IPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC.. 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for I'istols, and Spcirtiiig and Spvingfleld Killes. 

Sundar and night calls responded to at residen'ie, flrst door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1S50. 






1892. 



T HE PH aTaERJI.FHER. 

NEW SKY l_IGH-r. 

:ni_arge:d operating room. 



€LASS AN5) SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY. 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



5. g. DI(?HI(5P0!:^, B. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 P. M. 



J@^Etlier and Nitrons Oxide Gas administered when 
desired . 



A-T THE 



AMHERST GASH SHGEc STQREi 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AlIHERST, MASS. 



'\T 



/ 



4T A I LO R. 



'1 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



jWiiitapy Suits and Trimmings. 



Massachusetts Aaricultural Colle 





^ 



.-^ 



ja. 



c . ^/ 



'^-^-^^^cU^ 





GrIE LI 





^MHERBT, MABB., iLPRIL 19, 1EB3. 



YOL. in. 



ITd. 13. 



*eR1MTERS,* 

AMHERST, - - MASS. 


C. H. SANDERSOfi k CO., 

CASH DEALERS IN 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 

CASH ROW, - ■ - AMHERST. 


MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We wonld inform the friends of tlie college, and the 
public generallj-, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fi-uits, address, 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS. 


S/NDE[|S0H k Thompson. 

CASH DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 

AMHERST, - , MASS. 






THE AIHHEeST 


BOOTS an:d sho:e:s 

FOR EVERYBODY. 




m CARPET 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEA DS, .MATTR ESSES, ^P 

DESKS AND_CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 

WINDOW SIIADES, DRAPERIE S. 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 

AU Goods STUICTIsY CASH and at 
LOWEST FK.ICES. 

E. D. MARSH, 

10 PHCENIX ROW, - AMHERST, MASS. 



A FLN'E LINE OP STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

I=XTSBEI3 O-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



T. -V\^. SLOAN, 

2 FStEJflX MOW. 



?MAdi\ Blamber, 



GAS F8TTER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heatiiis a Specialty. 



y"!^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., APRIL 19. 1893. 



No. 13 



4iJi 11 £ 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF EDITORS : 

C. F. WALKER, '94, Editor-in-chief. 

G. H. .MERWIN, 'i)4, Business Manager. 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

F. L. GREENE, '94, T. P. FOLEY, '95, 

E. O. BAGG, '95, C. B. LANE, '95, 

R. L. H-4YWARD, '96. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



^l,9.?U\"\^^ tJ. M,6UtV.Cl\i^t^ ?^\\V-^t^^. 



Students and alumni are requested to contribute. Com- 
muuications should be addressed Aggie Life, Amherst, 
Mass. 



With the present issue the Life passes under a 
new management. The editors acknowledge their 
indebtedness to the members of the retiring board, 
and to the college in general, for the present flour- 
ishing condition of the paper. The ensuing 3'ear 
promises to be one of unusual prosperity to the 
college ; the duties devolving on the college paper 
will therefore be largely increased. That Aggie 
Life may continue to contribute to the highest wel- 
fare of the iustitution it represents, we solicit from 
the officers, alumni and students of the college the 
same earnest support ihey have given in the past. 



Will members of the alumni associations please 
take especial pains during the present term to keep 
us informed of all changes in ;vddrcss or occupation 
of graduates of the college ? We wish to make the 
Alumni Department of the .paper a reliable source 
of information, and this can on!}' be accomplished 
through the efforts of the alnmni themselves. 



Articles for publication or any items of 
the college will be thankfully received. 



interest to 



A WORD regarding the competition for positions 
on next year's Life board may not be out of place 
in this issue. We shall not require from candidates 
a prescribed amount of work but we wish to have it 
understood that the contest commences at once for 
members of the present freshmen and sophomore 
classes. Those who wish to hold positions on 
the ne.'ct board should not wait until the last half of 
the winter term before making their purpose known. 
One or two articles each term, carefully prepared 
and submitted for publication, will count more in 
the end than twice as many such articles handerl in 
just before the election. Please bear this in mind. 



The department in Action of the college library 
has lately been increased by the addition of the gift 
of Mr. William B. Court. This gift consists of 
over sixty volumes of the works of the standard 
writers of fiction. It contains complete sets of W. 
D.Howells and E. P. Roe's works. Elizabeth Stuart 
Phelps, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Edward Eggleston 
and Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe are also repre- 
sented. This is a move in the right direction. This 
department of the library has not kept pace with 
the increase which has been steadily going on in 
many of the other departments and this gift will 
serve to some extent to offset the inequality. The 
way the department has been called upon of late is 
good evidence that the gift is used and appreciated. 
The reading of scientific books may be instructive 
but it is not always interesting and standard fiction 
may occasionally be indulged in with good effects. 



The candidates for the base-ball team, having 
commenced practicing in the gym. early in the 
winter, are now in good condition to commence the 
season's work. The gymnasium is large enough 
for the winter work of the team, but its dusty con- 



146 



AGGIE LIFE. 



dition is very detrimental, and it is with a feeling of 
relief that outdoor practice is resumed. The 
campus is in Hue condition. The financial con- 
dition given by the student body has enabled the 
management to secure the services of a trainer 
who has spent the past weel< in getting the indi- 
vidual players in good condition. He has directed 
his atteution largely to work at the bat, and the 
improvement he has brought about has been 
very marked. There seems to be no reason 
why this year's season should not be a surcessful 
one ; we have excellent material, the men have 
trained faithfully, the management has secured a 
good number of games and the college has given 
the required financial support. All that now 
remains is for each student iu coUeue to atiend the 
games and give his personal support to the team. 



The approaching field-day should develop some 
new records for this college as it certainly has 
developed the men who are capable of breaking 
many of our old ones. This they should endeavor 
to do. At this season of the year base-bali demands 
a considerable amount of the time and attention of 
the students. But we must not allow this to usurp 
all other sports. This is to be the first field-day held 
here for many years and each class should strive to 
win the class championship and banner and by so 
doing to make better records for the college. This 
is the first banner ever offered here for competition 
in a series of athletic contests and judging from the 
efforts put forth by the classes at the meets of last 
term it is evident that the winning class will have 
to exert itself m order to be victorious. Already a 
number of men have commenced training and the 
number should be greatly increased during the 
coming week. Let all interest themselves in this 
and show the directors of the athletic association 
that their efforts are appreciated by making this 
coming field-day so successful that we may look 
for one each succeeding year. 



It has sometimes been said that our college needs 
a school in which our students should receive spec- 
ial preparation for entrance, but the fact that we 
already have, not one, but many schools which fur- 
nish just the preparation needed is often over- 
looked. The majority of towns in our state sup- 



port high schools. These, though differing widely 
in grade and efficiency, are the natural preparatory 
schools for the M. A. C. In our present system of 
public instructiou, they form the connecting link 
between the grammar schools and those higher 
institutions, such as the Normal Schools, the Tech- 
nical Institutes and the Agricultural College, which 
are maintained either wholly, or in part, by the 
state. Any graduate of a high school should be 
able to meet our requirements for entrance, without 
conditions. His training in the high school will 
enable him to better appreciate and take advantage 
of the opportunities here offered. When the objects, 
means, and advantages of this college are better 
understood by high school scholars and graduates, 
and our entering classes contain a larger per cent, 
of the latter, then much will have been done toward 
raising and maintaining a still higher standard of 
scholarship. 



The controversy in the Conn, legislature as to 
whetiier the Federal grant of 1890, soon to be S25,- 
000 a year, should be given to Storrs Agricultural 
School or Yale College is- practically ended. The 
granges of the state, acting in a body, have been en- 
thusiastic in upholding the interests of the farmers 
during the struggle, and their untiring efTorts 
have finally been crowned with success. The bill 
in favor of the school passed the House of Repre- 
sentatives by a vote of 135 to 31, and the Senate, 
by a vote of "20 to 2. It is not probable that the 
governor of the state will veto the bill which has 
passed both houses by such overwhelming majori- 
ties. The dispute as to which institution should 
receive this fund is but a repetition of the struggle 
which has occurred in various states of the Union, 
our own not excepted. This fund has been and is 
still being received by institutions, which. claim to 
fulfil all the required conditions of the Morrill Bill, 
when in reality only such conditions are observed as 
will allow them to draw upon this government 
money. As a consequence, agricultural education 
is suffering iu many of the states. But the time is 
coming when this matter must be settled aright, 
and the money used for the purpose for which it 
was intended. Our sister state has set a good 
example by its recent decision, and the farmers of 
the state are to be congratulated upon their success. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



147 



f^s i'tfm|. 



A NEW ATTRACTION. 

As one approaches the DuitVe plant house from 
the soiitberu side the first thing Ihat attracts his at- 
tention is the tower arising between the two octa- 
gons. From its position so much nearer the larger 
of the octagons, it is evident that it was not pur- 
posed as a part of the building in the original design. 
Closer inspection proves its temporary nature and 
arouses wonder as to its object. But a glance at the 
wonderful plant beneath its shade satisfies the in- 
quirer that it is even more useful than ornamental. 

After living and storing up its strength for over 
fifty years, the century plant is preparing for its 
final effort, the transmuting of its stored up nourish- 
ment into a mighty blossom ; this done, it will have 
attained its life purpose and will die. Already the 
rapid growth of the bud shows the need of the tower 
as its protection from tlie vicissitudes of our New 
England climate. 

This specimen is pronounced, by those who are 

competent to judge, one of the largest and most 

perfect of its class ever seen outside of its native 

clime. It is supposed to be about fifty-three years 

old and was started by Pres't Hitchcock of Amherst 

College. It has been on these grounds ever since 

1867. 
Some four weeks ago the bud was first discovered ; 

since then it has grown about eight feet in spite of 

being kept cold to retard its growth. The blossom 

stalk is expected to reach a height of from twenty 

to thirty feet. The flowers will be two or three 

inches in length, on very short pedicels, and glo- 

bosely clustered. Their color is a yellowish green. 

The species to which it belongs is known as 
Agave Americana. It is indigenous in South Amer- 
ica and was discovered in 1640. Its common name 
was derived from the erroneous idea that it blossoms 
only after a century's growth. 

Already the news of its budding has attracted 
many visitors to the plant-house, and when it is in 
full bloom they will come from far and near to 
behold the marvelous plant. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION NOTICE. 
With such success as the college has lately 
attained in both base-ball and foot-ball, and with 
the success of our weekly indoor meets the past win- 



ter, it seems as a matter of course that more should 
be done toward raising the standard of our outdoor 
and track athletics. In no other wa}- can this be 
better accomplished than by the establishment of an 
annual field day. And so notwithstanding the fact 
that the spring term is a very busy one in all 
respects for college students, after due considera- 
tion it has been deemed advisable that this year 
should be the one to witness the foundation of such 
a custom. This is with the hope that each succeed- 
ing spring we shall see this same movement carried 
out, and with increasing results for the better. 

In order that our first Field Day ma}' be a suc- 
cess, the support of every man in college is needed, 
either in practicing himself or by inspiring others in 
his own class to do so. With the men of each class 
lies the responsibility of winning the banner. 

The time and place of holding our nest meet has 
not yet been fully decided upon, but it is hoped that 
it can be held on Hampshire Park, on Wednesday, 
May 17. In case we do not succeed in obtaining 
that date and place, it will be held on our own 
grounds the Saturday previous. By the next issue 
of the Life, however, we hope to be able to explain 
more fully and in detail, and to give the exact date 
on which the names of all those who wish to compete 
must be handed in. After this date no new names 
can be entered as printed programs are to be gotten 
out and circulated among members of the college. 

The following is the list of events :— Throwing 
the hammer, putting the shot (IGlbs. ), hurdle 
racing, running hop, step and jump, pole vault, 
100-yard dash, 220-yard dash, half-mile run, mile 
run, relay race, standing high jump, running high 
jump, standing broad jump, running broad jump 
and mile walk. There will also be a mile bicycle 
race if we succeed in obtaining Hampshire Park. 
Competent judges will be obtained and the points 
will count the same as in the Drill Hall, the events 
indoors counting 50% and the Field Day counting 
50%. The class obtaining the highest per cent, 
will win the banner. 

Per order Athletic Association. 

H. C. Davis, Pres't. 

L. Manlet, Sec. and Treas. 



BASEBALL CRITICISM. 
The candidates for the team have been in active 
training since the beginning of last term and have 



148 



AGGIE LIFE. 



now become pretty well sifted down so that the 
makeup of the team is for the most part settled. 
The men have worked hard and are now putting 
more spirit and time into practice than is usual in 
an M. A. C. nine. 

W. J. Curley, '96, is the successful candidate Cor 
catcher's position. The place is a little novel to 
him yet, but he is a good thrower, a sure hitter and 
will uudoul)tedly develop into a good.reliable man. 

H. B. Read, '95, is doing the pitching. He has 
good speed and curves, is cool-headed and although 
a trifle wild as yet, will prove a good pitcher. 

Baag, '95, covers first in good shape. He is a 
good batter, and can also play behind the bat if 
necessary. 

Clark, '95, is playing well at second and works 
faithfully in practice. He bats well and will 
undoubtedly keep up his reputation of last year. 

Read, '96, is a "liud" at short. This was his old 
position in Wesleyan Academy. He understands 
the place thoroughly, and plays the game for all 
there is in it. He is a winner from start to finish. 

Day, '96, covers third ver}' creditably. Ho fields 
well but is QOt a sure hitter as yet. Still he is 
improving and will be a gooti man. 

Sullivan, '95, Howard, '94, Curley, '93, Jones, '95, 
and Marshall, '96, are the candidates for the out- 
field. The former three, having had last year's 
experience will probably play, although Jones and 
Marshall are sure fielders. The men as a whole 
field their respective positions well but they lack in 
team work and do not play together as nicely as 
they should. The battery is weak as a whole and 
great improvement must be made in this line if 
games are to be won. The college has given 
splendid financial support and now let there be man- 
ifested equal support in good M. A. C. enthusiasm, 
as the hard work of the boys deserves it. They are 
going in to win. 



AGGIE LIFE BANQUET. 

The banquet of the retiriug board of Aggie Life 
editors was held at the Amherst House on the 
evening of March 17th. All members of the bonrd 
were present and each professed himself as fully 
prepared to meet the urgent demands of the occa- 
sion. 

The banquet was complete in every detail and 



every one did ample justice to the repast; then all 
turned their attention to those intellectual pastimes 
so eminently fitting for a board of Life editors. 
Ex-editor-in-chief Curley, acting as toast-master, 
called upon all the members, who responded ably 
and characteristically. The business manager in- 
creased the general good feeling by giving a state- 
ment of the present greatly improved financial con- 
dition ot the paper as compared with that of a year 
ago ; others followed with hits of fact or fancy as 
their taste inclined. Some spoke of the past history 
and future possibilities of the paper ; others consid- 
ered its pre,sent standing in the college and among 
college journals. That the Life has become an 
essential and established leature of our Alma Mater, 
tliauks to the class of '91, was conceded by all. 

The alumni and exchange editors vied with each 
other in extolling their departments while another 
member called attention to the fact that the toast- 
master, who was a rnember of the pioneer board, 
was the last undergraduate able to claim that honor. 
The party dispersed at a late hour, all expressing 
themselves as fully repaid by the pleasures of the 
occasion and the benefits they had derived from the 
editorial work. 



WEATHER BUREAU REPORTS. 

The arrangements for displaying weather signals 
at the observatory have at last been completed. 
The forecasts are received each morning at 8.00 
o'clock b\' telegraph, and the flags are displayed 
(rom the tower as soon as the messages are received 
at the college. The Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany will connect the observatory with the central 
office as soon as possible ; until this work can be 
accomplished there will necessarily be a delay 
in displaying the flags. The forecasts are for 
twenty-four hours from the tini(^ tliey are issued. 

The following are the signals used : 

White flag alone, fair weather, stationary tempe- 
rature. 

Blue flag alone, rain or snow, stationary tempera- 
ture. 

Blue and white flag alone, local rain, stationary 
temperature. 

While flag with black triangle above, fair weather, 
warmer. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



149 



White flag with black triangle below, fair weather, 
colder. 

Blue flag with black triangle above, rain or snow, 
warmer weather. 

Blue flag with lilack triangle below, rain or snow, 
colder weather. 

Blue and white flag with black triangle above, 
warmer weather with local rains. 

Blue and white flag with black triangle below, 
colder weather with local rains. 

White flag with flag below iiearing black square 
on white ground, fair weather, cold wave. 

Blue flag with flag below bearing black square on 
white ground, wet weather, cold wave. 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE. 

Manager Goodrich has announced the following 
list of games already arranged. Others will be an- 
nounced later. 
April 22 — Mt. Herinon, at Amherst. 

" 29 — Worcester Tech., at Worcester. 
May 6 — Trinity, at Hartford. 

" 20 — Williston, at E;tsthampton. 

" 27 — Trinity, at Amherst. 

" 31 — Williston, at Amherst. 

Mr. E. H. Lehnert will officiate as umpire the 
coming season, and the scorer will be chosen after 
the first game. 



April 



Luke XV ; 
23— The Living Water. 



Y. M. G. A. TOPICS. 
April 20 — The Joy of Bringing Others to Christ. 

1-10. H. D. Clark. 
John IV : 13, 14. 

Shiro Kuroda. 
April 27 — Looking unto Jesus. John i : 29-36. 

E. H. Henderson. 
April 30 — Making the Best of Circumstances. 

Acts xsvii : 43, 44 ; Phil, iv : 11-13. 

R. A. Cooley. 



HIAWATHA'S MITTENS. 

He has slain tlie Mucljekievis, 
Of Ms skin he made him mittens, 
Made them with the warm side inside, 
Made them with the cold side outside, 
He, to get the warm side inside 
Tvirned the inside skinside outside, 
Thus he turned them inside outside. 



BASE BALL. 
Worcester Tech., 7 ; M. A. C, 3. 
Tlif baseball season was opened at Aggie Satur- 
day, April 1.0th, with a very exciting and interesting 
game with the Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
nine. The result was the defeat of the college 
team by a score of 7 to 3, but despite this, a 
stronger game has seldom been put up by an 
M. A. C. team upon the college campus. The game 
was won by " Tech " in the sixth inning, because 
of a costly passed ball and three hits with a total of 
four. The features were the team work of both 
nines. The batting of Technology was the most 
effective, coming at critical points. Fine running 
catches were made by Capt. Curley and Knowles. 
Clark look in a very difficult line hit. Read, the 
new Aggie pitcher, was very effective and well sup- 
ported by W. Curley. The work of Read at short- 
stop and of Clark at second base was of high order. 
The score : 



Gallagber, rf, 
Fhilpot, c, 
Zaeder, lb, 
Gordon, cf, (Capt.) 
Howe, If, 
Perkins, 2b, 
H.aiTis, 3b, 
Knowles, ss, 
Abbott, p, 



TECHNOLOGT. 
A B K 
3 1 
3 



IB TB SH PO 



Total, 


29 
M. A. 


7 


5 


6 


2 


27 


17 


3 




A B 


E 


IB 


T B 


S H 


PO 


A 


E 


Bagg, lb, 


5 


■ 











13 








W. J. Curley, c, 


5 





1 


1 





4 


1 


1 


Clark, 2b, 


4 





2 


2 





2 


1 





Curley, It, (Capt.) 


3 











1 


o 


1 





F. S. Howard, o f , 


3 


1 


1 


1 








( 





Day, 3b, 


3 





1 


3 





2 





1 


Sullivan, r f, 


3 





1 


1 














F. H. Read, ss. 


2 


"2 











1 


5 


1 


H. B. Read, p, 


4 





1 


1 


2 





6 






Total, 32 3 7 9 3 24 14 3 

Innings, 123456789 

"Tech," 10100401 — 7 

JI. A. C, 110 10 0—3 

Stolen bases— Clark 2, Howard 2, Harris 3, Gallaglier 3, Fhilpot, 

Gordon, Bagg, W. J. Curley, F. H. Read. Two-base hit— Howe. 

Three-base hit— Day. First base on balls— Tech. 4, II. A. C. 5. 

Sti'uck out— Bagg 2, Perkins, Knowles, Harris. Batter hit — Abbott. 

Double plays — G. Curley to Clark, Knowles to Perkins. Passed 

balls— W. J. Curley> Philpot 2. Umpires— Lehuert and Stone. 

Scorer— Keith. Time— Ih. gsm. 



The Willistonian says that the Sigma Chi pin that 
Pres't Cleveland wore during the inauguration cere- 
monies is valued at $500. 



150 



AGGIE LIFE. 



8-15 A. 
8-30 A. 



A. M. 
8-30. 



SCHEDULE. 

GENERAL EXERCISES. 

Chapel. 1 10-30 A. M., Church, Sunday. 

Inspection of Rooms, Sat. I 4-15 p. M., Drill, M. T. Th. 

CLASS EXERCISES. 

SENIOR. JUNIOR. 

Constitutional History. English, M. F. 



9-30. Veterinary Science. 



10-30. 
11-30. 



p. M, 
1-45- 

2-45. 

A. M. 
8-30. 
9-30. 

10-30. 

11-30- 

p. M. 
1-45. 

2-45. 



Agriculture, M. T. W. 
English, M. F. 
Chemistry, T. W. Th. 



Military Science, M. 
SOPHOMORE. 

Agriculture. 
English, M. F. 
French, T. W. Th. 
Surveying 



Chemistry, T. W. Th. 
Landscape Gardening, M. T. F. 
Chemistry, W. Th. 
Entomology, M. T. W. Th. 
Physics, first half term. 
Entomology, second half term, 

M. T. W. Th. 

Landscape Gardening, Th. 
Landscape Gardening, Th. 
FRESHMAN. 

Geometry, M. T. W. F. 
Agriculture, M. T. W. F. 
English, Th. 
Botany, M. W. Th. F. 
English, T. 



Surveying,second half term. Latin. M. T. Th. F. 

Horticulture, M. T. \V. 
Horticulture, M. T. 



— Electives at last. 

— Whc> suspended Mand? 

— Beware of the book-agent ! 

TT-Japanese kite-flying is a fine art. 

— Sellew, '96, is correspondent for the ;S'priwg';?eZd 
Union. 

— There are now over 13,700 books in the college 
library. 

— The first outdoor drill of the year was held 
April 4. 

— Rev. J. B. Ward of Lynn visited the college 
last week. 

— TheD.G.K. house has lately been photographed 
by Lovell. 

— The drill for Tuesday, April 11, was held Fri- 
day, April 7. 

— The work on soil analysis at the laboratory has 
been completed. 

Mt. Hermon next Saturday.- There must be a 
good attendance. 

— The first signal flag was displayed from the 
observatory April 5. 



— Canvas canoes attracted considerable attention 
on the pond last week. 

— The lower portion of the walls in Prof. Brooks' 
room have been sheathed. 

--Is It not most time for another fire-drill — one 
of those unexpected ones? 

— Prof. C. S. Walker and family were in Darien, 
Conn, during the vacation. 

— Hayward, '96, was suddenly called home at the 
commencement of the term. 

— The reading room association has enlarged the 
space devoted to newspapers. 

— Fletcher Dobyns of Oberlin lectures on Prohi- 
bition at College Hall to-night. 

— The Amherst Heavy G3m. Ex. attracted the 
usual amount of attention March 22. 

— The trustees of the Hatch Experiment Station 
held a meeting the first day of April. 

— The farm department has been at work improv- 
ing the roads on the college grounds. 

— A handbook of the college will be issued by the 
Y. M. C. A. at the close of the term. 

— The man who has the money with him is popu- 
lar with the baseball mrmageinect just now. 

— Ninety-one and Ninety-two will play the college 
team sometime during commencement week. 

— Thomas -J. Niland of the Lynn team has been 
training the college nine during the past week. 

— An unusually large number of students were 
detained by sickness at the beginning of the term. 

— Mr. F. F. Gilman, the architect for the new 
college buildings, has been in town the past week. 

— Profs. Mohler and Sanford of Wesleyan A(3ad- 
emy visited the college the latter part of last term. 

— April 10. the artillery, sabre and bayonet squads 
and the college band were photographed by Lovell. 

— Where is the Natural History Society ? This 
warm weather should make them come out of their 
holes. 

— At a meeting of the Y. M. C. A. April 6, the 
following officers were elected for the ensuing year : 
president, G.H. Merwin, '94; vice-president, A. J. 
Morse, '94 ; corresponding secretary, R. A. Cooley, 
'95 ; recording secretary, B.K.Jones, '96 ; treasurer, 
H. L. Frost. '95. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



151 



— That new flag is a beauty. 

— Now for one or two brand new yells. 

— April 6, Fast day. No college exercises. 

— Saturday's game was exciting to say the least. 

— The Meteorological bulletin for March records 
thunder and lightning the night of the 14tli of that 
month. 

— April 9, Rev. E. W. Gay lord of North Amherst 
occupied the college puipit in exchange with Dr. 
Walker. 

—F. T. Harlow, '93, H. G. Stockweli, '94, C. L. 
Stevens, '95, and H. H. Roper, '96 have not yet 
returned. 

— The money remaining in the treasury of the 
Republican club has been donated to the athletic 
association. 

— Ten demerits now instead of five for uuexcused 
absences from military drill. The way of the trans- 
gressor is hard. 

— E. D. White, '94, is compelled to use crutches 
as a result of a bad sprain received in the gymna- 
sium last term. 

— The Board of Control of the State Experiment 
Station held a meeting last week. Their report for 
1892 has just been issued. 

— Bulletin No. 21, published by the Hatch Experi- 
ment Station, was issued Apiil 13. It was devoted 
to the Horticultural department. 

— The Ninety-five Index board was photographed 
last Wednesday. The photograph will form a part 
of the college exhibit at Chicago. 

— At a meeting of the Conn. Valley Economic 
Association held at Springfield March 29, Prof.O.S. 
Walker was re-elected president of the organization. 

— Through the courtesy of the Secretary of the 
State Board of Agriculture, 200 copies of the annual 
report have been given to the President for 
distribution. 

— F. S. Hoyt, '93, represented the college Y. M. 
C. A. at the conference of the Eighth District, held 
atMonson, Mass., April 14-16. He spoke on 
"College Work." 

— A valuable St. Bernard dog was seriously 
injured last Thursday by breaking through the glass 
at the plant house. The animal was the property 
of Prof. Neill of Amherst college. 



— The usual baseball subscriptions were taken 
April 10. A little over three hundred dollars was 
raised among the students present, a sum that is 
very satisfactory to the association. 

— The orchestia furnished music at the ball given 
by A. X. Petit to his classes in dancing at the Town 
Hall, April 5. Those who were present from the 
college report a very enjoyable time. 

— The Ninety-four Index board held a class 
auction sale on Friday of the cuts that appeared in 
the publication. The bidding was quite livelj-, 
esj ecially when the half-tones were put up. 

— A final examination in the separation of bases 
was given ilie Junior class is the chemical laboratory 
April 11, closing the work of last term. The sub- 
ject will be continued during the present term. 

— A youngster with a miud for investigation was 
recently found emptying the water out of the raiu 
guage on the campus, sadly upsetting thereby the 
calculations of the meteorological department. 

— -The century plant has continued to grow during 
the past t.vo weeks and the indications are that it 
will not fail to accomplish all that is expected of it. 
The curiosity is viewed every day by many inter- 
ested visitors. 

—At a meeting held March 15, Ninety-six elected 
the following officers : President, W. J. Curley ; 
vice-president, H. W. Rawson ; secretary, C. A. 
Nutting; treasurer, J. E. Green ; sergeant-at-arms, 
W. B. Dodge. 

— Lewis, '94, Lane, '95, White, '96, Root, '95, 
Ballon, '95, and Kramer, '96, have obtained leave 
of absence for the term. They will start for Chicago 
April 29, where they will enter the service of the 
World's Fair Commission. 

— Extensive improvements have been made at the 
plant house during the vacation. The disorder 
occasioned by the work of reconstruction has been 
remedied and now the grounds are fast assuming 
their usual attractive appearance. 

— President Goodell delivered his lecture on"Life 
in the East," in the Union course, March 15, before 
a large and appreciative audience. Having spent 
his early life in Constantinople, his lecture was full 
of pleasing reminiscences. His portrayal of the 
manners and customs of the people, illustrated by 
many humorous anecdotes, was full of interest. 



152 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The botany can is again on deck. 

— Junior Flint orations are due May 1 . 

— Out on the diamond now, everybody ! 

— Mr. Thomas Canavan has been quite ill. 

— The Weekly Review is now in the reading room. 

— Corporal Higgins has been transferred to the 
band. 

— President Goodell was in Washington during 
the vacation. 

— Military and graduation theses from the Seniors 
are due May 1. 

— H. G. Stockwell,'91,is seriously ill at his home 
in Sutton, Mass. 

— It is reported that improvements will soon be 
made around the pond. 

— A photograph of the last Life board will soon 
be placed in the library. 

— The Freshman class was entertained by Prof, 
and Mrs. Maynard last Friday evening. 

—The fire alarm Thursday night caused the usual 
amount of excitement in the dormitories. 

— A special examination in last term's work was 
held in the English department, April 17. 

— The attempt to continue the singing school this 
term proved a failure owing to lack of interest. 

— Bleetings at Amherst Grange, No. 16, will be 
held this term as follows : April 21, May 5, May 19, 
June 2, June 16. 

— T. S. Bacon, '94, will have charge of the alumni 
department of the Life and T. F. Keith, '94, will 
look after the exchanges. 

— l wo hard thunder storms and a blizzard fol- 
lowed close after the appearance of the tirst flag on 
the observatory. Good work I 

— A quartette from the glee club furnished music 
at the meeting of the Connecticut Valley District 
Grange held in Amherst March 15. 

— The storm flag that has done service during the 
•winter has been replaced by a new flag which will 
be displayed throughout the term during pleasant 
weather. 

— Battalion drill will be held on the parade ground 
every pleasant drill day at which the entire corps 
must be present. Considerable attention will be given 
to instruction in ceremonies. 



— June 18 is Commc'ncement Sunday. 

— Owing to the spirit of malicious mischief pos- 
sessed by some members of the college, it ivas nec- 
essary to lower the top .mast of the flag staff last 
week to replace the halyards. C<j. D was detailed 
for the work. 

— A conference of the presidents of the college 
y. M. C. A. organizations of New England will be 
held with I he Harvard association at Cambridge, 
April 20-23. This ;issociation will be represented 
by the president and vice-president. 

— The report of the Twentieth Annual Session of 
Mass. State Grange of which Elmer D. Howe, M. 
A. C., '81, is Master, has lately been issued. It 
contains an interesting report on the college by the 
committee appointed for the purpose. 

— Baseball excitement must not interfere with 
regular out door practice by those who intend to 
enter the athletic contest on Field Day. The interest 
taken in athletics last term shows that the efforts of 
the association can be well supported by the student 
body. 

— The class of Ninety-five has elected the fol- 
lowing officers for the term : president, Jasper 
Marsh ; vice-president, H. D. Hemenway ; secretary, 
C. W. Crehore ; captain, H. B. Read ; base-ball 
captain, E. H. Clark; athletic captain, E. O. Bagg ; 
historian, A. F. Mason. 

— Thosp who have the interests of the new athletic 
field in charge have issued a circular letter to the 
alumni and former students calling for funds. 
Replies are coming in slowly but surely and the indi- 
cations are that the former students are taking a 
deep interest in the matter. 

— The twentieth volume of the Boston University 
Year Book has lately been issued. It shows that 
the steady growth of the institution has been unin- 
terrupted. There are 1075 students now in atten- 
dance, a number larger than that of any previous 
year. Editorial refeience is made to the recent 
changes in the Mass. Agricultural College, the"Col- 
lege of Agriculture" of the University. Pres. 
Warren's Opening Day address entitled, "Collegiate 
Life" is printed in full. The discourse was deliv- 
ered before the College of Liberal Arts last Septem- 
ber, and is of great interest to college men. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



153 



— If a siiflacieut number of students desire it, Mr. 
Petit will continue his dancing class during the 
present term. The class will meet at the college 
instead of down town as heretofore. Those interested 
in the matter are requested to notify Cutter, '94. 

— Ninety-four has organized for the term as fol- 
lows : president, A.J. Morse; vice president. G. 
H. Merwin ; secretary, L. Manley ; treasurer, C.H. 
Spaulding ; Captain, E. L. Boardman ; sergeant-at- 
arms, T. 8. Bacon ; baseball captain, S. F. Howard. 

— The following committees of the Y. M. C. A. 
have been appointed by the president: Devotional, 
E. D. White, '94, E. H. Henderson, '95, George 
Tsuda, '96; membership, E. H. Alderman, '94, F. 
C. Tobey, '95, J. E. Green, '96 ; missionary, H. P. 
Smead. '94, Shiro Kuroda, '95, Seijiro Saito, '96 ; 
nominating, G. E. Smith, '96, E. A. White, '95, E. 
E. Kinsman, '96. 

— The following officers were elected by the 
Boarding Club at a meeting held March 18 : pres't, 
business manager and 1st director, F. H. Henderson, 
'93; vice-president and 2nd director, G. H.BIerwin, 
'94; secretary, treasurer and 3rd director, F. S. 
Hoyt, '93; 4th director, H. M. Fowler, '94; 5th 
director, H. C, Burrington, '96: 6th director, A.J. 
Morse, '94; 7th director, J. Marsh, '95. 

— The committee on agriculture of the legislature 
has reported favorably a bill appropriating about 
$40,000 to the college to he expended as follows : 
For additional accommodations in the chemical 
department, $1200 ; for a system of sewerage dis 
posal, $1800; for insurance, furniture, taxes, col- 
lections, etc., $1500 ; for equipping a dairy school, 
$8500 ; for improvements at the farm house, $1500 ; 
for new barns, $25,000. The bill is now in the hands 
of the finance committee. 

— At a meeting of the class of '93, it was almost 
unanimously voted to hold a Senior promenade 
Tuesday night of commencement week. The class 
of Ninety-one held a like event two years ago and 
the present Seniors think they are justified in striving 
to make this a college custom, — an occasion to 
which students and alumni will look forward with 
pleasure every year. Definite arrangements have 
not been made as yet, but an enjoyable time may be 
anticipated. Invitations, etc., will be sent out in 
due time. 



lumm 



'80.— Mr. William Colvard Parker, of the Boston 
Common Council, who since a severe surgical opera- 
tion has spent the time recuperating his strength at 
Yonkers, N. Y., has returned to his duties at Bos- 
ton and may be found at his office No. 53 Tremont 
street. 

'82. — George D. Howe is general agent for 
Rhode Island for the Mapes Fertilizer Company. 

'83. — Llewellyn Smith of the Quinnipiac Fertilizer 
Co., 7 Exchange PI., Boston, was in town last 
week. His address is 24 Washington St., Worces- 
ter, ;\!ass. 

'83. — Prof. J. B. Lindsey welcomed a daughter 
to his family, Thursday, Apr. 13. 

'86. — Mr. Winfleld Ayres received tlie degree of 
M. D. from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College 
Mar. 27th. He was appointed on the third surgical 
division of Bellevue Hospital and began an eighteen 
months' service the first of this month. 

'86 — Mr. J. K. Barker, who has recently com- 
pleted a course in civil engineering at the Universi- 
ty of Illinois, is at present pursuing his profession 
at Constitution Wharf, Boston. 

'87. — BIr. F. H. Fowler has changed his residence 
from Waverly to Wayland where he has purchased 
a farm. 

'90. — Dwight W. Dickinson of the Boston Dental 
College is spending his vacation at his home in 
Amherst. 

'91. — C. A. Magill paid a short visit to the college 
last week. He will remain at No. 15 Cedar St., 
Maiden, until May 1st when he will leave for the 
Columbian Exposition. 

'91. — A. H. Sawyer is located at the Oak Grove 
Fruit Farm, Cromwell, Conn. 

'92. — G. B. Willard is at present working in a 
drug-store at Charlestown. 

'92.— W. C. Boynton of the Boston Dental Col- 
lege has been spending his Easter vacation at North 
Amherst. 



It is not at the close of their daily devotions, 
But at the close of the"season's" gay follies and notions , 
That society maidens of thirty and ten, 
Look up sadly, and sighing, then wliisper, "ah! men!" 

— Brunonian. 



154 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C^chaLn;^e|. 



Among the recent arrivals at our exchange table 
the Aurora of the Iowa Agricultural College and 
the PJireno Co-iinian of Dakota University are of 
especial excellence. We hope soon to include the 
publications of more of our sister agricultural col- 
leges in our exchange list. 

The Bates Student is responsible for this fact, 
that in the money expended for religious purposes, 
Princeton leads every college in the country. 

One of our young men went out to call, 
Sporthig a brand new "prince; " 

He placed his heel on a banana peel, 
And he hasn't bananawhere since. 

—Ex. 

The Purdue Exponent [■- one of the best periodi- 
cals that we receive. In its last issue was a fine 
frontispiece of the president of Lake Forest 
University. 

There is considerable excitement among the stu- 
dents of Parsons College over the action of the 
Senior class introducing the innovation of Oxford 
gowns and mortarboard hats. The students and 
faculty were much surprised the other morning 
when the Seniors marched into chapel arrayed in 
their new class dress. They were permitted to 
wear them that day without interference or unfav- 
orable comment, but the next morning, just after 
they had taken their places in chapel, the freshman 
class entered from a side door dressed in their last 
year's campaign costumes, composed of red caps 
and helmets, and marched solemnly to their places, 
and closely following them came the preps, dressed 
in Mother Hubbards. The effect was paralyzing, 
and even the faculty joined iu the uproar. — Chicago 
News Record. 

I met a girl of the . 

And gently pressed her |@^ 
I tlioiight I'd pop the ? 

But didn't have the s&. 

—Ex. 

At Harvard, for fifty years, no smoker has grad- 
uated with first honors of his class. — Ex. 

The law department of the University of Penn- 
sylvania has enrolled its first woman student. They 
have appropriately called her the sister-in-law. 



H. D. HEMENWAY, 



DEALER IN 



Student Supplies, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, NOTE BOOKS, WHITE GLOVES, 

POCKET LENSES, STATIONERY, BOTANY 

PRESSES, MAPLE SUGAR, 

CONFECTIONERY, 

ETC. 

PRICES LOW. 

21 NORTH COLLEGE. 




i^ovbizIm diamond. 

A High Grade 
Wheel for a lit- 
tle money. 

Solid Tire, $85. 
CiisliioiiTire,$90. 
^^ Pneumatic 
Tire, $115. 

Send for Catalogue. 

FDK S\LL L\ 

B025; sse, - - A.i»a:H:Ei?,ST, Ivia-Ss. 

4IS=*A11 correspondence will receive prompt attention.-^sgi 



STUDENTS' 8UPPLIES. 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 
FIRST CTjASS goods. PRICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH colubge:. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

*Co-OpmtiYe Steam Lamdrj^^ 

and Carpet Reiiovatii [stablisliineiit, 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



155 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 



" Lamps and Lamp Mi aieOiiii" 

iTJiir^ars' block, ambersi, mass. 
AMHERST HOUSE 

UVERY, FEED i SALE STABLE, 

T. L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMMERST, MASS. 



DEALER IN 



FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

PIME STSTiaWEHY. 
REPAiRiNG NEATLY A^O ROIVIPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



3, 0. P 



H 



h. 




.A.3VEI3:EE,ST, 



:m:.a.ss. 



iC^s. 



The President will lie at his office at the library 
from 2 to 4 every afternoon except Saturday and 
.Sunday. 

The treasurer will be at his ofHce at the Botanic 
Museum from 4 to 5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and 
on Saturdays from 3 to 6-3Up. m. 

The college library will be open from 2 to 4 p. m. 
and from 6-30 to 8 p. m. week days. On Saturday 
from 8 to 12 a. m and from 1 to 4 p. m. On Sun- 
day for reference only, from 12 m. to 3 p. m. 

Amherst College library will be open from 8-45 
A. M. to 6 p. M. and from 6-30 to 9-30 p. m. except 
Sundays and holidays. 

Mails leave the college for tlie post-olBoe at 12-30 p. M. 
and 7-40 p. M. on week clays. Sundays at 4-45 p.m. 

Trains leave Amherst as follows : 

North, 9-22 A. M., 11-44 A. M., 8-41 P. M. 

South, 7-05 A. M., 12-04 P. M., 6-03 P. M. 

East, 5-23 A. M., 6-10 a. M., 8-30 a. M., 2-36 p. M. , 7-24 
p. M. 

West, 8-11 a.m., 10-20 a.m., 11-16 a. m., 1-25 p. m., 
5-14 p. M. 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



10s MAIN STREET, 



NORTBAMPTON, MASS. 



156 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes S Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Slieet Music, 



Music Bookfc 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 



„(. DENTISTS. 5).. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CVTIiMM'S BI.OCK, AMBEJRST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
S A-. IVt. TO 5 F. li/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! I.OW FE,ICES! 

GOOB WOKK WAHK-AMTED! 

First Door from Post-offlce. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONEECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PBTSICIANS' I'BBSCJtIPriONS C AIRE FVI^I^Y 
COMPO TJNDEO, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PH.ARMACY, 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your 'QQ^'Ss here. 

WLLL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODGETT h CLARK' 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



Far Enita and Fall GvErogats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



mi ITAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscnit go to 



FRANK O. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseau, 

RAZORS HONED. 

Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWAED A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
OfflcCf Cooh's Block. Amherst^ JIfass, 






H 



H 



ikO. 



FREBH ASra FINE. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst House Block, 



Amherst, lass, 



HEJSTRY ^I3A.MS, 



:F'33:-^3^3ivd:.<^c;is'X'. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Druos and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, aud Sporting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls respouded to at residenf^e, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



5. g. DI(?HI(^5C)(^> D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hour.s, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 P. M. 



^"■Etlier and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T thiie; 



AMHERST GASH SHOE STQREi 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 

JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 

A. GLYNN, 



/ 



TAILOR 



1850. 



1892. 



THE PnQTaBRJLPHER. 



NEW SKY LIC3HT. 
EINLARGEID OPERATING ROOM. 

CLASS AND SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY. 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



Repairing Neatly Dotie. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



Pilitapy Suits and Tmmmitigs. 



assachusetts Aaricultural Colleae, 




rs pm i Aa fTP) fa.imuvjt^»^rjt. - Mit^ w i ' i.'i\^*^ < i^ ,*VW>r^f ^J';^l;ifri-C.'SmJ>'-^. 




-^)i[j^ljiriimaaiLyrts..^a,^-<n,anf:satL'7mtV . ..tamytKr.CTgTA.n v^njptftiT^^^ ^>^t>—waaui-ii«»jai.-iiin&T',tTr,y'irinr 




A.ii:^lxe^r»«^t, .^J^o.:s^«»< 




C^4m^. J4^^Cc^U'<-^^^^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^MHERBT, MASS., MiLY 3, iBS3. 



VDL. III. ]^n. 14. 



*BR1MTERS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



THE ABIHERST 

MiWm >ND CAR 



n^rn 



C. H, SANDERSOfi k CO., 



CASH DEALERS IN 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



SjiNDEpH k lmm{}\ 



CASH DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

FOE EVERYBODY. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES. PILLOWS, STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 



CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All Goods STRICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST FRIGES. 

E. 13. MA.IISH, 

10 PHCENIX ROW, - AMHERST, MASS. 



A FINE LIKE OF 9TDDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



K,E:F.A.IElIISrC3- I303>TB mOJWIE'TIj-Sr. 



T, W. SLOAN, 

2 PBOStflX ROW. 



5. A. PHILLIPS, 

Praetkal EloiT|ber. 

STEA/n AND GAS FITTER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heatius a Specialty. 



AGO 




LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



Aj\1HER«T, MASS., MAY 3, 1893. 



No. 14 



f\ \& %A & ba Brt fi 1^ & ! 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance- 



Single copies. 10c- 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARV OF EDITOMS : 

C. F. WALKER, '94, Editor in-oMef. 

G. H- .MERWIN, '94, Business Manager. 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

F. L. GREENE, '94, T. P. FOLEY, '95, 

E. O. BAGG, '95, C. B. LANE, '95, 

B. L. HATWARD, '96. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communica- 
tions should be addressed Aggie Lite, Amherst ILass. 



It is necessary that all outstanding subscriptions be 
paid at once- Subscribers finding this item marked please 
make payment to the Business Manager as soon as 
possible. 



Cdl'^riais. 



Last commencemeui it was publicly announced 
that during the ensuing college year, a prize would 
be awarded in the mathematical departmi^nt Since 
that time, with the exception of the meagre informa- 
tion contained in the college catalogue, we under- 
stand no further announcement has been made, even 
to members of the senior class. A prize of fifty 
dollars is worth striving for. Is it not time that a 
formal announcement of the conditions under which 
it is offered should be made to those who are to 
enter the competiiion? 



Our critic has been in the library and the results 
of his explorations will be found in another column. 
The growth of this department of the college has 
been so rapid that the studelits have barely been 
able to make themselves familiar with the titles even 
of the more important of the new books. We 



hope, by publishing in the Life the names of the 
more interesting of the volumes which are being 
placed on the library shelves, to make the depart- 
ment of still more use to the students than it has 
been in the past. 



We wish to commend the members of the class 
of '95 who have seen the necessity of improving the 
ravine. Their work on Arbor Day i? a move in the 
right direction toward the improvement of what 
might be made one of the most beautiful places on 
the college grounds. Hitherto this has served the 
purpose of a "dump," judging from the heterogen- 
eous accumulations of matter found there. Let the 
good work initiated by '95 be continued and in place 
of this unsightly spot we shall have a natural orna- 
ment to the grounds to which Wi; can point with 
pride. 



College pranks are inseparable from college life. 
When they arise from a purely innocent sense of 
fun and cause no inconvenience they may be criti- 
cised but not opposed ; when, however, the deeds of 
certain students arouse the indignation of the whole 
college and threaten to affect the good name of the 
institution, it is time the perpetrators realized the 
foolishness of their actions, and turned their atten- 
tion to more honorable employment- Authorities 
may be eluded and offenders may escape detection, 
but there is no escape from the verdict of public 
opinion. 



With the introduction of electives in the course 
there comes to each member of the present junior 
class the question, What studies shall I take nest 
year? The problem demands a great deal of 
thought. The decision should be made with refer- 
ence to what one's life work is to be so that be may 
elect those studies that best equip him for bis future 



158 



AGGIE LIFE. 



career. Out of the uine elect! ves offered, at least 
three must be chosen, but the choice will be practi- 
cally limited to certain sets or courses of these nine 
as the schedule will probably not be arranged so 
that each student could pick out any three studies 
and not have the hours of some of them conflict. 
Again the nature of the work to be done would in 
some measure influence the choice. It would be a 
great help in deciding which studies to elect if by 
some arrangement the schedule for next term's 
work for the senior class, at least, could be pub- 
lished before next vacation. 



Again we are shocked by a tale of cruelty in con- 
nection with the Greek letter societies of one of our 
colleges, an outrage of which the Spanish Inquisition 
might have been proud. This time it comes from a 
western college and a theological one at that. Four 
juniors, while initiating a man into their society, 
were attacked by twelve sophomores, belonging to 
a rival society', by whom they were stripped and 
beaten till they were insensible. They were bound 
hand and foot, gagged, blistered on their legs and 
backs, and as a crowning cruelty, branded on their 
faces, like Texan steers, in such a way that they must 
bear the marks for life. It is a fact, at times un- 
pleasant, that whatever is done by one college or 
society reflects indirectly upon all others ; so that it 
is the duty of us all to express our abhorrence of 
all such outrages as the above. Warrants are out 
for the arrest of the members of the assaulting 
party, and it is our earnest wish that they may be 
apprehended and punished to the full extent of the 
law. 



The declamations of the twenty members chosen 
frf)m the sophomore and freshman classes was held 
at the Old Chapel last week and proved a greater 
attraction to the student body than any of those of 
previous years. The rendering of all the selections 
was exceptionally good. Although the members 
have been chosen to appear on the commencement 
stage, let those who were unsuccessful realize that 
other opportunities for acquiring excellence in this 
department will continually be open to them 
throughout the rest of their course, and they may 
gain the desired positions later on. Let no one 
underestimate the value that this training is to each 



one who participates, not only to the commence- 
ment speakers but to those who have worked for the 
exercise held so recently. During the latter part of 
the college course the students begin to see the ben- 
efits of such training. These exercises were but 
public demonstrations of the excellent work accom- 
plished by the English Department during the past 
year. 



The battalion is improving. This is quite evi- 
dent. But the improvement is slow. There must 
be some real work done by both officers and men if 
we are to present our usual fine appearance at com- 
mencement. And we ought, not only to endeavor 
to appear as well as usual, but better than ever 
before. "Constant improvement," should be our 
motto on drill. The present condition of the bat- 
talion is far from satisfactory. The principal faults 
seem to be in dressing, following the guides and 
keeping the intervals. And yet, upon these appar- 
ently unimportant points depends the rapidity and 
accuracy of the different movements. Although a 
certain amount of company drill has been held 
during the winter we think an occasional exercise of 
this kind would be of great benefit. Then the cap- 
tains would be brought into closer contact with the 
men and would be able to pay more attention to 
mistakes than at present. As it is now, the cap- 
tains are obliged to keep their companies moving 
and it is well nigh impossible to repeat commands 
and correct mistakes at the same time. A rest 
might also be given now and then with good effects. 
We have no doubt but that the companies will put 
more earnest work into the drill if they are rested 
once or twice'ia the hour. A more uniform cadence 
might also be acquired. But as long as the drill is 
"Battalion drill," we should make it battalion drill 
and try to bring the drill up to as high a degree of 
perfection as possible. The appearance of the 
battalion at commencement should be a matter of 
personal pride with every student. 



THE REASON. 

succeed 



The ladies now, as clerks 

In doing very well ; 
The reason tho' Is clear indeed 

In Hgures they excel. 



-Brunonian. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



159 



THE COLLEGE EXHIBIT. 

The entire exliibit of the Mass. Agricultural Col- 
lege and Experiment Stations ha?; been forwarded to 
Chicago to Maj Henry E. Alvord who has taken 
them in charge and attended to their arrangement 
on the exposition grounds. 

The buildings and the general equipment of the 
college are represented by a collection of twenty- 
four photographs, which were taken especially for 
the purpose. Among the more interesting of these 
may be mentioned exterior and interior views of the 
Stone Chapel and of the Durfee Plant House, the 
latter, showing the tropical plants growing in the 
house, being especially fine. Interior views of all 
the principal recitation and lecture rooms, and of 
the various laboratories with apparatus displayed 
are also Included in the collection. There are also 
two interior views of the museum of natural history 
and two of the meteorological observatory. Besides 
these, there are fourteen photographs of the college 
organizations, including the secret societies, the 
editorial boards of Aggie Life and the Index, the 
glee club, orchestra, and the base-ball and foot-ball 
teams of last year. A complete file of the college 
catalogue and of the bulletins of the Hatch Station 
accompany the exhibit, also the last volume of 
Aggie Life and the last three volumes of the Index. 
A large map of the college grounds will also be dis- 
played. Of the articles exhibited by the various 
departments may be mentioned the following : agri- 
cultural department; collection of soil samples 
taken from different parts of the state and accom- 
panied by the results of their mechanical and chem- 
ical analysis ; veterinary department, clastic model 
of the horse ; entomological department, represen- 
tations of the gypsy moth in all its stages ; horticul- 
tural department, a case containing specimens rep- 
resenting the progress of agriculture and horticul- 
ture as shown by the changes in plant growth, forty- 
seven specimens of valuable woods of Massa- 
chusetts, the apparatus used b}' Pres't Clark in 
studying the pressure exerted by the flow of sap, a 
collection of botanical charts used in class-room 
instruction, and a reproduction of the famous squash 
with its apparatus complete. 



The wood used in the construction of the Massa- 
chusetts bay window in the forestry building was 
furnished by the college. The Durfee Plant-House 
has been taken as a model of glass structures, and 
at the lecture on the subject to be delivered in con- 
nection with the fair, views of the building will be 
shown with the stereopticon. The meteorological 
observatory will also be used as an illustration of 
the modern type of signal service equipment. 

The exhibit lias been prepared with the greatest 
of care and reflects great credit on those who had 
charge of its preparation. It will show to all friends 
of the college who visit the fair that the M. A. C. is 
far ahead of the other institutions of its kind in the 
United States. It will be of great interest to the 
alumni and former students of the college who live 
in the west, and it will contribute to the advance- 
ment of the institution by bringing its advantages 
to the notice of many persons who could be reached 
in no other way. 



BASEBALL. 
M. A. C, 9 ; Mt. Hermon, 2. 
The base-ball team defeated Mt. Hermon upon 
the campus, April 22d, by a score of 9-2. Aggie 
played a flue fielding game but was weak at the bat. 
Bagg covered first in a creditable manner, making 
sevear! star plays, and the work of Read at short- 
stop and Curley at the plate was very commendable. 
The Hermonites excelled at the bat, making several 
first class singles, just beyond the Aggie infield. 
The features of the game were Capt. Curley's long 
hits into left field. The score : 



F. Read, bs, 
Clark, 2b, 
Sullivan, rf , 
W". Carley, c, 

G. Curley, If, 
Day, 3b, 
Bagg, lb, 
Howard, cf , 
H. Read, p, 



M. A. C. 

AB K IBTBSHPO A E 
41000070 

4 10 14 3 1 
42220000 
3 10 13 10 
41250000 
32000332 
3 1 1 1 16 3 
3 2 10 10 1 
30000070 



Total, 


31 9 

MT. HERMON 


6 


9 


2 


27 


21 


7 




A B K 


1 B 


T B 


S H 


PO 


A 


F 


Edwards, es, c. 


4 1 





(1 





7 


4 


1 


Medway, lb. 


3 











9 





] 


Chase, p, If, 


4 








1 


(1 


1 


1 


Ford, cf. 


4 


2 


2 








1 





.Jobusou, 3b, 


4 











4 


1 


1 


O'Connor, rf, p, 


4 1 


1 


1 








7 





Belts, rf, 


4 








1 








1 


Abbott, c, 























Maynard, 2b, 


4 


1 


1 





3 


4 





Watson, If, 88, 


3 


1 


1 





I 





1 



Total, 



24 18 6 



i6o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Innings, 


1 


■2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


M. A. C, 


4 





2 


1 


1 








1 


— 9 


Mt. Hermon, 





1 


1 

















0- 2 



Stolen bases— Maynard, Medway, Ford, Johnson, O'Connor, Sulli 
van, Bagg 3, Day 2, W. Curley 2, H. Bead, Clark. Two-base hit— 
G. Curley. Three-base hit — tr. Curley. First base on balls— F. 
Read, Clark, Sullivan, W. Curley 2, Howard, H. -Read, Medway. 
First base on errors — Aggie 5, Mt. Hermon 6. Left on bases — Aggie 
7, Mt. Hermon 5. Struck out— F. Read 2, SuUiv.in, Day, H. Bead 2, 
Maynard, Watson. Batters hit — Day, Bagg. Double play— Clark 
to Bagg. Passed balls — Abbott 3, Edwards 4. Wild pitch— Chase. 
Time— Ih. 45m. Umpires— Lehnert, '93, and Harris, Amherst, '96. 
Scorer— Keith. 

M. A. C. 10; Amherst, '96, 3. 
Aggie defeated the Amherst Freshman team on 
Pratt Field, Wednesday, Apiii 26th, by a score of 
10-3. The game was rather loosely played but at 
times was quite interesting. The freshmen secured 
their only runs in the third inning by means of three 
singles and a bad error. Aggie hit Harris quite as 
often as the ball was placed over the plate. The 
score : 



F. Kead, ss, 
W. Curley, c, 
Sullivan, rf, 

G. Curley, If, 
Clark, 2b, 
Howard, of, 
Bagg, lb. 
Day, 3b, 

H. Read, p, 



A B 

4 
2 
3 
4 
5 
5 
S 
5 
4 



1 E 

1 

3 
2 
i 




1 

1 



T E 


1 
3 



S H 






1 
1 








P o 

1 

7 
1 

2 
2 
11 



Total, 


37 
iMHERST, 


10 
'96. 


10 


10 


2 


27 


14 


2 




A B 


K 


1 B 


T B 


8 H 


P o 


A 


E 


Traet, of. 


3 


1 


1 


1 











1 


Hill, c. 


4 


1 


2 


o 





1 








Barker, If, 


4 





1 


1 













Tyler, 3b, 


4 














2 


•2 


1 


Pratt, BS, 


4 


1 


1 


1 





3 








Fales, lb. 


3 











1 


14 





1 


Halligan, 2b, 


3 














4 


5 


1 


Nichols, rf , 


4 





2 


2 














Harris, p. 


4 

















6 


1 



Total, 



33 



1 24 13 



Innings, 123456789 

M. A. C, 2 3 2 3 —10 

Amherst, '96, 00030000 0— 3 

Earned runs — Aggie 4, Amherst 1 . Sacrifice hits— Fales, Clark, 
Howard. Stolen bases— Sullivan 5. W. Curley 4, G. Curley 3, How- 
ard, Day, Baker, Pratt. First base on balls— Halligan, W. Curley 
3, Sullivan 2, G. Curley. First base on errors— Aggie 1, Amberst 1' 
Struck out-G. Curley, Barker 2, Tyler 2, Trask, Hill. Hit by batted 
ball — Trask, F. Read. Time — Ih. 30ru. Umpires — Van Sant, Am- 
herst, '95; Howard, Aggie '93. Scorer— T. F. Keith. 

Worcester Tech., 14 ; M. A. C, 8. 
The college team was defeated at Worcester, 
April 29, by the Polytechnic Institute nine, the 
score being 14-8. Aggie started out well, making 



five runs in the first inning. In the third and fourth 
innings "Tech." found the ball quite readily and 
aided by errors succeeded in making four runs. 
Curley, who has not pitched before, this year, went 
into the box in the fifth, but was wild, and conse- 
quently proved inefl'ective. Tech played well at 
critical points, but as a whole the game was quite 
uninteresting. The score : 



Gallagher, If, 
Phillpot, cf , 
Zaeder, lb, 
Gordon, cf , 
Howe, rf, 
Knowles, ss, 
Harris, 3b, 
Perkins, 2b, 
Waitt, p. 

Total, 



F. Read, ss, 
W. Curley, c, 
Sullivan, rf, 

G. Curley, H, p, 
Clark, 2b, 
Howard cf, 
Bagg, lb. 
Day, 3b, 
H. Read, p, 
Jones, If, 

Total, 
Innings, 
Worcester Tech., 
M. A. C, 

Times at bat^Tech. 39, Aggie 40. 
Phillpot 4, Zaeder 2, Howe Knowles, Perkins 4, Waitt, F. Read. 
Two-base hit — Zaeder, Perkins, W. Curley. First base on balls — 
F. Read 2, W. Curley 2, Sullivan 2, Gallagher 2, Howe 2, Knowles, 
Waitt. Struck out— H. Read 2, Bagg, Waitt 2, Knowles 2, Harris 2, 
Howe. Batters hit— Read, Perkins, W. Curley. Passed balls— 
Curley 2. Wild pitch— Waitt. Time— 2h. 15m. Umpires— Dwinnell, 
Tech : Lehenrt, Aggie. 
Scorer — Keith. 



WOBCE8TEK 


TECH 












K 


IB 




P O 


A 


E 




2 


















3 


3 




7 


3 







2 


3 




9 










2 


2 




3 





1 












1 





« 




1 







2 


4 


1 












2 


1 


3 




3 


2 




2 


1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


6 







14 


11 




27 


15 


6 


M 


A. C 














R 


IB 




p o 


A 


E 




2 


1 







5 


2 




2 


2 




7 


1 







1 













2 




1 


3 




4 


7 







1 


1 




3 













2 




1 





1 












9 





1 







1 










2 







1 







4 







1 


1 















8 


12 




24 


17 


6 


1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 7 


8 


9 


1 


3 


1 





6 3 


1 


-14 


5 1 














1 


1— 8 



Stolen bases— Gallagher 3, 



NOTICE. 
The base-ball season is barely open with us as 
yet, but in the games that have been played on our 
campus, the conduct on the part of a good many has 
not been quite what could be desired. Quite natur- 
ally, there is a tendency to become excited when a 
o-ood liitis made by the home team, but let the players 
do the coaching. There is nothing that will so con- 
fuse a base runner as to have too many telling him 
what to do. Again we must be preparing for the 
important games, at which we can demonstrate our 
interest in the team by manifesting enthusiasm. 
Good systematic cheering has often won a game. 



AGGIE JLIFE. 



i6i 



simply by giving renewed inspiration to the players. 
Help the team along in every way possible and if 
you are called upon to assist in the practice, do it. 
In this way the whole college can aid in bringing 
about a successful season. 



BOOKS TO READ. 

Among the volumes that have recently been added 
to the college library the following are especially 
worth}' of mention. 

The Victorian Age of English Literature, by Mrs. 
Oliphant, is a handy book in two volumes giving 
just the information needed by the general reader in 
regard to the lives and works of the great army of 
writers in all fields of literature who have made the 
reign of Queen Victoria almost as brilliant as tiiat 
of Elizabeth. 

Contemporary criticism labors, of course, uuder 
many disadvantages ; but the author strives to judge 
impartially and, while generous in her praise of true 
merit, does not allow herself to unduly laud those 
recent writers whose hold upon popular favor 
depends rather upon their bold flights of imagination 
and brilliant descriptive powers than upou more 
solid literary qualifications. The last chapter of the 
book is devoted to an interesting account of the 
leading British magazines and newspapers. 

Wisps of Wit and Wisdom is the title of a little 
book which contains, iu the form of replies lo quer- 
ies, much odd and interesting information. Among 
the questions answered are : What was the origin 
of the Crescent? How did the expression "Davy 
Jones' Locker" originate? How did the ladies' 
privilege in leap year originate? How did the word 
"Tory" originate? 

For those interested in the science of the stars 
Old and New Astronomy , by Richard A. Procter, is 
a valuable and instructive book. It treats iu the 
earlier chapters of the history of astronomy, its 
development and present status as a science, while 
the remainder of the work is devoted to exposition 
of our present knowledge of the sun, moon, [ilanets, 
asteroids and the stellar systems.. Mr. Procter 
held high rank as an astrononaer and this work, 
the completion of which was prevented by his 
untimely death, oontaios the results of his life-long 
studies. It is richly illustrated with plates and cuts 
while the clear, graceful style makes it readable 



even for one ignorant of astronomical science. 
Aspirants for the position of Second Lieutenant 
in the U. S. A. have ample directions as to the 
manner of attaining that position in Three Roads to 
a Commission. In tins is given an account of the 
requirements for entrance to West Point and the 
course there ; also the qualifications required in 
applicants for commissions coming from the ranks 
of the army or from civil life. 



FIELD DAY. 

The arrangements for the spring athletic meet are 
nearly completed. The trustees of the college have 
consented to set apart May 17 as a Field Day, to be 
devoted to the athletic interests of the college, no 
regular exercises to be held on that day. Through 
the efforts of Prof. Brooks the use of Hampshire 
Park has been secured free of charge. If a suffi- 
cient number of students desire it, barges will run 
from the college to the grounds. Admission will be 
free. 

The. order of events is substantially as follows; 

In the forenoon, beginning at nine o'clock, there 
will be : — 

1. Running hop, step and jump. 

2. Pole vault. 

3. 220-yard dash. 

4. Putting shot (16 lbs.). 

5. Standing high jump. 

6. Running broad jump. 

7. Mile run. 

8. Three Standing jumps. 

9. Relay race. (1 inile. Any number of teams 

of four men each may take part.) 
In the afternoon, beginning at two o'clock, the 
following events will take place : 

1. Standing broad jump. 

2. Throwing hammer. (12 lbs.) 

3. 100-yd dash. 

4. Throwing base-ball. 

5. Running high jump. 

6. Half-mile run. 

7. Hurdle race. (120 yds. 3^ ft. hurdles.) 

8. Half-mile walk. 

9. Bicycle race, (one mile.) 

The names of all contestants must be handed to 
the directors before Friday, May 12, as programs 
are to be printed and distributed the following day. 
It is hoped that as many of the alumni and friends 
of the college as can do so will attend this meet, and 
help to make it what it should be, a success in every 
respect. 



l62 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Coik^^ fySo-t^s- 



— Athletics ! 

— Tennis once more. 

— Keep off the grass. 

— Did you hear Pailerewski? 

— H. H. Roper, '96, has returned. 

— The drill for Thursday, April 27, was held the 
following day. 

— Everybody practice for Field Day. The best 
class must win. 

— H. G. Stockwell, '94, is still very sick at liis 
home in Sutton. 

— E. D. White, '94, has nearly recovered from 
his sprained ankle. 

— The Junior class has just commenced a text- 
book on electricity. 

— A. X. Petit's dancing class meets on Monday 
night at the college. 

— All preliminary sets in the tennis tournament 
must be played by 9 p. m., Saturday, May 6. 

— The class of Ninety-five celebrated Arbor Day 
by planting trees on the banks of the ravine. 

— F. T. Harlow, '93, who has been sick at his 
home since last term has returned to college. 

— The seniors celebrated Arbor Day by clearing 
up their class grove and setting out new trees. 

— B. K. Jones, '96, who has been suffering from 
inflammatory rheumatism, has returned to college. 

— Now that the thesis is out of the way the weary 
senior begins to think of his class day appointment. 

— The committees on education, military and agri- 
culture will probably inspect the college in the near 
future. 

— Quite a number of the boys took advantage of 
the game at Worcester to pay a short visit to their 
homes. 

— There will probably be three more entertain- 
ments in the Union lecture course — two lectures and 
a concert. 

— At a meeting of the Press Club held April 25, 
T. S. Bacon, '94, was elected president and C. F. 
Walker, '94, secretary and treasurer. M. E. Sellew, 
'96, has been admitted to membership. 



— Juniors are again chasing insects. 

— Ninety-four planted trees on Arbor Day 

— Ninety-four has elected a musical director. 

— Only six weeks more — and Commencement. 

— Kev. F. J. Fairbanks of East Amherst occu- 
pied the college pulpit, April 23. 

— Visitors at battalion drill now-a-days. There is 
plenty of lOom on the chapel steps. 

— R. H. Vaughan. '96, is doing considerable in 
the line of Natural History collecting. 

— Corporal H. M. Fowler and Private Day have 
been transferred from Co. A to Co. D. 

— May 6 we play Trinity at Hartford, Conn. 
Let a large number accompany the team. 

— Prof. Maynaid addressed the Amateur Horti- 
cultural Society at Springfield, April 21. 

— A large number of new and valuable models 
have recently been placed in the museum. 

— Nearly every member of the Senior class has 
applied for the Boston University diploma. 

— Ninety-six has accepted the challenge of Ninety- 
five to a game of ball to he played May 10. 

— The water in the pond has been drawn off 
preparatory to the proposed improvements. 

— Drury, '9.t, went home last week. He will take 
the competitive examination for an appointment to 
West Point. 

— Ruggles, '91, Legate, '91, and Crane, '92, were 
among the alumni wlio witnessed the game at Wor- 
cester Saturday. 

— There was a large attendance from both col- 
leges at the lecture by Lieut. R. E. Peary, held in 
the Town Hall. April 26. 

— At the Mt. Hermon game Abbott, the catcher 
of the visiting team was quite seriously injured in 
the hand by a pitched ball. 

— -A fine engraving of Lord Tennyson has been 
presented to the college by L. W. Smith, '93, and 
has been placed in the Library. 

— The century plant is making slow but sure 
progress in the wa^' it should go and it still receives 
a large amount of attention from visitors. 

— We hope the band will soon commence a series 
of open air concerts for the benefit of tired and over- 
worked students. Music liath charms to soothe. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



163 



— Alderman, '94, was out of town over Sunday. 

— April 29, Arbor Day, insptction was omitted. 

— Hunting for arbutus is now a fav<irite pastime. 

— The fountain at the botanic museum has been 
repaired. 

— The Sophomore class lias commenced fiekl-work 
in surveying. 

— M. A. C. vs. Amherst '96 on the home grounds 
this afternoon. 

— T. F. Keith, '94, is the ofiicial scorer for tiie 
baseball association. 

— May 17 is Field Day. No recitations will be 
held during tlie day. 

— F. E. Paige, tlie former tre.isurer of the college, 
was in town April 23. 

— Thirty-one singles and fifteen douhies will be 
played in the tennis tournament. 

— Mr. Clias. A. INIilis of tlie examining commit- 
tee visited the collejie, Apiil 19. 

— The reports of local games in the newspapers 
show some features which are startling. Don't 
blame the scorers, however, or the hard working 
correspondents. Lay it to the soulless type, or the 
remorseless telegraph. 

— The report of the State Board of Agriculture 
for 1892 has lieen distributed to the students. It 
contains a comprehensive paper on the work of the 
Agricultural College and Hatch Experiment Station, 
by Prof. W. P. Brooks. 

— The following promotions have been made in 
the corps of cadets: to be 1st sergeant, sergeant 
C. L. Brown, assigned to Co. B ; to be sergeants, 
corporal C. F. Walker, assigned to Co. D, and 
corporal E. L. Boardman, assigned to Co. C. 

— A letter received from Lane, '96, who is one 
ol the parly who left the college some time ago lor 
Chicago reports that the boys are comfortably in- 
stalled in Bingo hall, on Madison avenue, and are 
enjoying life in company with students from all over 
the country. 

— The banner to be presented by the athletic 
association to the class victorious in athletics can 
now be seen in the chapel reading room. It is made 
of maroon and white silk on which are inscribed in 
gold, "Champions, M. A. C. A. A." It is very 
handsome. 



— Cutter, '94, is College Agent for W. H. Ean- 
ney of North Amherst. 

— Articles by Profs. Walker and Warner of this 
college, accompanied by portraits of the authors, 
were published in the Massachusetts edition of Oood 
Roads. 

— A fac-simile of Shakespeare's will has been 
placed in the library. It is the present of Mr. 
Heaton of Amherst and is a curiosity worthy of ex- 
amination. 

— Pres. Goodell has forwarded a formal request 
to the Governor asking that a room at the State 
Building be set aside for the use of the students 
and ahimni of this college as a headquarters during 
the World's Fair. 

— We would remind contributors from the lower 
classes that all articles they may submit for publi- 
cation will be credited to them and will be consid- 
ered at the next election whether they are published 
in the papei or not. 

— At a meeting of the Natural History Society, 
April 24, the following officers were elected for the 
ensuing year: president, I. C. Greene, '94; vice- 
president, J. E. Gifford, '94; secretary and treas- 
urer, H. L. Frost, '95 ; directors, T. S. Bacon, '94, 
L. H. Bacon, '94, L. M. Barker, '94, R. H.Vaughan, 
■96, E. D. White, '94. 

— April 19, at College Hall, Fletcher Dobyns of 
Oberlin college addressed the prohibition clubs of 
the two colleges on the "Political Battle-grounds of 
the Future." After the address each of the clubs 
voted to send a representative to the State Inter- 
collegiate Oratorical Contest to be held at Boston 
in June. Mr. Melendy, '93, will represent the M. 
A. C. club. 

— Tuesday, April 25, the Finance committee re- 
ported favorably the bill appropriating $39,500 for 
the use ot the college, with the amendment that but 
$14,500 be expended the present year. At the 
hearing held Monday, April 24, Pres. Goodell, 
Prof. Brooks and Levi Stockbridge represented the 
college. Ex-Senator C. A. Gleason, of the board 
of trustees, was also present. The committee 
seemed to be favorably inclined toward the college 
and only introduced the amendment on account of 
the unusually large number ofappropriations they 
had made daring the present year. The bill is now 
in the hands of the Senate. 



164 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— Local tramps are taking advantage of the flnc- 
weather to explore the country. Mt. Warner to 
the west, Toby and Siigarloaf to the north, the 
Holyoke range on the south and Mt. Lincoln, tower- 
ing up amid the sand-hills of Pelham, all afford ex- 
cellent advantages for scientific instruction. He who 
lives near to natuie's heart can appreciate the true 
charms of this historic valley of the Connecticut. 

— A class championship tournament has been 
arranged by the tennis association and the finals 
will be played by the champions of the various 
classes. No prizes are offered. Although this is 
pre-eminently the seasonof outdoor sports, base ball 
practice and training for field-day, those who are 
interested in contests on the court should strive to 
make this tournament a success. Quite a large 
number of entries has been made. 

— April 20, linemen completed their work on the 
telegraph line between the office down town and the 
meteorological observatory. The wire was strung 
as far as the chapel on the electric light poles, a 
considerable exijeuse thus being saved. We under- 
stand that the line is the property of the college, and 
although the Western Union Company would prob- 
ably be unwilling to start a regular office hei'e, for 
communication between the college and town the 
new wire may prove a great convenience. 

— The members of the Freshman class who were 
seleeted by Prof. Mills to si)eak before the faculty 
in competition for commencement appointments, 
rendered their selections in the Old Chapel, April 
25, before an unusually large audience. The follow- 
ing were appointed to compete for the rhetorical 
prizes to be offered nest commencement by the 
Western Alumni Association : H. C. Burrington, F. 
L.Clapp,P A.Leamy,S.Sastre. The other members 
of the class who spoke were : F. E. DeLuce, S. L. 
Morse, I. C. Poole, Seijiro Saito, and George 
Tsuda. H. H. Roper, who was appointed to speak, 
was out of town at the time of the exercise. The 
Sophomore competition was held April 27. The 
men who received appointments were E. H. Clark, 
T. P. Foley, Shiro Kuroda and 8. P. Toole. The 
others who rendered selections were W. L. Bemis, 
H. S. Fairbanks, F. H. Henderson, and M. J. Sul- 
livan. F. C. Tobey, who was to speak, was ex- 
cused while J. H. Jones, who was also on the list, 
was unable to be present. 



— The agitation at Amherst College on the sub- 
ject of compulsory church and chapel has lately 
reached a climax. For a long time there has been 
a strong sentiment among the students in favor of 
non-compulsory attendance at these exercisi'S, while 
the faculty has been almost unanimously opposed to 
it. At an open meeting of the college senate held 
last week the subject was brought before that body 
in the form of a resolution. The student members 
of the senate voted unanimously to support the 
measure bit it failed to escape the president's veto. 



T. M. C. A. TOPICS. 



May 4. — Make a Joyful Noise Unto the Lord. 

(Prayer and Praise Meeting.) Ps. 100. 

E. A. Hawks. 
May 7. — Christ Died for'Us, are We Living for 

Him? Is. 53:4-9; Rom. 12:1. G. A. 

Billings. 
May 11. — God Hears and Answers Prayers. Ps. 

10:17; John 11 :42. E. H. Alderman. 
May 14. — "I shall give Thee the Heathen for Thine 

Inheritance." (Missionary Meeting.) 

Ps. 2 :8 ; Eccles. 11 :1. F. S. Hoyt." 



MATHEMATICAL PRIZE. 
The prize offered this year in the department of 
Mathematics by Prof. Warner, consists of fifty 
dollars. No second prize will be offered. The 
competition is open to members of the senior class 
and will be decided by a written examination to be 
held sometime during the last week of the term 
This examination will consist of ten or fifteen ques- 
tions on the subjects of the regular course, as fol- 
lows : advanced algebra, geometry, trigonometry, 
mensuration, ' mechanics, and possibly surveying. 
The examination will be conducted by Prof. Warner 
and the papers will he sijjned with assumed names. 
One or more judges will be selected, probably pro- 
fessors in other institutions, who will mark the 
papers on the neatness and accuracy of the work. 
The student who stands the highest, if above sixty- 
five, will be awarded the prize. The previous 
standing of the competitors in the mathematical 
department will have no influence on the examination. 



Nine of the twenty-one men who received philo 
sophical and high orations on the Junior appoint- 
ment list at Yale, are from New England prepara- 
tory schools. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



x6S 



A CONTRAST. 

As she writes. 
She sits In her dainty boudoir 
Inditing a note to me, 
Surrounded with pretty trinkets 
Arranged there so tastily, 
With the sunshine lightly touching 
Her hair of the raven's hue, 
And the odor of violets scenting 
The air, like the breath of dew. 
As I write. 
I sit by the student's table 
Littered with papers and notes ; 
From a pipe of " Old Gold," breathing incense, 
A cloud of sweet fragrance there floats. 
With knick-knacks thrown 'round helter-skelter 
On mantel, on table, and floor. 
As I sit here inscribing a letter 
To the dear one I fondly adore. 



Alu 



mm 



'74.— H. McK. Zeller is located at Hagerstown, 
Md., as agent of the Fidelity Loan Building and 
Investment Association. 

'75. — Dr. J. F. Winchester and Dr. Frederick 
Osgood, '82, have been elected directors of the 
Mass. Veterinary Association. 

'76. — The South Shore Herald in a recent article 
entitled "The Floral Department of the O. C. R. 
R." has the following concerning Mr. G. A. Parker, 
who is in charge of this department at Halifax, 
Mass., "Mr. Parker is certainly the right man in 
the right place." 

'78 — IMr. Lockwood Myrick of Springiield, Mass. 
was in town April 30. 

'78.— J. N. Hall, M. D., 730 Sixteenth St., 
Denver, Col., has been elected Secretary of the 
State Board of Medical Examiners. 

'81.— Chas. F. Boynton, M. D., formerly of Port- 
land, Ore., has changed his address to Buena Vista, 
Ore. 

'82. — A letter has been received from John E. 
Wilder of Chicago. 111., suggesting plans for an M. 
A. C. Headquarters at that city during the Fair but 
as yet, nothing definite has been decided upon. 

'82. — The address of C. A. Bowman has been 
changed from No. 12 Pearl St., to No. 3 Hamilton 
Place, Boston, Mass. 



'82.— Prof. C. S. Plumb of Purdue University, 
has an article in the May number of the Popular 
Science Monthly. 

'83 —Prof. J. B. Lindsey of the Mass. State Ex- 
periment Station is having a series of papers pub- 
lished in Agricultural Science upon "The Compo- 
sition of Wood." 

^—^84. — The address of Llewellyn Smith of the 
Quinnlpiac Fertilizer Co., 92 State St., Boston, was 
given incorrectly in the last issue. It should read, 24 
Wellington St., Worcester, Mass. 

'86. --C. F. W. Felt has been appointed Division 
Engineer of the Northern division of the Gulf, Colo- 
rado, and Santa Fe Railway. His address is 
Cleburne, Texas. 

'87.— Wm. H. Caldwell, Prof, of Agriculture at 
the Pennsylvania State College, will be the expert 
in charge of the Guernsey tests at the Chicago Ex- 
position with headquarters at Barn 2. 

'87. — Edward Barrett has resigned his position 
as principal of the High School at Lee. Mass. 

'88. A. I. Hayward, late of Mamaroneck, West 
Chester county, N. Y., has changed his address 
from the above to Ashby, Mass. 

'88. — Edward E. Knapp has left Steelton, Pa., 
and is expected here this week. 

'90. — F. J. Smith, assistant at the M. A. C. 
Laboratory, Amherst, Mass., is to go to the World's 
Fair as a Demonstrator of Chemistry from this 
college. 

'90. — G. B. Simonds of Ashby, Mass., has ac- 
cepted the position of Assistant Superintendent of 
the Fitchburg Almshouse. He is also a member of 
the Rollstone Church choir. 

'91. — A. G. Fames was recently chosen as a 
member of the Woodruff Six, Senior Oratoricals, at 
Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. We extend our 
congratulations to a former member of the Life 
Board. 

'9z. — G. E. Ta^-lor, manager of last year's base 
ball team, was present at the M. A. C. — Mt. Her- 
mon game Saturday, April 22d. 

'92. — H. C. West, of Belchertown. is engaged in 
the work of the Gypsy Moth Commission. His 
address is Commonwealth Building, Boston. 



1 66 



AGGIE LIFE. 



TWO WOUNDS. 
The room was aglow and the music was dying 

In soft lingering strains at the end of the dance, 
When she lifted her flowers, half laughing, half sighing, 

And gave me right shyly a rose and a glance. 

A tender, blush rose, like the heart of a cupid, 
A glance like the opening of flowers in May. 

But the rose had a thorn and my finger was crimsoned 
And beneath its fair petals a little elf lay. 

She noticed my wound with a sweet perturbation, 
I saw her kind tenderness in a slight start. 

She gave me her kerchief to bind up my finger, 
Ah! What will she give me to bind up my heart? 

— The Hesperus. 

Ima !Ios,g. Ur;i Hogg, and Moore Hogg are the 
names of the childien of Governor Hogg of Texas. 
An exchange remarks that the governor evidently 
believes in tlieold saying, "the whole hog or none." 
— Hiram College Advance. 

Tiie Brown Daily Herald, in a lengthy article, 
proposes that Brown join with Boston Tech, Tufts 
and Trinity, and form a foot-ball league for next 
fall. 

Wilbraham Academy has invited Williston Sem- 
inary to join with her and one other strong academy 
in the vicinity, and form a triangular athletic league. 
Whether this meets wiih success or not the two 
institutions will undoubtedly hold a union field day 
sometime during the coming spring. 

The Dartmouth and College Life are now on our 
exchange list. The Mt. Holyoke and The Polytech- 
nic of Broiiklyn Tech. are as usual of high order, 
and are always welcomed. 

The following from au exchange is too suggestive 
to need explanation : 

Lives of great men oft remind us. 

Honest men won't stand a chance ; 
The more we work, there grow behind us 
Bigger patches on our pants. 

On our pants, once new and glossy. 

Now are stripes of difi'erent hue. 
All because subscribers linger 

And won't pay us what is due. 

Then let us all be up and doing. 

Send your mite, however small, 
Or when the sno tv of winter strikes us 

We shall have no pants at all. 

A school of law is soon to be opened in Tokio for 
Japanese women. — S. U. I. Quill. 



THE COLLEGE EDITOR. 

If only the paper would edit itself 
How happy the board would be ! 
For an editor's work is never done, 
I When other folks finish he's only begun. 

As you can plainly see. 

While gaiety reigns on the college grounds 
The editor keeps aloof. 
His time is precious, for duty calls. 
And hidden within those four brick walls 
Is the uncorrected proof. 

His eyes grow dim as he tries in vain 

To interpret the blotted page, 

For to make a choice between worse and worst. 

And which shall be last and which not first. 

Would puzzle the wisest sage. 

Perchance an idea appears in view, 
He suddenly is inspired, 
But when he attempts to coax it to stay 
It takes to its wings and files away 
And that makes the editor tired. 



Responsibility weighs him down. 

And furrows his brow with care. 

For he feels that the world on him depends, 

And that while his paper assistance lends, 

The college need not despair. 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIAL TV. 



PKOMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIN STREET, 



JfOBTHAMPTON, MA8B. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



167 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 



MMUtl 



" Lamps and Lanip Goods are Ours." 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMBEMST, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED ^i SALE STABLE, 

T. L PAIGE, Prop'R 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMMEBST, MASS. 

J. A.. RAWSOlf , 

DEALER IN 

WflTGHES, GliOCl^S, JEtfEIiRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED "WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

PIE"E STSTIOMERY. 



REPAIRINa MEATLY AMO ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



"Y' 



V) 



H 



K 




.A.3S/II3:EI?,ST, 



iva:.A.£3S. 



H. D. HEMENWAY, 



DEALEK IN 



Student Supplies, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, NOTE BOOKS, WHITE GLOVES, 

POCKET LENSES, STATIONERY, BOTANY 

PRESSES, CONFECTIONERY, 

ETC. 

=PRICES LO\A/.= 

S1 NORTH COLLEGE. 



A High Grade 
A¥heel for a lit- 
tle money. 

Solid Tire, $85. 
, C[isliionTire,$90. 
' Pneumatic 
Tire, $115. 




Send for Catalogue. 



TOR SALE El 

correspondeBce will receive prompt attention.-'®* 



STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 



NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 

ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 

GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 

FIRST CLASS GOODS. PRICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH college:. 



•fH 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

era 

and Carpet Renovating [stablisliment, 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



i68 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes <! Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Slieet Music. 



Music Books, 



Strings 

FOR THE. VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, aud Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 



,(^ DENTISTS. 5), 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CUTLHR'S BLOCK, AMSERST, MA.SS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
e -A.. Ti/L. TO S -p. IvI. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 



ician, 
Watchmaker. 



PINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD wore: WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-offlce. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PHTSICIANS' l-RKSejilPTIONS CARMFVI^LY 
COMPU VNDED, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCENLK ROW. 

Order your ©@il,£ here. 

WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODfiETT & CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



Fqf Ouits and i^all Overcoats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



FINE ITAL AND FAIENCE LAIPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, .$3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, $2.50 AND $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Bulscuit go to 

O. @. COUCM & SON'S. 
FRANK C. PLUMB,. 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

J08EPH Pariseatj, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Rlock, Atnherat^ Mass, 



-L± W 



H 



H 






DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, 

Amtierst House Block, - Amiierst, Mass. 



lE'Xi.^I^ilL^^^CIST'. 



I«0. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 



I* 



1892. 



5. g. DKJHlt^gO^:^, L). D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 
WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



^="Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T THE 



AMHERST GASH SH0E S¥OREi 

You can get tlie most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSOTsT, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



/' 



TAILOR. )^ 



Repairing Neatly Do 



tie. 



Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



NEINA/ SKY LIGHT. 
EINLARGED OPBRATING ROOM. 

CLASS AND SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY. 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



jWilitapy Sait.s and Tfimmings. 



assachusetls Aaricultural Coileae, 







-^^^ >*s«^S-*^-'flW*«?«S^'W#-W- — ^,^jsr^'"' " ^ 



»;,^«s««-'Wa!««ie>*-'«'»--^,,.«««p,5i^ 




d^^^...^.^i.& i.ij^^i .: -..a 



A.ixihe^r*«»t9 I^j;o-«^«»« 



, M, V/X'V^:A_^^^' 



AGGIE LIFE. 



JiMKERBT, MiLSB., MiLY il, iBB3. 



¥0L. III. Md. 15. 



• BRIMIFE'RS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRlCULTURy^L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would iuform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruit*, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS. 



THE mw 

FUtlTUP >ND CARPET 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTEESSES.J ^^ILLO WS, STUDY 
DESKS AND J^HAIRS, LOUNGES. 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



C. H, SANDERSO^i k CO., 



CASH DEALERS IN 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



k Thompsoi^, 



C*SH DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS, 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVERYBODY. 



All Goods STS,ICTI>T CASH and at 

LOWEST PRICES. 

10 PHCENIX ROW, - AMHERST, MASS. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

X^TJSSEIB O-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



K,EFA.IS.iaSIC3- IDOISTE! I=E,OIVCr'TIl.~!£-. 



T. W. SLOAN, 

2 PBOSNIX ROW. 



3. A. 






L^[iirT|Der, 

CAS FSTIER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heating a Specialty. 



AGO 




Lr 1 i jL/ . 



VOL. III. 



AMHP:RST, MASS., MAY 17, 1893. 



No. 15 



Published 'Fortnightly by the Stvidents of the Mass. 
" Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, lOc. 



Entered at the Post Otfice as second-class mail matter. 

nOAJtIt OJF BDITOJiS: 

C. F. WALKER, '94, Editor-in-chief. 

G. H. MEEWIN, '94, Business Manager. 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

F. L. GREENE, '94, T. P. FOLEY, '9.5, 

E. O. BAGG, '95, C. B. LANE, '95, 

E. L. HAYWARD, '96. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communica- 
tions should be addressed Aggie Life, Amuekst Mass. 



It is necessary that all outstanding subscriptions be 
paid at once. Subscribers finding tliis item marlied please 
malie payment to the Business Manager as soon as 
possible. 



A FDLL report of the Field Day exercises held 
this morning and afternoon will be found in the 
Aggie Life Supplement issued witli this number of 
the paper. 



The base-ball management desires a large attend- 
ance from the college at the Williston game next 
Saturday. The trip is quite inexpensive. Let 
every student who can possibly do so accompany the 
team next Saturday. Our games with Williston 
have always been interesting and we are sure that 
this one will prove no exception. 



As the commencement season draws near would 
it not be advisable to have a reconstruction era in 
the so-called reception-room situated in the Tower? 
This is the only room that is available for such pur- 
poses and it seems as if the expenditure of a por- 



tion of an appropriation might be used to excellent 
advantage here. At present the only accommoda- 
tions afforded visitors are a limited number of chairs, 
a lounge, and a few other minor articles. The walls 
are unadorned and the fii'e-place has not even 
andirons to relieve its hlankness. The impression 
received l)y anyone entering the room is far differ- 
ent from that which should be given by a reception- 
room. The location of the room is excellent and 
we would suggest that its interior condition be 
materially improved before commencement 



Although the Freshman-.Sophomore ball game 
passed off without the manifestation of any radical 
class spirit, still we are led to feel that the college 
would be the gainer if class contests and the ensu- 
ing class feeling were m.ade a still less prominent 
featuie of our college life. It is possible to change 
the present state of aflairs, and to gain for our- 
selves not only increased attendance but a higher 
standing among our sister institutions, both in 
scholarship and in athletics. This will only be 
possibly however, when everything is subordinated 
to the best interests of the college as a whole. 
Many, if not all, of the acts on the part of college 
students, which have disgraced their institnlious 
have been instigated by class feeling. Brutal haz- 
ing, wanton destruction of property, rushes and cer- 
tain other demonstrations are all relics of barbarism, 
and by doing away with them we shall be taking a 
step forward. 



The work being done on the college grounds in 
all departments in cleaning up the debris of winter's 
work of desolation should afford us not only object 
lessons in landscape gardening but also an exposi- 
tion of the maxims "Order is Heaven's first law" 
and "Cleanliness is next to godliness." From these 
sayings deduce the conclusion that both order and 
cleanliness are fundamental requisites of beauty. 



170 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Every true friend of the college is willing to help 
enhance the beauty of the grounds and buildings in 
every way possible. The truth of this statement is 
attested by the groves that have been planted by 
successive classes as well as by tht many gifts from 
both students and friends which adorn the grounds. 
The beauty of the place which others are doing 
their best to preserve is sadly marred by pieces of 
paper, banana-skins and other waste articles, in 
themselves, perhaps, trifling, yet in the aggregate 
an eyesore and disfigurement. "There is a place 
for everything" and surely the waste basket is a 
more proper receptacle for such matter than the 
lawn. Nor are such copious droughts of water as 
are sometimes poured from the windows conducive 
to the good health of grass. A word to the wise is 
sufHcient. 



As the season of commencement approaches, the 
manner in which Freshman night is to be celebrated 
again becomes a matter of speculation to the unini- 
tiated. Will the example set by '95 be followed 
or will a return be made to the old custom of riot 
and fight all night? Of course the Freshmen are 
the principal parties interested but it is, neverthe- 
less, a matter of concern to every member of the 
college. While the simple celebration of Freshman 
Night is no criterion of the moral and mental status 
of the student body, it is indicative to a large ex- 
tent of what is allowed and tolerated and becomes a 
standard as it were of the character of the students. 
And disorder on the grounds and chaos iu the build- 
ings not to speak of the demoralized condition of 
the two lower classes is certainly no satisfactory in- 
dication of the general condition of the college. 
Of course there can be no rule set down for the 
celebration. It would not be followed if there 
were one. But whatever plan is adopted the mana. 
gers of the event should see to it that nothing be 
done by the freshman class that night which will 
give to visitors or friends false impressions of the 
general behavior of the students. -'While we read 
history we make history ;" and the history that we 
make is uf far more importance than the history we 
read. No event, however insignificant it appears, 
is wholly without weight and influence for right or 
wrong and these celebrations are far reaching in 
their importance. We sincerely hope that the man- 



agers of the affair may adopt some plan which will 
show at once the ''metal of which they are made," 
and their allegiance to the best interests of the 
college. 



©ntrril 



A SUNRISE IN THE MOUNTAINS. 

It is early morning, and still quite dark, when 
our expedition sets forth lo scale the loft3" heights 
of Satoolah, a neighboring mountain. Soon, how- 
ever, objects begin to wear the peculiar gray of the 
dawn and ere long resume their natural forms and 
colors in the increasing light of day. 

After an exhileratiug climb of some length up the 
steep sides of the mountain, we are fairly out of 
breath and stop to rest a while on a broad level spot 
before ascending to the highest point. The faint 
rosy tint which was at flrst reflected to the ej'e from 
the eastern horizon is now seen to suffuse the whole 
sky half way up to the zenith with crimson. Not 
daring lo wait longer we hasten to the summit, 
and are soon absorbed in contemplation of those 
scenes of which one seems never to tire. The great 
blue mountains rise majestically upon every side, 
either singly, or in groups, or yet again trending 
away m ranges to the north and west until hidden 
from view b\" the descending vault of heaven ; while 
in the south .and southeast they become less and less 
gigantic, gradually giving place to hills and the gen- 
tle undulations of the lowlands which, in turn, be- 
come indistinguishable from the azure of the sky. 

But what fills the valleys and basins far below us 
making thein look so like the calm waters of a lake ? 
Surely it cannot be that those are bodies of water. 
If so, we have never heard of their existence. And 
while wondering still upon this mystery, the wind, 
which had been blowing more or less all the while 
since we gained the top, suddenly strikes us with all 
the fury of a gale nearly lifting us from our feet ; 
as if by magic the mountains, lowlands, lakes, -- 
everything but our own forms and the rock beneath 
are hidden from view ! A vapor cold and damp 
envelopes us ; faces and clothing become wet as if 
by dew ; we are literally in the clouds. It is be- 
coming decidedly uucomfortalile when a sudden gust 
makes a rift in the cloud and we catch a glimpse of 
the skv in the east all radiant with the light of the 



AGGIE LIFE. 



171 



approaching sun ; but the cloud closes over it again. 
Discouragement now has the best of us for awhile 
and murmurings of discontent are heard, particularly 
from the feminine half of the party, when, as sud- 
denly as before, a mountain iu the north bursts into 
view and is almost instantly swallowed up by the 
rapacious mists. The next instant auother comes 
into view and disappears. Repeatedly, now, the 
veering wmd briuos out the mountains and the next 
instant hides them ; but, at last, it tries to hide 
them in vain, while, dripping with dampness, and 
with many a jest at the others' odd appearance, we 
are permitted to observe with enkindling interest 
the changing hues of the brightening skies. 

A ragged bank of cloud on the horizon shows 
golden from the sun below ; another towards the 
south, of apparently the same nature, has a very 
peculiar purple color ; and still another, to the north, 
has a leaden hue. While we wait the changing 
colors become brighter and brighter and a glimpse 
of the sun itself is caught through a chink in the 
cloudy mass. Then from a long narrow opening in 
the midst of the cloud an edge of the sun's disk is 
seen growing wider and wider, then narrower and 
narrower, till it is entirely lost to view. But the 
sun rapidly approaches the top of this barrier and 
quickly an edge is seen above, broadening till it 
looks like an inverted golden saucer — then a semi- 
circular ball of fire, increasing in size until the per- 
fect sun, the lord of day, leaps clear of the cloud 
glowing with light and heat. Gradually the bril- 
liant color becomes less bright and fades away and 
the cloud itself melts before the sun as he mounts 
higher in the heavens ; while the lingeriui; fragments 
of mist brought down by the wind are also quickly 
chased away. 

But, yonder, in the shadow of a mountain, vainly 
trying to regain its former place in the sky from 
whence it has been hurled by the cruel wind, is a 
little cloud, deserted, companionless. See ! It is 
slowly creeping, creeping up the precipitous slope 
till it has nearly reached the top when it slips down, 
down to the valley again. Again and again it 
slowly rises, and again and again the desired goal 
is almost attained, but at the critical moment it loses 
its mysterious hold and falls down to the denser 
atmosphere of the valley. At last the powerful rays 
of the sun strike full upon it dispersing it like 



smoke. This, too, was the fate of our phantom 
lakes — for such they were — whose mists vanished 
in the air under the same mighty influence. 

We now retraced our steps with light hearts, and 
lighter stomachs, yet each bearing in the mind an 
impress of those beautiful scenes ; some in the joys 
and sorrows of life soon to forget, some perhaps to 
cherish forever the sweet lesions of hope and patient 
perseverence learned from Nature herself that sum- 
mer morn. 

E. D. w. 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY AND M. A. C. 

As Commencement Day draws near, the coming 
graduate learns, perhaps for the first time, that he 
will be privileged to carry away with him either one, 
two, or three diplomas. He feels in duty bound to 
take a College diploma ; he thinks a military 
diploma may be of some service in the future ; and 
then, to complete the trio, a diploma from Boston 
University becomes one of his cherished posessions. 
The query may arise in his mind, and perhaps in 
the minds of others, why so large a university in so 
distant a city should take cognizance of him. 

Boston University, as its name implies, is located 
in the city of Boston. Its charter was approved by the 
Governor May 26, 1869. Its departments consist 
of two general classes. Those which presuppose on 
the part of the student a previous collegiate training 
are called schools ; and those which do not are called 
colleges. The schools are the School of Theology, 
opened in 1871 ; the School of Law, opened in 1872 ; 
the School of Ifedicine, opened in 1873 ; and the 
School of All Sciences, opened in 1874. The first 
undergraduate department was the College of Music, 
opened in 1872 ; followed by the College of Liberal 
Arts in 1873 ; and the College of Agriculture in 1875. 

In the original statutes of organization provision 
was made for a College of Agriculture, but, owing 
to the financial situation after the great fire of 1872 
and the willingness on the part of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College to furnish instruction of 
the kind desired and to co-operate with the Univer- 
sity in the promotion of ils aim in this direction, 
the University decided to secure alliance with the 
College and not to establish an independent School 
of Agriculture. 

The necessary articles of agreement were pre- 



172 



AGGIE LIFE. 



sented to the Trustees of the College by President 
Clark aud adopted by them January 14, 1875 ; and 
they were unanimously ratified by the Trustees of 
the University February 11, following. 

The College on its part agrees that matriculants 
in Boston University desiring to pursue any regular 
or special course of instruction presented in the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College shall be at lib- 
erty to do so on the same terms as other persons and 
on completing the course to the satisfaction of the 
authorities of both institutions shall be entitled to 
take their appropriate degree, either at the hands of 
the College or from the University or both as they 
may prefer. The University on its part agrees that 
so long as this alliance is found satisfactory it will 
refrain from organizing an independent College of 
Agriculture and will give its cordial support and 
influence to the building up of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College ; that it will by its annual cir- 
culars and official correspondence publicly aud pri- 
vately recommend those seeking an agricultural 
education to resort for it to the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College ; and that it will publish in connec- 
tion with its annual catalogues such statements of 
the advantages of the College as may be agreed 
upon by the presidents of the two institutions. Both 
parties agree that to promote a good understanding 
each shall have the privilege of representing its in- 
terests by a duly accredited officer or committee in 
the business meetings of the other ; and that either 
party to this agreement shall have power to ter- 
minate it at the close of any scholastic year by giv- 
ing notice of such desire and intent one year 
previously. 

That the University is keeping its pari of the 
agreement is illustrated by the following quotations 
from the report of its president in January last : 
"In the eighteen years which have elapsed, the 
alliance has greatly contributed to the mutual advan- 
tage. At no time has anything occurred to mar the 
cordiality of the relationship, or to weaken the 
effectiveness of the cooperation." 

Also, "The College of Agriculture was never in 
so effective a condition as now. Appropriately 
fostered by the state and national authorites, it is 
rapidly assuming the position and accomplishing 
the purposes in the hope of which its Ibuiiders lived 
and labored." It may also be- illustrated by the 



fact that the last report of the president devotes 
three pages, and the last year book fifteen pages to 
the interests of the College of Agriculture. 

In closing it may be well to call attention to a few 
facts illustrating the scope and work of the Univer- 
sity. The last annual report of the Treasurer 
shows the excess of assets over liabilities to be 
$1,518,796.47. The total number of students in all 
departments is 1,075 ; 759 men and 316 women, rep- 
resenting thirty-six of the states and territories of 
the United States and twenty-one foreign countries. 
This University was the first ever organized from 
the outset aud throughout on a basis of perfect 
equality for men and women. In the eighteen 
years of its life 9,422 men and 3,178 women, or a 
total of 12,600 persons, have been connected with 
it. 

President Warren, who has done so much to make 
the University a success, brings his last report to a 
close with the following vrords : "The history of 
Boston University thus far calls for devout grati- 
tude. May the thanksgiving of its friends become 
substantial thank-offerings. And may every like 
period of its future liistor3be signalized by an equal 
prosperity " 

F. H. Fowler, '87. 



BASEBALL. 



M. A. C. 25 ; TRINITY, 7. 

The college team had a complete walkover in the 
Trinity game at Flartford, May 13, defeating them 
25 to 7. Aggie's teamwork was first class ; despite 
the driving rain they played like old timers. 
C'urley pitched his first game of the season strikhig 
out nine men and giving but four men bases on 
balls ; a remarkable record under the unfavorable 
condition of weather. Bowie, the Trinity twirler, 
who recently appeared such a puzzle to the Fordham 
and New York College teams, was batted very free- 
ly and after Aggie had pounded out 13 runs in the 
four innings he was forced to retire in favor of 
Dingwall, who proved just as easy game. Trinity 
was first at the bat, and Broughton succeeded in 
scoring, but Aggie was more lucky and through 
errors secured three runs. The fourth and sixth 
innings proved disastrous to Trinity as Aggie scored 
13 runs with little effort. In the sixth Trinity 



AGGIE LIFE. 



173 



awoke from her stupoi enough to secure three runs 
on a single and two errors. 

The features of the game ou the Aggie side were 
quite numerous, the battery work and the hitting 
was of high order, while a difficult running catch of 
F. Read called forth tremendous applause from the 
grand stand. 

In the fourth inning Bagg was severely injured 
by a base runner, and H. Read was substituted and 
quite ably filled his place. Leamy's work at third 
was worthy of much praise. 

A curious fact in regard to the game was that 
with one exception Aggie secured her runs after 
two men were out, when the bases were empty ; 
then the boys played ball. In the seventh inning 
Aggie was shut out but scored in all the others. 

For Trinity, Dingwall, Cullen and Peck played 
the best game. 

The coaching and base running of Aggie should 
be severely criticised ; also the failure of the fielders 
to play the ball to second on a hit with a man on 
first. These weak points tell heavily on our score 
in every game. 

The score : 



F. Eead, ss, 
W. Curley, c, 
Sullivan, rf, 

G. Cm-ley, p, 
Clark, 2b, 
Leamy, 3b, 
H. Eead, lb, 
Bagg, lb, 
Howard, cf, 
Jones, If, 



M. A. c. 

A E 

5 
6 
7 
5 
3 
5 
2 
3 
5 
4 



H 


p 


A 


B 


1 


1 


2 


1 





11 


1 




















3 


9 








3 


1 





1 


3 











3 


1 








2 





2 





1 


2 











C 


1 



Eead, Leamy, Broughton 2, Langtord 2, Young 2, Cullen 2, Peck. 
Passed balls— Peck 5. Wild pitches— Bowie, Curley, Dingwall. 
Time— 2h. ISm. Umpire— Lehnert, '93. Scorer— T. F. Keitii. 

M. A. c. '95, 9; M. A. c. '96, 4. 
The sophomore class nine defeated that of the 
freshman in the class game held last Thursday. The 
game was devoid of brilliant plays by either team. 
The oppressive heat caused the majority of specta- 
tors to seek the shade afforded by the building, and 
as a result the systematic cheering by each class, 
that has been so prominent in other class games, 
was almost entirelj' lacking. The score : 

M. A. C, '95. 

AB K BH TB SH PO A E 
5 2 
i 1 



E^ S. Jones, If, 
Sullivan, rf, 
E. H. Clark, 2b, 
Burgess, 3b, 
Toole, lb, 
Stevens, ss, 
Bagg, c, 
Crehore, cf, 
H. B. Eead, p. 

Total, 



F. H. Eead, p, 
W. J. Curley, c, 
Marshall, lb, 
Pentecost, 2b, 
Leamy, 3b, 
Vaughan, ss, 
Nichols, If, 
Harper, cf , 
Bunington, rf, 



2 


3 

12 



33 


9 


10 


15 


1 


27 


20 


2 


H. A. C, 


'96. 














AB 


R 


IB 


TE 


SH 


p 


A 


B 


* 


3 


3 


3 





1 


S 





3 





2 


4 





8 


5 





i 





1 


1 





9 





1 


3 














1 


1 


2 


5 





1 


1 





4 


2 


2 


i 




















1 


3 




















1 


3 














1 








3 


1 





















24 16 



Total, 


45 


25 


14 


17 





27 


19 


4 




TKINITT. 
















A B 


K 


IE 


T B 


S H 


PO 


A 


E 


Broughton, ss. 


4 


1 


1 


1 








3 


2 


Dingwall, 2b, p, 


5 


2 


1 


3 





i> 


7 


3 


Bowie, p, 2b, 


5 











1 


6 


3 


2 


Langford, If, 


5 





1 


1 











3 


Young, cf , 


4 























Cullen, rf , 


5 


1 


2 


2 











1 


Strawbridge, lb. 


2 


2 


1 


1 





10 








Peck, c. 


4 


1 


2 


2 





5 


1 





Monagan, 3b, 


4 





2 


2 


1 


1 





3 



2 









Total, 

Innings, 
M. A. C, '95, 
M. A. C, '96, 

Earned runs — Ninety-five 3, Ninety-six 2. Two-base hits — Sulli- 
van, Toole, Crehore, Curley 2. Three-base hit — Eead '95. Stolen 
bases— Jones 2, Sullivan 2, Clark, Toole, Bagg 2, Eead '95, Eead '96 
6, Curley, Leamy, Harper, Bunington 2. First base on balls— By 
Eead '95, Eead '96, Curley 2, Pentecost 4, Burrington, Harper 2, Sul- 
livan. First base on errors— Jones 3, Clark, Bagg 2, Eead '95. 
Struck out— By Eead '9S, Pentecost 2, Harper 2, Leamy, Vaughan; 
Marshall, Nichols, Bunington 2, by Eead '96, Burgess, Stevens 4 
Toole, Eead '95, Sullivan, Jones, Crehore 2. Passed baUs- Bagg 2, 
Curley 2. Hit by pitched ball— Nichols, Marshall. Time— 2h. 10m. 
Umpires — Lehnert '93, Curley '93, Dickinson '94. Scorer — T. S 
Bacon. 



Total, 38 

Innings, 12 3 

M. A. C, 3 2 2 

Trinity, 110 

Earned runs — Aggie 6, Trinity 3. 



r 10 13 3 24 14 13 
4 5 6 7 8 9 
6 17 4 —25 

10 3 1 0—7 
"Three-base hit — Dingwall 



Two-base hits — F. Eead, W. Curley, Clark. Stolen bases— Sullivan 
2, G. Curley 2, Clark, Leamy, Jones 2, Howard, Y"oung, Broughton, 
First base on balls— Broughton, Young, Strawbridge 2, F. Eead, W. 
Curley, G. Curley, Clark 3, Leamy, H. Eead, Howard. Hit by 
pitched ball— F. Eead, Strawbridge. Struck out— W. Curley, H. 



1-3: 127:1. 



Fs. 1 :l-3. G. H. 



T. M. G. A. TOPICS 
May 18. — Trust in the Lord. Ps. 125 

H. P. Smead. 
May 21. — Christian Growth 

Blerwin. 
May 25. — Fray Without Ceasing. I Thess 

18 ; Luke 18 :1. Joseph Baker. 
May 28.— God's Goodness. Ps. 103 :l-4. E. 

White. 



5:17, 



D. 



174 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Collect l^o-tfs- 



—Sound Off! 

— There were no flies on drill ! 

— Smead, '94, went home May 6. 

— And once more the lawn mower. 

— Marsh, '95, was home last week. 

— Kinsman, '96, was home last week. 

— S. F. Howard, '94, spent Saturday and Sunday 
at his home. 

— E. J. Walker, '93, has been spending a few 
days at his home. 

— S. L. Morse, '96, has left college for the re- 
mainder of the term. 

— Sanderson, '94, leaves May 26, to take up his 
work for the summer. 

— The baud has been engaged to furnish music in 
town on Memorial day. 

— Prof. C. S. Walker was one of the judges at 
the Lester Prize Speaking. 

— Two new marker's flags have been purchased 
by the military department. 

— F. D. Robinson, '96, cut his foot quite severely 
with broken glass last Saturday morning. He has 
gone home to recuperate. 

— Burrington, '96, spent a few days at home 
recently, and rettu'ned with a colt to which he is 
devoting his spare moments. 

— Quite extensive alterations are being made in 
the arrangement of the grounds around the Durfee 
plant house. The work of improving is still being 
carried on within. 

— There will probably be new instructors in 
botany, English, mathematics, agriculture and 
chemistry to assist in carrying out the new course 
of study next term. 

— A letter lately received from a member of the 
college at the Columbian Eixposition states that 
wages are good, work is easy, and the boys are 
having a good time. 

— The museum of Natural History is once more 
open to visitors, the hours being from 3 to 4 p. m. 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and F'riday. L. M. 
Barker, '94, has charge. 



— Measles ! 

—The score : M. A. C. 2.5 ; Trinity 7. 

— A. B. Cook, '96, spent Sunday at home. 

— Mid-term "exams" were held last week. 

— Eead, '96, was at home May 6th and 7th. 

— Mr. C. G. Morehouse of Darien, Conn., was 
the guest of Prof. Walker over Sunday. 

— Three and possibly four committees from the 
legislature will inspect the college to-morrow. 

— The college appropriation bill is still in the 
hands of the treasury committee of the Senate. 

— All the runs credited to the college team in the 
Trinity game were made after two men were out. 

— Lient. Dickinson acted as judge at the Lincoln 
Prize Exhibition at the Pratt gymnasium last week. 

— E. A. Hawks. '93, was suddenly called to his 
home tlie first of the month by the illness of his 
father. 

— Rev. R. C. Bell of the Congregational church 
in Granby will occupy the college pulpit next 
Sunday. 

— The Junior class has finished the study of elec- 
tricity, and will hereafter devote more time to en- 
tomology. 

— Dirty guns and equipments will be reported at 
company inspection hereafter. Look out for 
demerits. 

— E. E. Kuapp, '88, has presented the chemical 
laboratory with a number of fine mineralogical spec- 
imens brought from Pennsylvania. 

— The Athletic management has arranged to have 
barges run between the college and Hampshire Park 
for the Field day exercises to-day. 

— Professor Fernald has recently received a 
horned toad from Lieut. L. W. Cornish, who sent 
the living specimen from Indian Territory. 

— Quite a ilelegation from the college attended 
the meeting of the Amherst Christian Endeavor 
Local Union, held at No. Amherst, May 10. 

— Lieut. Dickinson has accepted the invitation of 
E. M. Stanton Post 147, G. A. E., to the college 
battalion to do escort duty on Memorial Day. 

— The unusually large number of absences from 
military drill the last few weeks have interfered 
considerably with the excellence of the exercise. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



175 



— Williston game next Saturday at Easthampton. 

— Harry G. Stockwell, '94, has been somewhat 
improverl during the past week. 

— Rawsou, '96, was suddenly called home last 
week. He returned last Monday. 

— Baruum and Bailey's Greatest .Show on Eavlh 
at Hamp., June 3. See the Elephant ! 

— H. J. Fowler, '94, has procured samples of 
the photographs iocluJed in the college exhibit at 
Chicago. They may be seen at No. 13 South 
College. 

— Those who took the trij) to Hartford report a 
good time in spite of the weather. It rained stead- 
ily during most of the game but this drawback dirt 
not make the playing devoiii of interest. The train 
reached home about 11.00 p. u. and was welcomed 
with enthusiasm. The only unfortunate occurrence 
was the serious injury- of Bagg, '95. by a base run- 
ner. He was removed to the home of Manager 
Goodrich where he is receiving the best of care and 
attention. 

— Through the efforts of Pres. Goodell of the 
college and Fies. Wilder of the Western Alumni 
Association the Massachusetts Columbian Commis- 
sion has given the coilet>;e permission to use the 
State buildiug as a rendezvous for students, alumni 
and members of the faculty. Although the use of 
a separate room could not be secured certain hours 
will be set apart for the exclusive use of the college. 
A circular letter regarding the matter will soon be 
issued by those in charge. 

— For some time a rumor has been current that 
the college uniform was once more to be c;hauged 
and the West Point gray to be substituted for the 
blue now worn by the battalion. No definite action 
has as yet been taken toward making the change. 
Two years ago when the present uniform was 
adopted, it was done by vote of the trustees, acting 
upon the recommendation of Lieut. Cornish who 
was supported bj' the faculty. Probably such a 
course will again be necessary if another change is 
to be made. The present uniform is unsatisfactory 
in many respects ; whether better results could be 
obtained by again adopting the gray than could be 
secured by altering the uniform now in use is an 
open question. The opinion of the student body is 
desired. 



— Now is the time to purchase college views. 

— Day, '96, is at his home suffering from an attack 
of the measles, He is missed in base-ball circles. 
Leamy, '96, is supplying 3d base during his 
ai)sence. 

— The foot-ball management means business. 
Light practice is being held afternoons and is quite 
successful. Several new men have commenced 
training. 

— Ml'. Leonard Metcalf of Boston who had cliarge 
of the construction of the dam last fall was in town 
last week, preparing the botanic path for grading. 
Although the work laid out is quite extensive, it 
will be completed by commencement. 

— -There must be better ventilation in No. Col- 
lege. Cannot the glass sky-liglits be made to ad- 
mit fresh air as well as sunlight? Doubtless the 
matter will be fully remeilied in time, but some 
temporary' relief should be provided at once. 

— May 10 was gala day Lit .Amherst college. The 
Lincoln Prize Exhibition was held in the Pratt 
gymnasium at 1.30. Later in the afternoon occurred 
the Amherst-Williams game, followed in the even- 
ing by the Lester Prize Speaking, by members of 
the Junior class. 

— Estimates have lately been made for construct- 
ing new concrete walks on the college grounds. We 
hope the condition of the road way between North 
College and the Boarding House will not be over- 
looked by those who have the matter in charge. 
Walks at the plant house are an ornament to the 
grounds and a convenience to visitors ; a walk to 
the Boarding House would be used three times a 
day by over half the entire college. 

— The commencement speakers from the senior 
class and the subjects of their theses are as fol- 
lows : F. T. Harlow, "The Successful Farmer of 
the Future"; H.J.Harlow, "'Transformation of 
New England" ; F. H. Henderson, "Immigration 
into the United States" ; E. C. Howard, "The Mis- 
sion of the Agitator" ; F. S. Hoyt, "Popular Edu- 
cation the Hope of Our Country" ; A. E. Melendy, 
"A Duty Neglected" ; F. A. Smith, "A Plea for 
Forestry Legislation" ; L. W. Smith, "Economic 
Value of Good Roads." E. C. Howard will repre- 
sent the College at the Boston University Com- 
mencement. 



176 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— May 11. Battalion Parade. Rest! — for the 
weary. 

— Word having been received from Chicago that 
one more photograph will be admitted in the Col- 
lege collection, it was decided that the Fire Brigade 
would fill the bill. 

— The flag-staff has again taxed the patience of 
the Quartermaster. We sincerely hope that a new 
staff will be furnished before long. Th< present 
one has outlived its usefulness. 

— Mr. K. S. Thabue, B. S., of Bassein, Burmah, 
will take a post graduate course in Horticulture at 
the college. He lias been in this country about 
eighteen years during which time he has taken 
courses in a number of educational institutions, in- 
cluding the Michigan State Agricultural College of 
which he is a graduate. 

During the night of May 3 the Connecticut 

Valley was traversed by a severe tempest. Over 
two inches of rain fell while the wind blew with a 
velocity of 70 miles au hour. Considerable damage 
was done in other parts of the town, but with the 
exception of a few slates blown from the roofs, the 
college suffered but little. 

— The next game is at Easthampton with Willis- 
ton Seminary. It is hoped that every student who 
can posfibly rio so will accompany the team on this 
trip. The atmosphere on the other side of the river 
is said to be peculiarly conducive to enthusiasm, so 
let us have good rousing cheers for Aggie on the 
Williston diamond nest Saturday ! 

— At a meeting of the Boarding Club held May 
12, the following officers were elected for next 
fall term: 1st director and business manager, 
H. C. Burringtou ; 2d director and vice president, 
H. M. Fowler; 3d director, sec'y and treas., Jas- 
per Marsh ; 4ih director, A. J. Morse ; 5th direc- 
tor, C. H. Spaulding; 6th director, W. J. Curley ; 
7th director, W. L. Morse. 

During the past year 2,214,800 pages of read- 
ing matter have been distributed throughout the 
country by the Hatch Experiment Station, as fol- 
lows : four quarterly bulletins, edition 12,000, 
1,608,000 pages; monthly meteorological bulletin 
with annual summary, edition 400,19,600 pages; 
special bulletin, edition, 36,000, 576,000 pages ; 
annual report, edition 400, 112,000 pages. 



—I. C. Green, '94, is a contributor to the Observer 
upon ornithological subjects. 

— The doubles of the tennis tournament must all 
be played by 6 p. m.. May 20. 

— The Convention of the Grand Lodge, Q. T. V., 
will be held Thursday and Friday, May 18 and 19, 
at tlie United States Hotel, Boston. A banquet 
will be held Friday evening. The local chapter of 
the fraternity will be represented by A. E. Melendy, 
'93, L. H. Bacon, '94, F. L. Warren, '95. 



MAY TIME. 

As one enjoys the sights and sounds of these 
beautiful days, he no longer wonders that the poets 
are so fond of singing the praises of spring-time. 

The heat-giving, life-bringing rays of the sun 
have at last unlocked the prison doors of the fabled 
Proserpine and she has come forth from her under- 
ground home arrayed in her ever new mantle of 
beauty to revel in the brief season of liberty allowed 
her by her sombre captor. At her bidding the 
larches have robed themselves in delicate fringes of 
beautiful green, the graceful birches are decked out 
in lustrous foliage and even the evergreen spruces 
are puttiug forth growing buds that in their lightness 
of color harmonize with the season's buoyancy. 

The earth's carpet of green and the clear azure 
of the firmament backed by the passing clouds make 
up the setting and ground work in which this great- 
est of all artists displays her tints and shadings. 
These latter are by no means confined to variations 
of the colors seen in the center of the solar spec- 
trum, nor are all her effects produced by color alone. 
Every shade from the rich yellow of the golden bell 
to the modest blue of the violets, from the delicate 
pink of the double cherry blossom to the brilliant hues 
of the tulips fiud its appropriate place in the master- 
piece and are fittingly contrasted with beauties of 
form in leaf, flower and plant. 

Eispecially beautiful are the maples as they unfold 
their graceful, many-formed leaves. What among 
all our trees possesses such quiet perfectness of 
form and beauty as does the silver maple? And 
where are there leaves more beautiful iu shape, 
shading and texture than those of the Japanese 
maples ? 

At this season the early magnolias are in their 



AGGIE LIFE- 



177 



prime covered with large brilliant-hued blossoms. 
The delicate spireas are coming into their short 
blooming season while stray strawberry blossoms 
give promise of the speedy arrival of tliat most 
delicious fruit. 

The summery sun begins to tempt the butterflies 
forth from their hiding-places and the birds aie 
joyously singing their love songs or guarding with 
patient watchfulness the nests wherein lie all their 
hopes. The year seems rejoicing in its youth and 
all Nature's forces are working together in prepara- 
tion for the time of her coming glory, the month of 
June. 



The Alumni Tax ($1.00 yearly) for the years 
1892 and 1893 will now be thaakfully received by 
the Treasurer, Amiierst, Mass. Several of the 
alumni have paid for one of these years, others for 
both, and still others for years to come. Such will, 
of course, respond or not respond accordingly. It 
is hoped that by this notice a sufflcient fund may be 
collected for the marking of Class Blemorials. 

'72. — E. B. Smead, Principal of the Watkinson 
Farm School of Hartford, Conn., has just returned 
from a trip to the South Islands. 

'75. — Rev. Henry Hague of South Worcester, 
Mass., paid a short visit to the college last week. 

'78.— It is expected that, Prof. H. E. Stockbridge 
of Fargo, North Dakota, will be presenfat the com- 
mencement exercises. 

'82. — 6. D. Howe, of North Hadley welcomed a 
boy into his family last week. 

'82. — The article entitled "How Science is Help- 
ing the Farmer," by Prof. C. S. Plumb of the 
Indiana Agricultural Experiment Station has been 
reprinted in pamphlet form from the Popular 
Science Monthly. 

'86. — D. F. Carpenter, formerly an instructor 
here, visited the college last Monday. 

'88.— Dr. H. P. Rogers, ex-'88, of Allston, was 
united in marriage to Miss R. S. Davis, Thursday, 
May 4th. E. Rogers, '92, brother of the groom, 
acted as best man, 

'88. — E. E. Knapp, formerly of Steelton, Pa., has 
been visiting here the past week. From here he in- 
tends to go to Franklin, Mass. 



'91. — W. C. Paige, at present attending the School 
of Christian Workers at Chicago, represented that 
institution as a delegate to the Y. M. C. A. Con- 
ventions held at Louisville, Ky., and Indianapolis, 
Ind., last week. 

'91. — E. P. Felt has been elected an honorary 
member of Sigma Xi fraternity at Cornell Uni- 
versity, Ithaca, N. Y. This fraternity elects mem- 
bers from among the students who have made dis- 
tinguished records in scholarship in the scientific 
departments. Again we extend our congratulations 
to a former member of the Life Board. 

'92. — James E. Deuel is located at No. 148 Dud- 
ley St., Boston. 

Ex-'94. — A. R. Streeter visited the college last 
week. 

Es-'95. — A. Davis of West Roxbury, spent Sat- 
urday and Sunday at the college. He was a for- 
mer member of the Life bonrd. 



CO-ED UOA TION IN AMERIGANCOLLEOES. 
To the friends of impartial educational privileges 
the past few months have been full of interest. 
Startling announcements have crowded one upon 
another. In six months time every university in 
staid Scotland, following one after another the ex- 
ample of St. Andrews, threw r-iue its gates to 
vs^omen. Conservative Yale at one stroke opened, 
in like manner, all its graduate courses and enrolled 
between twenty and thirty college women as candi- 
dates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The 
University of Pennsylvania placed itself upon the 
same platform, and with great rejoicing dedicated 
its new cottages to the service of women. Tufts 
College destroyed every discriminating barrier, even 
at the portal of its Divinity School. Wabash Col- 
lege unconditionally surrendered. Brown Univers- 
ity caught the new spirit and left its fractional char- 
acter behind. Columbia, the pride of New York 
City, did the same. The Johns Hopkins accepted 
new funds for a School of Medicine, covenanting 
that the same should forever be open to men and 
women on terms of perfect equality. The American 
University in Washington, the Leland Stanford in 
California, the new University of Chicago, all fol- 
lowed the example first set in Boston, organizing 
from the start upon the just and humanizing princi- 
ples of consistent co-education. — B. U. Year Book. 



178 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The Purdue Exponent has lurnished us with a 
new idea. It states that two hundred enthusiastic 
students of Leiaud Stanford have each given $2.50 
toward the construction of a "noise-making machine" 
to be used at the next athletic contest between 
Leland Stanford and the Univ. of California. It 
was to be a monster horn made of galvanized iron 
and worked by a steam blower. It was 50 feet in 
length, 10 feet in diameter, with a 32-horse power 
boiler. 

The Hiram College Advance speaks very highly 
of the lady base-ball team of that institution. The 
editor writes that the features of the last game were 
a dandy three base hit and a phenomenal slide to 
second. 

AN APOLOGY. 

Forgive me, love, if I amiss 
The other evening stole a kiss ; 
But that sweet smiling face of thine, 
Wreathed with its tresses soft and fine, 
Was just a bit too close for mine. 

You know you raised your head to hear 
What I was whispering in your ear, 
When in an i'^sitant our lips met ; 
Sweet mcr' uries of it linger yet ; 
Sometimes, you kuow, love will forget. 

— Nassau Lit. 

Less than one per cent, of the voters of the 
United States are college graduates, yet they hold 
over fifty per cent of the highest offices. 

The most recent invasion of masculine fields of 
occupation has occurred at Tufts college, where a 
co-ed was duly elected by the Senior class as foot- 
ball manager. 

The number of "cuts" allowed in some of the 
leading colleges is as follows : Yale, 24 per year to 
Juniors and ^euiors, to Sophomores and Freshmen, 
18; Williams, 36, Dartmouth, 21. At Amherst 
and Wesieyan, a student must be present at niue- 
tenths of the recitations. 

One of our exchanges has a sophomore for editor 
in-chief, a junior for local editor, a senior for busi- 
ness manager, and an alumnus for exchange editor. 
By analou'y we come to the concluson that the pres. 
ident of the institution is the "printer's devil." — 
College Life. 



Oberlin was the first college in the world to ad- 
mit women on the same plane as men, and opened 
its doors to the negroes 28 years before their eman- 
cipation. 

President Gates of Amherst has been invited to 
open the international conference at the Chicago 
Exposition. — Brown Daily Herald. 

In a class light between "95 and '96 of Berkely, 
thirty freshmen tied up twenty-five sophomores and 
took their photos. 

When you cau write a merry jest 

Cut it short ; 
It will be too long at best 

Cut it short. 
Life is brief and full of care ; 
Editors don't like to swear. 
Treat youi- poem like your hair 
Cut it short. 

—Ex. 

A literary Frenchman, after studying English for 
a few months, wrote to an American friend: "In 
small time I can learn so many English I will come 
to the America and go on the scaffold to lecture." 
— Hiram College Advance. 



e s 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLAHE, 



108 MAIN STREET, - NOBTBAMfTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



179 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
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Heal 



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WITjIjIAMS' block, A3IMMRSI, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED i SALE STABLE, 

T. L. PAIGE', Prop'r 



H, D. HEMENWAY, 



DEALER IN 



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POCKET LENSES, STATIONERY, BOTANY 

PRESSES, CONFECTIONERY, 

ETC. 

^PRICES LOW. 

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HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

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FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

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AXMEBST, 3IASS. 



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REPASRIWG fiEATLY A^O ROMPTLY DONE. 

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'Y' 



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M^ Solid Tire, $85. 
■^ ' y,CusliiooTire,$90. 
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M I- I 1 

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Siei qUS D 



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aod Carpet Renovating EstalJlislinient. 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWfi!, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
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IN TOWN AT 



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lasic Books, 



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Hair Dressing Rooms. 

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FERD. FANEUF 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



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T. G. HUNTI]^GTON, D. D. S. 

CUTZEK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
e .A.. T^/L. TO 5 F. H/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



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COMFO UNI) ED, 

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Order your C©i^£ here. 



1^. -1^. C STTJIDElNrTS 

WILL FIND STUDENT HBADQUAKTERS FOR 

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ODGETT & CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



For Suits and Fall OvarGoats 

CALL AT OUR STOKE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



Fli METAL AND FAIENCE LAIPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, .$3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, §2.50 and $3.00. 

For Fine Frnit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O. G. COUCM & SON'S. 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseau, 

EAZOES HONED. 
Wood's House, Amhekst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, A-mherat, Mass. 



-L-L v^^ 



in 



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DEUEL'S DRUG STURE 



Amherst House Block, 



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NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, . ■ AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drupes and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

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TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Ei lies. 

Sunday and niglit calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1S50. 



1892. 



THE PHOTO B MJIFHBR. 

NEW SKY LIGHT. 
ENLARGED OPERATING ROOM. 

CLASS AND SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY, 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



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Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



^^Ether and Nitrons Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



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AMHERST GASH SH8E1 STQREi 

Yuu can set ttie most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



A. GLir 



/ 



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Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Prcssiiig a Specialty. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



jVIiiitafy Suits and Tpimmings. 



assachusetls Aaricultural Colleae, 




: 4i|, yfltiaM^aa^.ia^aaai&»jai&a 




AGG 




LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., MAY 17, 1893. 



No. 15 



NINETT-FODR WINS THE BANNER. — NINETY-FIVE NOT 

FAR BEHIND. FULL REPORT OF THE FIRST 

ANNUAL SPRING MEET OF THE 
M. A. C. A. A. 

The exercises of the first annual outdoor meet of 
the Mass. Agricultural College Athletic Association 
were held this morning and afternoon at Hampshire 
Park, Amherst, and the championship banner was 
awarded to the class of Ninety-four. Owing to the 
poor condition of the tracls after the heavy rains of 
last night, some of the records made were consider- 
ably below what should be expected. The neces- 
sary absence of some of the best men also, without 
a doubt, affected the results, but on the whole, 
Field Day is a success, and the members of the 
Association should receive the congratulations of 
the college. The attendance from the college was 
not as large as it should have been , but the barges that 
ran to and from the grounds, and the tally-ho 
coach, chartered by the class of Ninety-four, carried 
an assemblage that was enthusiastic to say the least. 
The number of points secured by each class in the 
indoor meet last winter was as follows : 

Ninety-three, 63, or 22.6%. 

Ninety-four, 107, or 38.3%. 

Ninety-five, 76, or 27.2%. 

Ninety-sis, 33, or 11.9%. 
The number of points and the percentages of 
to-day's meet are as follows : 

Ninety-four, 81, or 50%. 

Ninety-five, 63, or 39%. 

Ninety-three, 9, or 5.5%. 

Ninety-six, 9, or 5.5%. 
The average of the two meets gives Ninety-tour 
the first place, with 188 points and a percentage of 
44.1. The other classes stand as follows: Ninety- 



six, 42 points, or 8.7% ; Ninety-three, 72 points, 
or 14.1% ; Ninety-five, 139 points, or 33.1%. 

In the running hop, step and jump, S. P. Toole, 
'95, made a record of 39 ft. 6^ in. In the standing 
high jump, L. Manley, the winner, made a record of 
of 4 ft. 4 in. The second and third prizes were 
divided between J. E. Gifford, '94, and E. H. Hen- 
derson, '95. 8. P. Toole, '95, winner of the three 
standing jumps, made a record of 28 ft. 7 in. S. 
P. Toole, '95, winner of the running broad jump, 
made a record of 1 8 ft. The relay race proved to 
be of especial interest. 

EVENTS AND WINNERS. 

Forenoon, 9 o'clock. 

KONNING HOP, STEP AND JUMP. 

7 Entries. 

1st, S. P. Toole. '95, 38 ft. 7^ in. 
2d, A. J. Morse, '94, 35 ft. 6| in. 
3d, H. L. Frost, '95, 34 ft. 7^ in. 

POLE VAULT. 

7 Entries. 

1st, A. J. Morse, '94, 8 ft. 4 in. 

2d, L. Manley, '94, 8 ft. 6 in. 

3d, H. 8. Fairbanks, '95, 8 ft. 4 in. 

220-TARDS DASH. 

9 Entries. 

1st, S. P. Toole, '95, 24i see. 
2d, H. D. Hemenway, '95, 25 sec. 
3d, J. H. Putnam, '94, 25^ sec. 

PUTTING SHOT. 

8 Entries. 

1st, P. E. Davis, '94, 32 ft. 6 in. 
2d, H. C. Davis, '93, 30 ft. 2 in. 
3d, E. C. Howard, '93, 28 ft. 2 in. 



1 82 



FIELD DAY SUPPLEMENT. 



HURDLE RACE. (120 jds. 3^ ft. hurdles.) 




THROWING BASE-BALL. 


8 Entries. 




10 Entries. 


1st, A. J. Morse, '94, 21 sec. 




Ist, W. J. Curley, '96, 312 ft. 


2d, P. E. Davis, '94, 21| see. 




2d, S. F. Howard, '94, 296 ft. 


3d, L. Manley, '94, 21f sec. 




3d, A. H. Cutter, '94, 291 ft. 5 in. 


STANDING HIGH JDMP. 




RUNNING HIGH JDMP. 


9 Entries. 




5 Entries. 


1st, L. Manley, '94, 4 ft. 3 in. 




Ist, L. Manley, '94, 5 ft, 2 in. 


2d, J. E. Gifford, '94, 4 ft. 2 in. 




2d, P. E. Davis, '94, 4 ft. 8 in. 


2d, E. H. Henderson, '95, 4 ft. 2 in. 




3d, M. .J. Sullivan, '95, 4 ft. 6 in. 


MILE RUN. 




ONE-HALF MILE RUN. 


10 Entries. 




6 Entries. 


1st, H. J. Fowler, '94, 5 min. 23^ sec. 
2d, H. D. Hemenway, '95, 5 niin. 26 sec. 
3d, L. J. Shepard, '94. 




1st, H. D. Hemenway, '95, 2 min. 27f ^. 
2d, T. S. Bacon, '94, 2 min. 31 sec. 
3d, E. H. Clark, '95. 


THREE STANDING JUMPS. 




RUNNING BROAD JUMP. 


7 Entries. 




9 Entries. 


1st, S. P. Toole, '95, 28 ft. 2 in. 
2d, L. H. Bacon, '94, 27 ft. 3 in. 
3d, A. J. Morse, '94, 27 ft. 2^ in. 




1st, S. P. Toole, '95, 17 ft. 7 in. 
2d, H. C. Davis, '93, 17 ft. 
3d, J. Baker, '93, 16 ft. 11 in. 


RELAY RACE. (One mile.) 
4 Entries. 
1st, '94 First team, 4 min. 9| sec. 
2d, '95 First team, 4 min. 45| sec. 
3d, '94 Second team. 




ONE-HALF MILE WALK. 

6 Entries. 
1st, F. L. Warren, '95, 3 min. 56| sec. 
2d, H. L. Frost, '95, 4 min. 2| sec. 
3d, T. F. Keith, '94, 4 min. 3 sec. 


Afternoon, 2 o'clock. 




BICYCLE RACE. (Ouc mile.) 
4 Entries. 


STANDING BROAD JUMP. 




1st, L. Manley, '94, 3 min. 59f sec. 


8 Entries. 




2d, N. Shultis, '96, 4 min. 


1st, S. P. Toole, '95, 9 ft. 7 in. 




3d, H. W. Moore, '96. 


2d, L. H. Bacon, '94, 9 ft. | in. 
3d, H. C. Davis, '93, 8 ft. lOJ in. 

THROWING HAMMER. (16-lh.) 

4 Entries. 

1st, P. E. Davis, '94, 65 ft. 10 in. 
2d, S. P. Toole, '95, 59 ft. 10 in. 
3d, H. B. Read, '95, 58 ft. 6 in. 


FIELD OFFICERS. 

Prof. W. p. Brooks, Announcer. 

Lieut. W. M. Dickinson, Referee. 

Dr. J. B. Paige and C. S. Crocker, Judges. 

H. D. Haskins, Starter. 

J. E. Stinson and A. C. McCloud, Timers. 


100-YARDS DASH. 




OFFICERS ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 


8 Entries. 


H. 


C. Davis, President. 


1st, S. P. Toole, '95, lOf sec. 
2d, J. E. Gifford, '94, 11 sec. 


L. 
H. 


Manley, Sec'y and Treas. 

F. Staples, J. E. Gifford, E. 0. Bagg, H. C. 


3d, H. D. Hemenway, '95, 11| sec. 




Burrington, Directors. 



C. SV. ^-o^-yuuu^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



JIMHERST, MABB., MiLY 3i, iEHS. 



'^OL. in. • Mn. IE. 



»eRlMTERS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGR1CULTUR/\L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Frnits, addi-ess. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



THE MHERST 

FUpup >ND CARPET 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES ^ FILLOW S, STUDY 

DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUggES- 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS. RUGS, ETC., ETC. 

All Groods STK,ICTI»Y CASH and at 
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CASH DEALERS IN 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
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CASH ROW, 



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BOOTS AND SHOES 



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A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

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E,EFA.IK.IIsrC3- laoisrB mOlvIFTL-5^-. 



T. W. SLOAN, 

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10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam aod Hot Water Heatins; a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., MAY 31, 1893. 



No. 16 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Oifice as second-cla ss mail matter. 



BOAMD OF EDITORS : 

C.F. WALKER, '94, Eflitor-in-chief . 

G. H. MERWIN, '94, Business Manager. 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

P. L. GREENE, '94, T. P. FOLEY, '95, 

E. O. BAGG, '95, C. B. LANE, '95, 

R. L. HAYWARD, '96. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communica- 
tions should be addressed Aggie Lite, Amherst Mass. 



It is necessary that all outstanding subscriptions be 
paid at once. Subscribers finding this item marked please 
make payment to the Business Manager as soon as 
possible. 



f8<3^IS I 



The defacing of the papers and magazines in the 
reading room still continues. Would it not be a 
good idea to form a vigilance committee and ascer- 
tain who are the offenders? We feel sure that 
this outrage may be traced to one or two offenners. 
The students themselves can do more in the matter 
of bringing the guilty parties to justice than can the 
Association Directors. Let us unite in this matter 
and protect the rights of the owners. 



A NEW idea has occurred to the editorial mind, 
and it is this : Why should not the Durfee Plant 
House be opened to visitors Sunday afternoon? It 
is a public institution, belonging as it does to the 
state, and moreover it is a great source of attraction, 
as is shown by the large number who visit it every 
day. There would, of course, have to be some one 
in attendance, to look out for things ; but there are, 



doubtless, several of the students, anyone of whom 
would be glad to avail themselves of the chance. 
So far as has been observed, everyone seems to 
respect the place and everything about it, so that 
there need be no fear of vandalism. This is of 
course merely a suggestion, and there may be good 
reasons for not opening the Plant House on that 
day ; if so we would like to hear from those inter- 
ested. 



Those of the present junior class who may pause 
to consider the subject will recognize the fact that, 
in all departments of the College, growth has been 
onward and upward since their entrance. Especial- 
ly is this true of athletics. The fond hope of a field 
day so rudelv shattered two years ago, has at last 
been realized, and that too in a manner ex- 
ceeding the most sanguine anticipations. It was 
not to be expected that any world's records would 
be broken ; nor were they. But the number of 
entries' were large, the events were well contested 
and the results were satisfactory to all. Moreover, 
the custom was firmly established and it is hoped 
will continue as an integral part of our college life. 
To the officers of the athletic association is due 
much credit for the success of the event. 



The return to college of men who have left to go 
to some other institution or to take up the active 
duties of life is the best of evidence as to the stand- 
ing of the M. A. C. and the way it is regarded in 
other institutions. With two new courses of study, so 
much needed and so admirably adapted to the con- 
ditions of the young men of the state ; with the in- 
creasing importance of agriculture in all its brancues, 
with our new athletic field and '-Aggie" every year 
becoming more and more uoticed in athletic circles, 
with the spirit of progress which marks the institu- 
tion, there can be no reason why the M. A. C. should 
not become a great power in the state. Sooner or 



l82 



AGGIE LIFE. 



later it must become so ; it is only a questiou of 
time. And the sooner the youno; men of the state 
realize the benefits and importance of a course at 
the M. A. C. the sooner will they become the re- 
cipients of all the advantages accruing. 



It is a well known fact that the Stale has done, 
and is doing a great deril for its Agricultural college, 
but there is stiil room for improvement. The insti- 
tution being, as it is, under the patronage of the 
state, is looked to as a model, and is closely watched 
and criticised. For some peculiar reason there are 
many who, instead of trying to help it in anyway, 
seem to have some feeling against the College and 
wish it evil instead of good. We are glad to be 
able to say that this class ie small ; but that we are 
being sharply criticised is true, and it is for our 
interest to remove as far as possible all cause for 
the same. Let us beautify our grounds all we can. 
Let us have the best buildings for their kind that 
can be constructed. Let us have good roads, tools 
and teams. Then if we individually try to make 
ourselves a credit to the college, we shall make it 
the model that it is now supposed to be. But to do 
this we must have more money. The intentions 
and abilities of all in charge are above questiou ; 
but they can not do everything. We hope that we 
have not been too forward in this matter, for we 
have had at heart, only the highest good of the 
college. 



It is a well established custom for the reading 
room association to sell by auction the various news- 
papers and periodicals that are placed in the North 
College reading room. Publications that are thus 
sold become the property of the bidder after they 
have remained for a specified time in the reading 
room where they may be used by the whole college. 
Has it never occurred to the officers of the associa- 
tion that a much better way of disposing of the 
more valuable of the periodicals and weekly papers, 
would be to dontae them to the library ? This 
would probably necessitate increasing the associa- 
tion tax a slight amount, but the advantages gained 
would much more than compensate the cost. The 
fact that (iur library is lacking in reading matter 
outside the departments of science and history has 
ofte 1 been lamented. If files of such publication 



as Harper's Monthly, Harper's Weekly, Century, 
Scribners, Review of Reviews, etc., were kept on its 
shelves bound and ready for reference, would not 
the usefulness of the library be largely increased? 
The college will gladly pay for the binding of 
such publications, and will replace, wherever pos- 
sible, all previous numbers, so that complete files 
may be ready for use. We sincerely hope that 
next year this system of disposing of reading-room 
publications will be adopted. 



The number of absem.-es from military drill that 
have occurred during the last few weeks has been 
startling. After almost every drill, from twenty to 
twenty-five names have been posted on the bulletin 
board. While many of these may have been ex- 
cusable, that a large number of them were not is 
shown by the fact that last Saturday morning four- 
teen names were posted for extra drill. Such a 
state of affairs would seem to indicate that some- 
thing is wrong and that an immediate remedy is 
needed. The demerit system is supposed to make 
unexcusahle absences from drill exceedingly rare, 
but when students express their willingness to drill 
two hours on Saturday morning for the sake of 
obtaining a coveted hour in the afternoon, the value 
of this system oC punishment is lost. But not only 
are "cuts" from the regular drills of frequent occur- 
rence, but the the .Saturday morning exercise is 
often tieated in the same manner. Inasmuch as 
thiee weeks must elapse from the time the absences 
occur before thc^ last of the extra drills is held, the 
rapid approach of commencement time allows a 
student to "cut" drills with impunity. The military 
regulations are strict enough in many details of 
minor importance, but we think here is an oppor- 
tunity for a great improvement. The facts are 
these : according to the catalogue military drill is 
required of every student unless he is physically 
disqualified ; during the last few weeks the number 
of absences has been so great as to interfere to a 
serious degree with the work of the battalion. 
I'erhaps a large per cent, of these absences were 
necessary, but we doubt it. 



The University of Colorado has a professor for 
every four and a half students. Nothing small 
about that except the students. — College Life. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



183 



A S UNDA Y IN CHIC A GO. 

To those who have never visited this metropolis 
of the west, an account of the manner in which its 
inhabitants spend Sunday may i(e of interest. One 
who is acquainted with the manners and customs of 
New England life, finds that a Sabbath in Chicago 
dunng the great Exposition is full of surprises. 

Let us take a stroll up Stony Island avenue and 
notice the way the day is kept here. We find our- 
selves in the midst of a great throng. Hundreds 
of workmen may be seen hurrying toward the Fair 
grounds, just as they would were it any other day 
of the week. Restaurants, beer saloons and grocery 
stores are nearly all open and doing a fair amount 
of business. Electric cars run as usual. Reaching 
one of the entrances to the Exposition grounds we 
find the street full of people who have come to the 
fair hoping to gain admittance, but the order to 
close the gates is carried out to the letter, and no 
person who has not urgent business within the 
enclosure, is allowed to enter. 

The thousands who are turned away du not re- 
turn to the city at once, but determine to see what 
they can and to enjoy themselves as nuich as pos- 
sible, so they turn their attention to the side-shows, 
fortune telling establishments and numerous other 
nttractioDS. For a mile along the west side of 
Stony Island avenue these places are as numerous 
as are complaints against Sunday closing. All day 
long the street presents an animated appearance. 
The shrill voices of fakirs and pop-corn venders 
and the music of bands combine to add to the ex- 
citement. It is a regular holiday the whole length 
of the avenue and in i!s immediate vicinity ; the day 
bears no resemblance to a Sabbath in a New Eng- 
land city ; it is a Sunday in name only. Such a 
condition of things almost convinces one that the 
Fair ought to open its gates seven days in the 
week. 

We will now board a car on the elevated road and 
go up into the iieart of the city, a distance of six or 
seven miles, to Mr. Moody's church, which we find 
crowded to its utmost capacity. Mr. Sankey pre- 
sides at the organ, and after an opening selection 
by the choir, solos are rende'red by Mr. Sankey and 
Mr. Towner. At this particular meeting Mr. Moody 
selects the lesson of the Prodigal son, and says that 
it is a fact to be regretted that the elder brother in 



the parable is well known in Chicago. 

Mr. Moody will be assisted in his series of meet- 
ings in Chicago by Mr. Spurgeon of England. 

At 4-.30 p. M. begins our Y. M. C. A. meeting at 
Byngo Hall. This association is made up of about 
500 men representing nearly every state. Quite a 
number of them are students in theological schools 
and seminaries. Our president is from Boston 
University. A member is selected to lead the 
meeting, another to lead the singing while a young 
lady from a neighboring church plays the organ. 
You can readily imagine what glorious meetings we 
have. Many attend the evening services in the 
various churches, and our young ministers are 
occasionally called upon to lead. Thus Sunday in 
Chicago comes to a close. 

c. B. L. 



LIBRARY NOTES. 

Of the recent additions to the library. Football, 
The Rugby Union Game is one that will be of inter. 
est to ever3- devotee of that sport. It is an English 
book edited by Rev. F. Marshall. Among the 
writers are such men as G. Rowland Hill and H. 
Vassall whose names are honored by all lovers of 
football. 

In the first chapter, the origin of the game is dis- 
cussed. It is seen to be a lineal descendant of the 
old Roman game of /iarpasiwrn, which in many points 
resembles the modern game, especially as played by 
the Rugby Union. 

The modern game is largely an outgrowth of the 
game as played in the great English schools of Rug- 
by, Eton, Harrow, etc., hence a chapter is devoted 
to the peculiar features of the play at each of the 
five leading schools. Subsequent chapters describe 
the development of the game in Scotland, Wales, 
and the colonies. The bulk of the book is given, 
however, to the consideration of the clubs and play- 
ers of London and the Counties. The history of 
the rise of the Rugby Union in opposition to the 
Association is given in full. No mention is made 
of American football. 

The Handbook of Athletic Sports, Vol. IV, will 
appeal to a larger class of .readers. This volume 
deals with football as played by both the Union and 
Association, baseball, rounders, bowls, quoits and 
curling. Under each game is given a short history 



i84 



AGGIE LIFE. 



of its progress, the qualities demanded for success- 
fully playing the different positions, an account of 
the principal plays and an appendix containing a 
full set of the rules governing the games. Probably 
the most interesting section to us is the one on base- 
ball. This is here claimed to be a modification of 
the old English game of roundeis although Mr. A. 
G. Spaulding of Chicago ascribes its origin to the 
old French game of tcheque introduced into America 
by the Huguenots. As the American national game, 
baseball at first gained but few friends in England, 
but from its intrinsic value iu furnishing active, 
heallliful recreation available, in spite of their scant 
leisure, to even the working class, it is steadily grow- 
ing in favor among the sport-loving Britons, and it 
bids fair to become in time almost as popular there 
as here. The game of rounders corresponds iumany 
respects to that here known as round ball. The 
.Scotch games of bowls and curling are similar in 
principle to the tiame of quoits. 

If a good title is an advantage to a book then 
surely Mr. B. R. Tucker, the author of Instead of a 
Book, By a Man Too Busy to Write One launched 
his on its career under auspicious omens. Nor is its 
title misleading although at first sight the produc- 
tion would seem to have all the qualities of a book. 
The distinction lies in the fact that a book is a con- 
nected whole, while this is made up of extracts 
from a paper edited and published by Mr. Tucker. 
This paper is the organ of the Anarchist party and 
is published, not in Chicago, as one might expect, 
but in staid Boston. The paper is eutiiled Liberty; 
and if we may judge from the extracts given in the 
work we are discussing, it is devoted to the highest 
ideal of individual liberty. Some portions of the 
reasoning seem to us illogical and far-fetched ; 
nevertheless one who gives the work a careful peru- 
sal will probably feel repaid for the time even if 
some of his preconceived ideas of rights are rudely 
shaken. 

Best of all is the latest addition to the library. 
Although a strictly scientific work it yet possesses 
great interest for the unscientific reader both from 
the fascination of the subject and the clear and 
graceful style. The title is The Great Barrier Reef 
of Australia. Its Products and Potentialities by W. 
Saville-Kent, F. L. S., F. Z. S., etc. The large 
quarto volume is an almost perfect specimen of the 



printer's art. It is richly illustrated with forty- 
eight photo-mezzotype plates and sixteen chromo 
plates representing: the rare and l)eautiful forms of 
animal life that inhabit the reel. This reef is of 
coral formation and over 1200 miles long. It is, 
more correctly, a series of reefs and islands lying 
off the coast of Queensland from ten to sixty miles 
distant. It possesses great interest to the zoologist 
on account of the many varieties of corals which 
may there be studied. Our author found seventy 
species of, the one genus Madrepora in this reef. 
The pearl, trepang, oyster, and other fishing indus- 
tries, as well as the mariue fauna are fully described 
and iUustiated. An interesting chapter is that on 
the potentialities of the region. Already the revenue 
derived from the reef is about $500,000 per annum 
and when its rrsources are fully developed it will be 
a most valuable possession. The book will well 
repay m'>sL careful study by both the specialist and 
oeneral reader. 



FIELD 


DAT SUMMARY. 






The following summary of the 


points 


won 


by 


the 


citnlcstanls at the F 


ield Day exercises, 


May 


17 


, is 


given for reference 












Bacon, T. S., 


lat. 




2d. 

1 


3d. 



Total No. 
of Points. 

a 


Bacon, L. H., 





2 







6 


Baker, J., 












1 


Clark, E. H., 












1 


Curley, W. J., 
Cutter, 


1 












5 
1 


Davis, P. E., 


2 


2 






16 


Davis, H. C, 





2 






7 


Fairbanlis, 












1 


Fowler, H. J., 


1 









5 


Frost, 





1 






4 


Gilford, 





2 






6 


Hemeiiway, 
Henderson, E. H., 


1 




2 







12 


Howard, E. C, 














Howard, S. F., 





1 








Keith, 














Manley, 
Moore, 


2 



1 








14 


Morse, A. .J., 


2 


1 






14 


Pntnam, 














Read, H. B., 














Shepard, 
Shultis, 








1 







3 


Sullivan, 








1 




1 


Toole, 


6 


1 







33 



AGGIE LIFE- 



185 



f^f^s i-^rris. 



THE PEART EXPEDITION. 

The second arctic fspeditiou, for esploratiLiii and 
scientific observation, under the command of Lieut. 
R. E. Peary, U. S. N., will sail from New York the 
last of June on the sealer Falcon, a vessel especially 
equipped for the purpose. The route will be through 
Davis Strait and across Baffin Bay to a point on the 
west coast of Greenland, 77" 35' north latitude. 
Here on the shores of an inlet, the portable build- 
ings brought on the vessel will be set up by the 
crew, provisions sufficient to last the party three 
years will be unloaded, scientific instruments will be 
placed in position, books, papers, charts and other 
paraphernalia will be unpacked, and then, when 
everything possible has been done to contribute to 
the comfort and to secure the safety of the party, 
the ship will sail away leaving them to pursue their 
studies and iuvesligatious as best they may. 

Although exploration is perhaps the chief object 
of the expedition, other departments of science will 
not be overlooked. The party consists of ten men, 
each of whom will be in charge of i-ome particular 
line of work. In this manner, a great deal of val- 
uable data will be secured. Of es|)eeial itnporUince 
will be the observations taken on the aurora. As 
has been mentioned in jinother column, the meteor- 
ological department will probably lie under the 
charge of Prof. C. U. Warner of this college. He 
will have one assistant to aid him in his observa. 
tions and calculations. 

If Lieutenant Peary succeeds in adding material- 
ly to the scientific knowledge of the world, without 
enduring the terrible suffering or bringing about the 
loss of life that has heretofore formed a part of the 
experiences of arctic explorers, he will merit a just 
reward. 



HIS LETTER. 
"Dear Father: 

Please excuse," he wrote, 
"The hurried shortuess of this note ; 
But studies so demand attention. 
That I have barely time to mention 
That I am well, and add that I 
Lack funds ; please send me some. Goodbye. 
Your loving son." 

He signed his name 
And hastened to— the foot-ball game. 



-Ex. 



THE VISIT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COM- 
MITTEES. 

On Thursday, May 18th, the committees of Agri- 
culture, Finance, Military and Education visited the 
College and inspected the various departments. 
There were about forty in the parly, being nearly a 
full representation of each committee and also 
representing both the Senate and the House. The 
party reached Amherst at 11.16, and proceeded to 
the Amherst House where dinner was served. The 
in.'-pection began on the east side at the insectory, 
taking in successively the Durfee Plant House, 
Botanic Museum and the State Experiment Station. 

The College campus was the next objective poiut 
where the Battalion was drilled before the whole 
party and inspected by the committee on Military. 

In the evening they attended a reception at the 
house of Pres. Goodell to which members of the 
Faculty and the alumni at the different Stations with 
friends were also invited. 

On Friday morning they attended chapel, after 
which the inspection was continued. The Meteoro- 
logical Observatory, the Museum and the Chemical 
Laboratory successively received the attention of 
the Honorable gentlemen. They visited the Farm 
Barn, drove to the site of the new buildings and fin- 
ished the inspection at the Hatch Barn. 

The Committees could not but have been impressed 
by the excellent condition of many of the depart- 
ments. No one who thoroughly investigates the 
workings of the College can deny that a great work 
is being done for the young men of the State, a 
work which should receive the attention and support 
of the parties to whose hands is instrusted the 
power of disposing of the public funds. 



r. M. C. A. TOPICS. 



June 1. — What must I do to be Saved? Acts 16 : 
•29-24. T. S. Bacon. 

June 4.— Come unto Me. Matt. 11 :28-30. L. W. 
Smith. 

June 8.— Studv the Bible. Matt. 22 : 29 ; II Tim. 
2 :i5. S. Knroda. 

June 11. — Consistent Christianity. Luke 10 : SO- 
BS. G. E. Smith. 

June 15. — Christ the Wav, the Truth and the Life. 
John 14:1-6." J. E. Green. 



i86 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^ollc^f ^otfs. 



PROGRAM. 

TWENTY-THIRD COMMENCEMENT. 

Sunday, June 18. — Bacealauroate sermon by Rev. 
Charles (S. Walker, Ph. D., Professor of 
Mental Science. 10 45 a. m. 
Address before the College Young Men's 
Christian Association by Rev. A.E.Dmining, 
D. D., Editor of the Gongregationalist. 8 p. m. 

Monday, June 19 — Address to the Senior class by 
the President. 8.30 a. m. 
Flint Prize Speaking, Junior class, 3.30 p. m. 
Prize Speaking, Freshman and Sophomore 
classes, 8 p. m. 

Tuesday, June 20. — Annual Meeting of Trustees, 
at the office of the Hatch P^xperiment Station, 
9.30 A m. 

Public exercises commemorative of the 
Twentieth Anniversary of the Founding of 
the Phi Sigma Kappa P'raternity, 10 a. m. 
Orator, Rev. Henry Hague of So. Worcester. 
Addresses of Comity by representative mem- 
bers of other fraternities. 
Meeting of Committee on Experiment De- 
partment, at the office of the Hatch Experi- 
ment Station, 11.30 a. m. 
Alumni dinner, 1 p. m. 
Class Day Exercises, 2.00 p. m. 
Battalion Parade, Battalion Drill, Sabre Drill, 
4.30 p. m., followed by reading of military 
essays and presenting of military diplomas. 
Reception by the President and Trustees, in 
the Stone Chapel, 8 to 10 p. m. 

Wednesday, June 21. — Graduating Exercises, 

10 A. M. 

Thursday, June 22. — Examination of Candidates 
for admission, at the Botanic Museum, 9 

A. M. 



— Memorial Day — May 30. 

—The score : M. A. C. 11, Trinity 6. 

— Orators, oratory and Commencement ! 

— R. S. Jones, '95, was absent last week. 

— Mason, '95, has left college for a short time. 

— Harper, '96, has been home the last few weeks. 



— H. F. Staples, '93, has gone home for a few 
days. 

— The Commencement programs are being 
printed. 

— The last Junior exercise in oratory was held 
May 26. 

— D. C. Potter. '95, spent a few days at home 
last week. 

— M. A. C. vs. Williston at Easthampton this 
afternoon. 

— H. T. Fldwards, '96, is visiting his brother at 
West Point. 

— E. H. Henderson, '95, is spending a few days 
at his home. 

— Boston University Commencement exercises 
occur June 7. 

— Col. Hughes is liable to put in an appearance 
at any moment. 

— The music at parade last Thursday was worthy 
of commendation. 

--May 19. The "Professor" and the Phrenologist. 
A farce in one act. 

— The band has been laboring under difficulties 
the last two week.s. 

— A. .J. Morse. '94, has been spending the last 
two weeks at home. 

— A. Davis, ex-'95, has returned to college and 
will enter Ninety-six. 

— The Junior class will soon commence labora- 
tory work in entomology. 

— J. E. Gifford has been elected pipe custodian 
of the class'of Ninety-four. 

— A photograph of last year's Life board has 
been placed in the library. 

— R. W. Drury, '95, last week took the West 
Point entrance examinations. 

— 1<. A. Smith, '93, has been spending a short 
vacation at his home in Lynn. 

— The Seniors meet in the old chapel room every 
week for instruction in dancing. 

— Mr. Hiram Harlow of West Boylston, Mass., 
visited H. J. Harlow, '93, Sunday. 

— The senior class have petitioned the faculty to 
grunt the usual senior vacation the last week before 
commencement. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



187 



— A new transit has been purchased by the math- 
ematical depsirtment, and is now in use. 

— Day, '96, has finished his engagement with the 
measles and is once more about college. 

— Extra copies of the Field Day Supplement 
may be obtained of the Business Manager. 

— A framed photogi'aph of the last Life board 
has been presented to the library by the paper. 

— The game scheduled to bt played with Williston 
Seminary at Easthamptmi, May 20, was postponed. 

— W. L. Hemis, '95, a delegate to the Q. T. V. 
Convention at Boston is spending a few days at 
home. 

— Lieut. Dickinson has been unable to perform 
his duties at the college the last week by reason of 
sickness. 

— The construction of the cold grapery at the 
Plant House has been conimonced and will soon be 
comjileted. 

— L. J. Shepard, '94, has accepted a position as 
asMstaut at the Worcester County Truant School, 
Oakdale, Mass. 

— The Cycle ami Supplement publisheil by the D. 
G. K. fraternity will lie issued as usual the coming 
commeneeuii-nt. 

— Mr. A. B. Graves, formerly florist at the In- 
sane Asylum at Northampton is now in charge of the 
Durfee Plant House. 

— At the last meeting of tlie New England Inter- 
collegiate Press Association, Aggie Life was ad- 
mitted 1<) membership. 

— The Grinnell Examination in Agriculture, usu- 
ally included in the commencement exercises will be 
held Saturday, June 17, 

— Prof. Fernald was absent from college a por- 
tion of last week, attending to his duties in connec- 
tion with the Gypsy Moth. 

—Sanderson, '94, left on Friday for Boston, 
where he has obtained a position as clerk. He will 
return to college in the fall. 

— A photograph of last fall's foot-ball team ac- 
companied by a handsome frame, has been donated 
to the library by J. R. Perry, '93. 

— The Dictionary of Thought has been placed on 
the shelves of the chapel reading room. Literary 
students will find it a valuable aid. 



— The Junior class was examined in ornamental 
gardening Tuesday and Thursday of last week. They 
have now taken up the study of forestry. 

— T. S. Bacon, '94, represented Aggie Life at 
the annual banquet of the New England Intercolle- 
giate Press Association, held at Worcester, May 
24. 

— The class of Eighty-two has placed a metal plate 
upon its class tree at the entrance of the college 
grounds. We understand this custom is to be fol- 
lowed by other classes. 

— An interesting letter from Mr. J. C. Dillon, 
formerly superintendent of the college farm, recent- 
ly appeared in the Amherst Record. Mr. Dillon is 
at Chicago attending to a portion of the state exhibit. 

— rhe military essays of the senior class are now 
in the hands of Lieut. H. L. Hawthorn, U. S. A., 
of the Boston Institute of Technology, who with 
Lieut Dickinson will award the prize of fifteen 
dollars. 

— Wi rk on the pond progresses but slowly. Work- 
men ha\e been busy the past week removing the 
surface soil from the southern portion of the area 
to bt- overflowed, and carting it to the P. S. K. lot 
opposite the Bangs place. 

— Prof. C. D. Warner has accepted the invitation 
to accompany Lieut. Peary on his second Arctic ex- 
pedition. He will be meteorologist to the party and 
will be second in command. We wish the professor 
success in his new undertaking. 

— The following revised schedule of games has 
been published by the Baseball Manager : 
May 31, Williston at Easthampton. 
June 3, Worcescer Tech. at Worcester. 
June 10, Williston at Amherst. 

— -The next number of Aggie Life will be issued 
Tuesdaj' afternoon of commencement week. It will 
contain four extra pages, and will be devoted entire- 
ly to college news, including a full report of com- 
mencement exercises, awarding of prizes, etc. 

— The century plant has suddenly made up its 
mind to grow sideways as well as perpendicularly ; 
nevertheless it is rapidly taking up the space allotted 
to it, the stalk now being about 14 ft. high. Prof. 
Maynard estimates that it will bear about 1500 
flowers. 



i88 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— The prelimiDary circular of information cod- 
'cerning the World's Student's Conference, to be 
held at Northfield, July 1-12, 1893, has beerj issued. 
Among the speakers will be Prof. Henry Drummond 
of Glasgow, Scotland, and Congressman W. C. 
Breckenridge, the Kentucky orator. 

— The next entertainment of the Union lecture 
-course will be held in the Town Hail, .Tune 7, when 
Lieut Wadhams, U. S. N., will speak on "Our New 
Navy." June 14, a concert will be given at which 
a program will be rendered by local talent assisted 
by Fraulein Von Mitzlaff of Smith College. 

— E. O. Bagg, '95. who is suffering from injuries 
received at the Trinity game at Hartford, May 13, 
is slowly recovering, although for a time he was in 
a critical condition. His absence is severely felt as 
lie was especially prominent in athletic circles. He 
•is also leading tenor in the Glee Club, a member of 
the college band, and one of the editors of the Life. 

— There are 128 students now enrolled as members 
of the college : 21 seniors, 34 juniors, 34 sopho- 
mores and 39 freshmen. Of this total, 11 are now 
absent having been excused from attendance during 
the present term. Of the whole number of students 5 
iiave permanent excuses from military drill. The 
battalion now consists of 112 cadets, as follows: 
ofBcers,17 ; non-commissioned officers, 29 ; privates, 
66. 

— May 22, the Fire Brigade — or a portion of it — 
was photogvapherl by Lovell for the benefit of sight- 
seers at the World's Fair. The hose was laid to 
the northwest corner of the drill-hall, where an ar- 
rangement of ladders and buckets gave a touch of 
ireality to the scene. The heroic fire-fighters, perched 
on the roof, enjoyed the adventure immensely and 
returned to terra-firma but slightly the worse for red 
paint and Pelham water. 

— During the last week a large number of work- 
men have been engaged in remodeling the grounds 
adjacent to the plant house extension. A new drive- 
way has been laid out and a large amount of turfiiig 
and terrace work has been accomplished. The rose- 
houac has at last been fitted with benches and a 
large number of plants have been secured, which 
will be in blossom by commencement time. The 
out-door beds are receiving needed attention and 
will soon add to the attractiveness o( tlie grounds. 



— The 'gator that for several years has lived a 
quiet life in the tank room of the Durfee Plant House 
has disappeared from his accustomed retreat among 
the aquatic plants. The amphibian was brought 
from Florida by Mr. Joseph Gilbert. At first it 
seemed quite satisfied vvith the change of climate, 
but a diet of Pelham water and soda crackers was 
too much for it — and it pined away. 



THE THORN THAT GUARDS. 

Far in the corner on the stairs, 
We were sitting together, she and I, 

The murmuring music was soft and low, 
Like zephyrs that float 'neath a summer sky. 

She held in her fingers a deep red rose, 
And was plucking the petals one by one, 

Her eyes were filled with the dreamy light 
That softens the west when the day is done. 

"Ah, Nelly, you are a bud itself, 

Its blushing sweetness all is thine. 
Cannot you let me press the flower, 

And keep it forever and call it mine?" 

The fair lips trembled, the dimples smiled, 
Her eyes told clearly that I had lost, 

But my heart still hoped, till she gently sighed, 
"You forget that American Beauties cost." 

— Yale Courant. 



GLASS DAY EXERCISES. 

NINETY-THREE. 

Tuesday, June 20th, at 2.00 p. m. 
Music, M. A. C. Band 

Planting of Class Ivv, Pres. C. A. Goodrich 



Prayer, 
Ivy Poem, 

Music, 

Class Oration, 

Campus Oration, 



Ivy Song. 



Class Song. 



Campus Poem, 

Pipe Oration, 

Music, 

Grove Oration, 

Presentation of Gifts, 

Parting Song. 
Music, 



Dr. C. S. Walker 
C. A. Smith' 

M. A. C.Band 

F. H. Henderson 

C. A Goodrich 

E. C. Howard 

F. S. Hoyt 

M. A. C. Band 

H. F. Staples 
A. E. Melendy 

M. A. C. Baud 



A fine article on "College Athletics" by Walter 
Camp appears in the Century Magazine for June. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



189 



BASEBALL. 
M. A. C, 11; Trinity, 6. 
Aggie crossed bats with Trinity on tlie campus, 
May 27th, for the second time this year and once 
more obtained a victory, the score being 11-6. 
Trinity lost the game throuoh the wildness of Bowie 
and the inability of Peck to hold him. G. Chirley 
pitched good ball and was equally well siijjported by 
W. Ciirley. not a battery error being made. Trinity 
with the exception of the battery work put up a tine 
game. Gage and Dingwall playing first-class ball. 
Aggie put up her poorest game of the season, being 
unable to toucli up Bowie for more than three hits, 
and in addition the inexcusabk' errors and poor base 
running were too iHomineut features of the game. 
Howard, Jones and the Curley brothers played the 
best ball for the home teain. The score : 



F. Read, ss, 
W. Curley, c, 
Sullivan, rf, 

G. Curley, p, 
Clark, 2b, 
Learay, 3b, 
H. Bead, lb, 
Howard, cf, 
Jones, If, 

Total, 

BrouglitOD, ss, 
Dingwall, 2b, 
Bowie, p, 
Young, cf , 
Cullen, If, 
WoflFenden, rf , 
Hartley, lb, 
Peck, c, 
Gage, 3b, 

Total, 



M. A. c. 

AB R IBTESHPO A E 
4200004 2 
4 2 7 10 
o 1 

3 1 1 1 10 
22000333 

4 3 1 
4 12 
4 1110 3 
2 3 110 1 



30 11 
TKINITY. 



3 



18 



6 



5 10 2 2 1 

5 12 2 2 2 1 

5 2 3 5 10 9 2 

5 111110 
50220000 

5 12 2 

5 10 

400007 5 

4 2 2 1 



43 



10 12 



24 20 



Innings, 123456789 

M. A. C, 110 2 2 3 2 —11 

Trinitv , 10030010 1— g 

Times at batr— Aggie 30, Trinity 43. Earned runs— Aggie 1, 
Trinity, 3. Total bases on hits— Aggie 3, Trinity 12. Sacrifice hits 
— Leamy 3, Bowie, Young. Stolen bases— Jones 2, Howard, Clark, 
W. Curley, Dingwall 2, Woffenclen 2, Hartley 2, Young. Three base 
hits— Bowie. First base on balls— Clark 2, Jones 2, G. Curley, F 
Read, Sullivan. First base on errors — Aggie 5, Trinity 5. Lett on 
bases— Aggie 2, Trinity 8. Struck out— H. Read 3, Sullivan 2, Clark 
F. Read, W. Curley, Jones, Peck 4, Woffenden 3, Gage. Passed' 
balls— Peck 5. Wild pitches— Bowie 2. Time— 2 hours. Umpire— 
Lehnert. Scorer— T. F. Keith. 



A stock company has been formed at the Univ. 
of Michigan, for the purpose of publishing an illus- 
trated bi-weekly. The paper will be started ne.st 
fall. 



'74. — D. G. Hitchcock, High St., Warren, Mass. 
of the Warren Herald has enlarged and greatly im- 
proved the paper since he became editor and pro- 
[irietor a short time ago. 

'75. — Rev. H. Hague, South Worcester, will de_ 
liver the address at the public exercises of the 
Alpha Chapter, Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity, to be 
held Tuesday, June 20th. 

'81.— W. F. Carr, Superintendent of City Rail- 
roads, Minneapolis, Minn., has invented an electric 
appliance for tunneling" and has refused an oflFer of 
$100,000 for half interest in the patent. 

'86. C. W. Clapp of Montague visited the 
College, May 24th. 

'SS.— 8. H. Field of Hatfield was at the College 
the 18th ult. 

'90. --F. J. Smith, assistant at the M. A. C. 
Laboratory, left for Chicago, May 28, where he is 
to remain one month as a Demonstrator in the 
Chemical Department of the Exposition. 

'91. — C. A. Magill was at the college May 27. 

'91. — E. P. Felt, of Cornell University, is the 
author of a monograph on the Nomophila Noctuella 
published in the Canadian Entomologist. 

'92. — A. T. Beals of Greenfield, spent Sunday, 
May 21st, at the College. 

'92. ^G. E. Taylor of Shelburue has been visit- 
ing friends in town recently. 

'92. — F. 6 Stockbridge has resigned his position 
as Secretary of the Lehigh Coal Mining Co., North 
Dakota, and is at present with the Dakota Land & 
Colonizing Co., Dickinson, No. Dakota. 



A GIFT FOR CHICAGO UNIVERSITY. 
John D. Rocekfeller has given $150,000 to the 
University of Chicago in order that Martin A. Ryer- 
son's gift of $100,000, conditional on the raising of 
$400,000 more, might become available. About 
$100,000 has been raised already, so that there re- 
mains but $150,000 to complete the half million 
dollars needed as an equipment tund. The money 
must be secured by July l,or the Ryerson and Rocke- 
feller gifts will be lost to the University — Brown 
Daily Herald. 



I go 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Q. T. V. FRATERNITY ANNUAL CONVEN- 
TION. 

The Annual Convention of the Q. T. V. Frater- 
nity was held at the United States Hotel, Boston, 
Mass., May 18th and 19th, undev the auspices of 
the Boston Alumni Chapter. Thursday, fraternity 
business was attended to, and Friday at the conclu- 
sion of the evening's exercises, a banquet was held 
in the spacious parlors of the hotel. Prof. F. H. 
Osgood, of Harvard University, acted as tonst- 
master, and the fraternity poem was written by T. 
F. Keith, '94, of Amherst Chapter. L. H. Bacon 
'94, A. E. Melendy, '93 and W. L. Bemis, '95 were 
delegates from the Amherst chapter. 

The convention was a success in every particular, 
thanks to the Boston Alumni. The place of the 
next year's meeting was left undecided, it resting 
between Orono and Amherst. It is likely, however, 
that the latter will obtain the privilege, as the twen- 
ty-fifth anniversary of the chapter established at this 
college occurs in '94, and plans were discussed for 
its proper observance. 



MY VEGETARIAN GIEL. 

I've hean thinking of you, darling, and your father's stern 

decree ; 
Watermelon cholly future seems to be in store for me, 
Lettuce leave your cruel parents, from whose word there's 

no a peel, 
By-and-by we may a peas them, after time their wounds 

shall heal. 
You cantelope ! 'What nonsense, darling, name a date 

when we may go, 
Oh thou "apple of mine eye," thou cores of all my awful 

woe. 
But a thought most gloomy strikes me, and a radish tint 
appears 
On my cheek, while fierce within me beets my heart with 

sickening fears, 
If I've bean the huckleberry, and you love my rival more, 
I will cabbage some rat-poison — strike out for the golden 

shore ; 
Then you'll fig me on the ice-cream, that your foolishness 

has cost ; 
Then you'll not turnip your nostrils at the youth whom 

you have lost. 

— The Polytechnic. 



A German philosopher proposes to live upou elec- 
tricity and thus do away with the tedious process of 
eating. His menu would probably be something 
like this : greased lightning for breakfast, thunder 
bolts for dinner, and shocks and currents for sup- 
per. — Ex. 

The Intercollegiate Athletic Association, known 
as the "Mott Haven Association," consists at pres- 
ent of the following members : Yale, Princeton, 
Cornell, Trinity, Columbia, Rutgers, Stevens, 
Georgetown, Williams, Amherst. Univ. of Pennsyl- 
vania, Harvaid, College of City of New York, Univ. 
of City of New York, Fordham, Dartmouth, Union, 
Brown, Wesleyan and Swarthmore. — Bates Student. 

BEFORE EXAMS. 

Backward, turn backward, Time in thy flight. 
Make me a "kid" again just for to-night. 
Give me my kite, my bat and my ball. 
Tattered brimmed hat, knee breeches and all; 
Give me a chance to relieve my poor brain. 
Or this endless plugging, 'twill make me insane. 

—Ex. 

The University of Michigan Daily will issue an 
alumni weekly after this year. 



liiare s 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SGHILLARE, 



108 MAIN STREET, - NOBTHAMPTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



191 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 



leaips 



"Lamps Mi L8!iip Goods are Oyrs." 



imm. 



WIIjZIAMS' BLOCE, AaiBERST, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 



LIYERY. FEED 



^ 



T. L PAIGE, Prop'R 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMUEBST, MASS. 



DEALER IN 



K.A 



FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 



REPAIRING S^EATLY A'la ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



H. 0. PE 



h 






_A.I-mES,ST, 



IVflT-A-SS. 



H. D. HEMENWAY, 



DEALER IN 



Si 



FOUNTAIN PENS, NOTE BOOKS, WHITE GLOVES, 

POCKET LENSES, STATIONERY, BOTANY 

PRESSES, CONFECTIONERY, 

ETC. 

-^s^PRICES LOV^. 

Sf NORTH COLLEGE. 




A High Grade 
Wheel for a lit- 
tle money. 

Solid Tire, $85. 
CusliionTire,$90, 
Poeumatic 

^ _ ^ I Til's! $115" 

'■i*ri%f^^^f^;:-~-iP" " ^4^s^^^^^JI Send for Catalogue. 

I-Ol S \LE Bl 

box: 386, - - .A-IVLKERST, 1S/LA.SS- 

flg-All correspondence will receive prompt attention.=ffia 



STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 



NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 

FIS.<ST CLASS GOODS. PMICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH college:. 



.AMHERST COLLEGE 

ratiie Steai LaiiMrj^^ 

and Carpet Reiiovatii Establislimeiit. 

Aggie Agent C. L. BROWN, '94. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

^SA.TISFA.CTIOIsr C3-XJ.A.H..A-l>TTBBr),a/S^ 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



ig2 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LABGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes I Rubbers 

in town at 
■\;viliXjIa.]vcs' block;. 



Sheet ^Miasic, 



Miasic Books, 



Strings 

FOR the: violin, banjo, guitar, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies ahvays 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEU F 

AMHERST, MASS. 



,.«DENTI8TS. 5),. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. 8. 
T. G. HUN^TINGTON, D. D. S. 

CVTLER'S BLOCK, AMMEJtST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS : 
e A.. ]VE. TO S F. 3VC. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PBTSICIANS' PRBSCB.Il'TIOtfS CAMMFimT 
COMPOUNDED, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your O&MiSa here. 

WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODGETT & CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



For Ouits B.nd Fa,ll OvBrcaats 

CALL AT OUK STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



FINE ITAL m FAIENCE LAiPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, §3.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, .$2.00, §2.50 AND §3.00. 

For Pine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

0» G= COUCM & SOM'S. 
FRANK O. PLL^MB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHESST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseau, 

RAZORS HONED. 
Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cooh's Rloch, Atnherat, Mass, 



-L-L ^<J 



H 



gfiPDIEg 



FRESH KEH fine. 



DEUEL'S DR 

Amtierst House Block, 



1 
J 




RE, 

Amtierst, Mass. 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Riles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 

THE 


PIiaTOERJEFHER. 


NEW SKY LIGHT. 
EINLARGEID OPEZRA-TING ROOM. 


CLASS AND 


SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY. 



OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



EJ. g. Dl(?Hl(^gO[M, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 
WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-80 to 5 p. M. 



^"■Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T THE 



AMHERST GASH SHOE STOREi 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHEEST, MASS. 



A. (jlv 



/' 



\. 



T A I LP R. »^ 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning aiid Finessing a Specialty. 



SV/EATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



IWilitapy Salts and Trimmings. 



assachusetis Aaricullural Colleae, 




C. y. V'c-i-.o.^ 



Coiniucncement IRumber. 



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iLMHERST, MABB., JUNE 2D, 1693. 



YQL. III. Nn. 12. 






AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND OKNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 



Prof, S. T. Maynard, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



THE AMERST 




m CARPET 



sto:r.s. 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 
BEDSTE A DS. MATTRESSES. PILLOW S, STUDY 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIE S, 

CARPETS. RUGS, ETC., ETC. 

All Goods STS,ICTI.T CASH and at 
LOWEST 2>E,ICJES. 



C, H. SANDERSOH^&, CO., 



CASH DEALERS IN 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods, 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEI|SOfi k THOMPSOI^, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS, 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVKRTBODT. 



A FINE LINE OP STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

- IKXJBBSSSB a-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



HEF^VIE-IISTO UOITE: FR,OIW[^>TL~5r. 



T, VV. SLOAN, 

3 fBOSWIX ROW. 



10 PHa<:Nix ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



S. A. PHILLIPS, 

'raetkal Rtaniber, 

STE/^.Vi AND GAS riJIER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Stesun and Hot Water Mealitia; a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. III. 



AMHERST, MASS., JUNE 20, 1893. 



No. 17 





AGGIE 


LIFE. 






Published 


Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 


Terms $1,00 


per year, in advance. 


Single copies, 


10c. 


Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS : 

C. F. WALKER, '94, Editorin.chief . 

G. H. MEEWIN, '94, Business Manager. 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

F. L. GREENE, '94, T. P. FOLEY, '95, 

E. O. BAGG, '95, G. B. LANE, '95, 

E. L. HATWARD, '96. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communica- 
tions should be addressed Aggie Lite, Amhekst Mass. 



riaSs. 



With the present issue Life completes the third 
year of its existence. From the first the paper has 
prospered. Receiving a generous support from 
students and alumni we feel that it has accomplished 
in a large measure the work it was intended it should 
perform. The last volume of the paper has been 
improved over the former in many respects. As 
the college grows and enlarges its scope so 
must the college paper enlarge its facilities 
for making all who are interested in the institution 
acquainted with the work it is accomplishing. The 
coming year will without doubt be an eventful one 
for M. A. C. The importance of the college paper 
will be felt to a greater extent than ever before. In 
order that the next volume of Aggie Life may be 
fully up to the standard as a representative college 
paper devoted to the interests of a rapidly advancing 
institution, we feel obliged to call for still better 
support from the alumni. While we are in a great 
measure indebted to the alumni for our present pros- 
perity, we cannot help but feel that there are a great 
many graduates of the college that have not as yet 
subscribed for the paper who would do so if the 



matter was brought to their notice. We sincerely 
hope that every loyal M. A. C. graduate who is not 
a subscriber for Aggie Life will send in his name 
at once. 



As Commencement sets up another land-mark in 
the history of the college, let us notice some of the 
changes which the past year has brought about. 
Many improvements have been made in the equip- 
ment of the various departments of the institution. 
Among the more important of these may be men- 
tioned the remodeling of the Durfee Plant House, 
the large additions to the Hatch Plant House, and 
the other needed improvements in the vicinity of the 
Botanic Museum, the laying of a floor in the drill- 
hall, the construction of the dam, and the large 
additions that have been made to the library and the 
museum of Natural History. The coming year, 
will, it is expected, witness still greater changes. 
The construction of a dairy school, the enlarging of 
the chemical laboratory, and the erection of new 
buildings for the Farm Department will, we hope, 
be included in the improvements that will have been 
made by the time the members of Ninety-four are 
completing their preparation for enrollment among 
the alumni of the M. A. C. The introduction of 
electives, the opening of new courses of study, and 
the increase of the corps of instructors will unite in 
aiding the college to maintain its reputation as a 
thoroughly progressive institution. 



We give elsewhere an account of the successful 
work during the past year of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. We are glad to record the 
fact that among us, as in all the leading colleges, 
the Association has won for itself an enduring and 
influential place in student life. Christian character 
is recognized as an essential element in athletics as 
well as in scholarship, because it is the foundation of 
noble manhood without which all contests are in 



194 



AGGIE LIFE. 



danger of degenerating into envious strife. Tlie 
social life of the students is greatly promoted by the 
Association. The annual reception given to the 
incoming class at the house of some member of the 
faculty introduces the new men to their new life. 
The rooms of the Association in the Stone Chapel 
are admirably fitted for conference meetings and 
Bible study, which afford the members ample facili- 
ties for moral and spiritual culture and for the 
exercise of that most potent of all elements of suc- 
cess, personal influence. Our Association from 
its intimate relations with the other college asso- 
ciations brings the members into direct affiliation 
with the best men in all departments of other insti- 
tutions at state and national meetings. The out- 
look for the coming year is most encouraging. We 
expect that at the start members of the new class 
will join the Association and secure for themselves 
its manv advantages. 



The base-ball season has once more come to a 
close. As the players lay away the ball and bat for 
the long vacation, they have the satisfaction of 
knowing that their work during the past term has 
been successful. One of the best advertisements a 
college can have is that furnished by its successfi'l 
athletic teams. We are glad to say that the Mass. 
Agricultural College has proved no exception to this 
rule. With a strong team under the guidance of a 
captain who thoroughly knows his business, and 
with a wide-awake manager who was aided in his 
work by the excellent financial support furnished by 
the college, the M. A. C. has accomplished a work 
on the diamond of which it should not be ashamed. 
The record of the college in base-ball does not 
depend, however, entirely on the number of games 
won, but it also depends upon the character of the 
opposing teams. We are glad to notice that during 
the last few years there has been a growing tendency 
for the management to arrange games with institu- 
tions of high rank and whose athletic teams have 
become well known in the world of college athletics. 
The importance of this policy cannot be over esti- 
mated, and we confidently expect that in arranging 
the schedule of games for 1894, still greater 
improvement in this direction will be made. 



Another Commencement, and another class is 



about to step forth to swell the ranks of our alumni. 
Year by year the members are steadily increasing, 
and the letters " M. A. C." bear a greater signifii- 
cance to a larger number of those who, heretofore, 
had but little interest in the institution they repre- 
sented. Yes, our college is certainly progressing 
in every department and we must attribute a portion 
of the praise of its success to the alumni who have 
so nobly upheld the honor of their alma mater in 
the days of darkness so well remembered by the 
older alumni, when it seemed as if this college, a 
pioneer in the great work, would become a thing of 
the past. It was the alumni who so heroically 
defended it at that time. By their unceasing efforts 
they placed it upon a foundation from which it can- 
not be moved. Those days are over. We, as a 
college, are thoroughly established and have demon- 
strated the need of such an institution in this state. 
But we still need your help and earnest support. 
The college is about to enter a new era in its exis- 
tence, and new lines of work will be commenced 
which can but prove to be for the best interests of 
the college. There are many ways in which you can 
help us, and the opportunity is continually before 
you to further the interests of the M. A. C. Will 
you do it ? 



The celebration by the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity 
of its twentieth anniversary brings somewhat prom- 
inentlj' before us the general subject of college 
societies. There is, on the part of some who are 
uninitiated, a general idea that college societies are 
not only useless but even harmful ; and we wish to 
take this opportunity to refute these ideas and show 
that the presence of flourishing societies in a college 
is something to be much desired. They are in fact 
a direct benefit to both the student and the c<^!lege. 
The society helps the student through the fraternal 
feeling which it generates, and which makes college 
life much more pleasant and homelike. Then again 
the friendly rivalry between different societies, which 
is merely the striving for excellence, benefits both 
the student and the college by raising the standard 
alTalong the line. It make? every man strive to do 
his best in his studies, in athletics, and causes him 
for his society's sake, if nothing else, to guard care- 
fully his words and actions. In this way the socie- 
ties of this college especially, are doing a good work 
and we hope that in the future they maj' be spared to 
flourish and continue in their well-doing. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



195 



^ommencf men'tt 



THE CHRISTIAN SCIENTIST. 



Baccaladreate Sermon Delivered June 18, 1893, 
BY Prof. C. 8. Walker, Ph. D. 



" To tMs end was I born, and for this cause came I into 
tlie world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. 
Everyone that is of the truth heareth my voice." John 
IS : 37. 

The scientist is one who knows, in its relations, 
that which is. His first essential characteristic is 
faith ; in himself, in human testimony, in the unseen. 
The intensity of his faith equals its extent. An- 
other trait is love of truth. To this he adds 
obedience to what the truth involves. His great 
incentive to action, the benefit of science, upon 
analysis proves to be love of humanity. Every true 
scientist is impelled to make discoveries thai he may 
give them to the world ; to conceal knowledge and 
hide invention is to commit an unpardonable sin. 
Thus characterized by faith, love of truth, obedience, 
and love of humanity, the scientist comes inevitably 
to add self-sacrifice to his other magnaminous traits. 
Out of all these hope is evolved. He finds many 
shadows and sombre depths. There are rctrogra- 
dations and lapses. The movement is indeed slow. 
Nature seldom seems to be in a hurry. But the 
movement, measured by eras and epochs, is a 
movement from darkness to light, from chaos to 
cosmos, from confusion to order. He recognizes a 
power, without beginning and without end, a power 
that works for righteousness ; the trend is upward 
and onward toward beneficence. 

In the rumble of all machinery and in the wonders 
of international life displayed at the Columbian Ex- 
position one cannot but perceive the handiwork and 
glorious results of the unobtrusive but creative 
genius of the scientist of the nineteenth century. 

But whence comes this scientist of to-day ? How 
comes it that there was no scientist of the ancient 
world ? Why do we talk of modern science ? With- 
out faith, love of truth, obedience, love of human- 
ity, self-sacrifice and hope, developed not only now 
and then in solitary bosoms, but planted as essen- 
tial traits in human nature, 'common possessions of 
common people, prevalent more or less among the 
community, both science and the scientist must be 
impossibilities. 



There is then a most intimate connection between 
Jesus of Nazareth who planted in human nature 
faith, love of truth, obedience, love of humanity, 
self-sacrifice and hope and made these traits so com- 
mon, and the scientist of the nineteenth century ; 
without the first there never could have been the 
latter. 

The scientist of the nineteenth century is thus 
revealed to be the Christian scientist. 

Forgetfulness of self and humility, accompanied 
by service to humanity, are some among many 
marks which prove the genuine scientist of to-day 
to be in reality the Christian scientist, whose life 
and beauty, like the perennial flow of the springs 
of the desert oasis, have their source in distant 
fountains distilled from heaven-kissed heights. 

Gentlemen of the Class of 1893 : — Seven years 
ago this chapel was publicly dedicated to a high and 
holy purpose. The President of the College, stand- 
ing in this pulpit, in his dedicatory remarks which 
are treasured among the records of the institution, 
said : 

" We are assembled for the first Sabbath in a 
structure built and furnished by the people of the 
state. It is a silent expression of the interest of 
the citizens that religious worship and religious cul- 
ture shall be maintained at this institution. Seasons 
may come and go. Class after class pass to the 
active duties of life, but these walls shall stand. 
They will stand as reminders of religious culture, 
helping those who come beneath their influence to a 
high and holy endeavor." 

These words of a former President have been 
since ratified by the action of the trustees in pro- 
viding a chaplain, in maintaining morning prayers 
and Sunday service, and in refusing to give up 
moral and religious influences as an essential part 
of educational training. 

The experience of generations has shown that a 
large body of youth, suddenly removed from the 
restraiiiing influences of home and their several 
communities, and where they are crowded in dorm- 
itories and left mostly to their own direction, need 
all the help they can get from the sanctions and 
motives of moral and religious services, to repress 
the evil oi human nature and to bring out and 
develope the best elements of manly character. 

Can you not all concur in the testimony which 



196 



AGGIE LIFE. 



some of yon have freely given, that the moral and 
religious atmosphere of the college life has been 
improving from year to year and becoming more 
efficient as an ally of sound scholarship and the 
advancement of science. 

Yonder stars and stripes, which the soldiers of 
this broad land call " Old Glory " are in themselves 
but a piece of bunting torn by the wind, but that 
flag of our country is a symbol which stirs in our 
souls the sentiments of loyalty and patriotism and 
heroism. Its silent eduotuional effects are greater 
than we can tell, over us all. 

So the granite walls and beautiful spire of our 
college chapel have been, during all these .years, in 
the midst of our student life, a powerful incentive to 
the development of solidity of character and spirit- 
ual power which are so essential to the production 
of the Christian scientist. 

These walls are an object lesson, to every passer- 
by and to the throngs that shall look upon their 
photograph in the Columbian Exposition, proclaim- 
ing that true science and true religion, both consist- 
ing of a knowledge of that which is true and obedience 
to all implied, are one and inseparable. 

You go fortli from these walls bachelors of science. 
You have taken your first degree. But you have 
made only a commencement. Go on as you have 
begun and you will find that the powers, endow- 
ments and joys of the Christian Scientist will become 
more and more your perpetual life. 



CAMPUS POEM. 



EDWIN CARLTON HOWARD. 



Our college days have swiftly flitted by, 

And as in days of yore you've gathered here 
To listen to the words of other tongues, 

Their tales of trials, joys, despair and cheer. 
We welcome you again to this dear spot 

Trusting that in our faces you may see 
Those virtues pictured, which our college mates 

Have long ascribed to men of Ninety-three. 

When first upon this soil our tender feet 

Took the first step in learning's rugged way, 
Faces were here and forms we used to know. 

And voices raised that are not heard today ; 
For some in other lands have gone to toil. 

In other walks the path to learning tread ; 
And some, though nearer, by the way have fallen 

As up to wisdow's shrine our steps were led. 



And one, our hearts grow sad as back to him 

We turn our thoughts, remember his bright smile, 
His jovial words, his open, winning ways, 

Yet he was with us but a little while, 
But one brief year, and then the reaper, Death, 

Came to our circle, took the fairest flower 
From out our garden, up to brighter scenes 

To blossom there in Heaven's celestial bower. 

As those before have told of joys and cares, 

We in our turn our story, too, will tell 
Of scenes and happenings of our college days, 

Whose added drops tradition's stream will swell; 
And though the tale may be but poorly told, 

Without the metre of a Laureate's song. 
We give this promise, which your patience craves, 

The tale will not be more than "Medium long." 

"When we first came on this campus, 

Freshmen we as green as grass." 
Runs the old song we have aU sung, 

And 'twas true of the present class. 
Yet there's method in some madness. 

And in greenness also, hence 
We've at last appeared as Seniors, 

Quite i-egardless of expense. 

Scarce had a week flown o'er our heads 

When from the flag-pole's height 
A banner, with our figures, shone 

As day was dawning bright. 
And the whole college did admit, 

As in the clear sunlight 
Our banner floated, "That's a class 

That beats ours out of sight. 
For most of us had not the 'sand' 

To take a stand for right 
And put a banner on the pole 

Until it was Freshman night." 

But anyone could put a flag 

Upon the college staff. 
And classes long before, and since 

Have done it, while we'd laugh 
And point to one heroic deed 

We did, or just a few 
Did for the class ; and 'tis my lot 

To tell the tale to you. 

For years the clock face, black and grim. 

Had stood with watchful eye. 
No hand upon it told the hour 

To any passer-by, 
And so we thought, and rightly too. 

That 'twas a hlmk disgrace 
To see that tower standing there 

With nothing on its face. 
So four brave youths one night, set out 

Renown and fame to seek , 



AGGIE LIFE. 



197 



To place the flg'ures '"93" 

Upon Its sombre cheek. 
Dark silence reigned. The deed was done ; 

Our "Index" tells you how; 
'Twould be a waste of time for me 

To recount the story now ; 
But ever siuce the Chapel tower 

Has up to Heaven pointed, 
Our class alone Its face has marked, 

With brilliant paint annointed. 

This much for paint : the sidewalk's tale 

By every class is told, 
And should I tell of that, 'twould be 

A story centuries old. 
But one tale more, and Freshman year 

Is counted with the past, 
And, as at dinners, I have kept 

The best until the last. 

Some rushes we had had before, 

Out on Botanic walk 
Or in the entries, or on field ; 

They gave us ground for talk. 
For each to tell the deeds he'd done. 

To classmates on the lawn. 
But these were small alfalrs compared 

With what was yet to dawn. 

From chapel as we came one morn, 

Forgetful of our place, 
With eager feet each hastened on 

To his accustomed place 
When lo ! before the Sophomores 

We reached the outer door. 
Then rose such sounds of conflict 

As were never heard before. 

And Stone came charging down on Joe, 

And Crane, poor Wells did spy 
While Hendy, Bart, and Eanney, too. 

And Stape made feathers fly. 
And Ninety-three held up her end, 

For who has known the day 
When any fight was going. 

And we not in the fray? 

But hotter, fiercer, raged the fight. 

And oaths and curses fiew 
And Ninety-three gave promise strong, 

Of swiping Ninety-two, 
When a new force comes on the field 

And fights so valiantly 
That one would think them Sophs themselves 

Instead of Faculty. 

Prof Billy grabs a struggling youth 
And fires him to the floor, 



And other Profs, grab other men 

And shove them out the door ; 
"Doc." makes a vicious poke at Stone, 

Then Stone lifts up his voice 
Anathemlzing Doctor 

In words more true than choice. 

And so the battle fiercely raged, 

That's all there is to tell; 
And Stone and Woodbrey both were flred 

And Gregory sent to — South America. 

A year of college life has flitted on. 

Again we turn the page of history o'er ; 
New vistas open to our raptured gaze, 

For each is now an honored Sophomore. 

And oh, the meaning of that magic word ! 

More wisdom, power, with all its fond delights ; 
New Freshmen here to watch with guardian care 

And see they do not stay out too late nights. 

Our ranks reduced, but onward still we press, 
One milestone passed, but others are before 

Which we must leave behind, still looking on 
To Ijrighter scenes, ere college life is o'er. 

The grim destroyer. Death, claims for his own 
Our classmate, Harvey, takes him in the day 

Of budding manhood. We, without his help 
Must fight the battle, forward urge our way. 

'Twould be a tiresome tale to tell you all 
We did that year, go ask our college mates. 

Yet if they told the truth, I much do fear 
They'd make us out a set of reprobates. 

But Sophomores are always bold, bad men, 
And envious tongues would teU a tale so black 

That were it only true, you well might say 
Our virtues lay in that which we did lack. 

The scene now changes, and so does the metre. 

For Junior year now dawns on our view, 
The year, so tradition goes, when each deceiver 

Has broken some heart, or tried very hard to. 

North Amherst, and East Street, and "Hamp" were the 

" places 

Our "Bloods" used to seek for the fair ones so dear. 
And Petit's receptions, and all the church socials. 

South Hadley and Smith's too, a few times a year. 

Poor girls ! how we pity you now, as our memory 
Turns back to the pleasures you tried hard to give. 

As we think of the ice-cream and cake that you lavished, 
But then, " "Tis more blessed to give than receive." 

But 'tis harder for us to apply that same motto 

When we think of our pocket-books, empty and flat. 

Of the money we've spent in pursuit of your pleasure. 
For presents, and tickets, and flowers, and aU that. 



igS 



AGGIE LIFE. 



But we gi-udge not one cent to you now dearest maidens, 
Only one last request as your presence we leave : 

Smile as fondly and sweetly on those who shall follow 
As you used to on us, and our blessing receive. 

Too swiftly, all too swiftly fled those happy days 
And on we sped toward Senior pomp and power. 

Mishaps we had, suspensions for quick "Bolting" 
And trifling troubles, lasting for an hour. 

But smoothly on our way we went rejoicing. 
The verdant Freshmen, 'neath our watchful care. 

Doing their best to follow our example 
Of labor, study, and of virtue rare. 

And Freshman night comes on, and passes over. 
And nobly do the FresMes play their part. 

For though afar they went to appease their hunger. 
They left a token coming from the heai't. 

So down to Chase's went the frisky Juniors 

And filled up to the very upper border 
While "Snowflake" threatened us with his attorney 

And Potter said that we were "out of order." 

And then commencement came, when in these portals 
Old Ninety-two closed her career of strife. 

The class — our enemy in hard fought battles, 
The men— our friends through toils and cares of life. 

Now Senior year breaks on our view. 

The end is drawing near. 
And yet 'tis hard to bear in mhid 

That only one brief year 
Will bring us to the end of joys 

And cares of college life. 
That in another twelve-month we 

Must enter labor's strife. 

Huge bugbears of the gravest kind 

Confront us on the way. 
"Vet." and Psychology did keep 

The class almost at bay. 
We studied hard, till now with ease 

The hardest names we say, 
Necrosis, Caries, Anchylose 

All are as plain as day. 

And pawns with various concepts too : 

The Doctor took them out. 
Then told us how he climbed a tree 

That he might look about. 
And then, when talking of our "Prom" 

When that discussion came, 
This same "Old Doctor," ^aiuned his word 

And played a double game. 

(At least, that's how it seemed to us. 

But he thought differently 
So called the poet to his room 

And heavily jumped on me. 
He said he didn't pawn his word 



He'd acted with decision, 
And made the whole thing seem so plain 
Pve put in this addition.) 

The year speeds on with quickening pace, 

The autumn hastens by. 
Grim winter stares us in the face 

But soon his cold months fly 
And gentle Spring is here once more 

And the green leaves unfold 
With verdure clad, while the Freshmen 
^ Show less greenness than of old. 

Orations, theses, take our time. 

And so great is the strain 
You could tell us from a distance 

By pi'eponderance of brain. 
With sombre mien and stately step. 

Our frisky days are o'er. 
You'd think not one had ever been 

A dashing Sophomore. 

And so at last we've reached this day 

When we must bid farewell 
To scenes, and friends, and memories dear 

And go, the throng to swell, 
Who, in the outer world for life. 

Success, and fame, aspire, 
With this our aim : that Ninety-three 

Shall raise her standard higher 
Than e'er before a class has dared 

To lift her sign, each hour 
Eesolved that all the world shall know 
, The truth — "Knowledge is power." 

Thus runs the tale which choice or lot 

Has given me to tell. 
And though to you it may not seem 

O'er laden with the spell 
Of mystic charm, to us it brings 

The scenes of bygone days 
And conjures up before our eyes 

Deeds worthy shame, or praise. 

We leave these halls with many a pang. 

These scenes with pleasure fraught, 
These happy days, through all our lives 

Will never be forgot. 
Then on life's ocean launch our bark. 

United now we stand. 
Though ocean waves may roll between 

They cannot break the band 
Which four long years of brotherhood 

Have forged with bonds of love. 
While God shall give us breath of life, 

Together shall we move, 
A score of minds, a single heart 

As onward still we press 
Till death shall break the golden cord 

And make our number less. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



199 



And now dear classmates, one and all, 

We take our lone and several way 
To meet the summons of life's call ; 

Our faces towards the opening day 
That welcomes us with morning sun, 

In Ufe's long race to nobly run, 
And with the cordial word "Well done,' 

Eeceive the prize our toil has won. 



THE PRESIDENTS ADDRESS. 
Not quite eight huncU'ed years ago in a small city 
in tlie south of Europe was gathered an immense 
assembly. * * » It was no ordinary event that 
had brought together men of such varying race and 
language and stirred them witn a common purpose. 
The fate of Christian Europe was banging in the 
balance. * * * One thought, one single pur- 
pose animated every heart, the rescue of the Holy 
Land and Sepulchre. After days of tedious 
deliberation, at length the time seemed right for 
action. * * * In the midst of this confusion, 
the great churchman, Pope Urban II rose. With 
matchless eloquence, he portrayed the captivity and 
misfortunes of Jerusalem and called upon his 
hearers to revenge the insults offered to divinity and 
not to man. Then turning directly to them, he 
esclaimed : "Christian warriors who seek without 
end for vain pretexts for war, rejoice for yon have 
to-day found true ones You who have been so 
often the terror of your fellow citizens go and fight 
against the barbarians, go and fight for the deliv- 
erance of the holy places * * *" At these 
words, an indescribable fury took possession of the 
vast assembly. With frenzied cries leaping to 
their feet and brandishing their swords, as with one 
voice they shoutad "God wills it." The die was 
cast and when the meeting was dissolved and its 
members departed to their homes, it was only to 
return the following year and join the gathering 
host, the first of those great armies which for two 
hundred years prolonged the contest and deluged 
the fertile plains of Palestine and Asia Minor with 
blood. * » » 

Gentlemen of the Graduating Class. It is not 
without a purpose that I have outlined to you to- 
day this story of the first'crusade. It is the same 
lesson repeating itself. The fixed resolve, the will 
to do, the soul to dare and victory at last. Those 
same grand principles which move to action and 



success lie dormant in the hearts of each of you and 
need but the burning touch of enthusiasm to 
brighten into flame. Remember that he "who does 
the best his circumstances allows, does well, acts 
nobly; angels could no more." But with this, to 
ensure success, must be united an all absorbing 
enthusiasm, an enthusiasm which as its name 
implies is born of God, for that is the inspiration 
of all things great and noble. The poor, unlettered 
monk, inspired with pity for his fellow men and 
filled with a divine belief in himself and in his mis- 
sion, stirred Europe to its centre and inaugurated a 
movement which never ended till it broke upon the 
shores of Palestine. His burning words found 
ready faith in the hearts of men, and the eloquent 
pontiff who followed him seizing upon the uncon- 
scious expression of the will of the multitude gave 
to it a creed and battle cry, by which to live and 
die. God wills it and on the plains of Ascalon the 
pagan hosts flee utterly discomfited before the 
Christian heroes. God wills it and at Tyre, the 
chivalry of Europe hurst through the solid masses 
of the infidels. God wills it and the lofty walls 
and moated battlements are but as broken reeds 
and the triumphant army sweeps in and takes 
possession of Jerusalem. And so too in the battles 
and successes of our daily life. God wills it and 
the powers of darkness oppose in vain. God wills 
it and truth and rit!hteonsness prevails. God wills 
it and victory and heaven at last. 

The courage required of you to-day is far higher 
than that demanded of the hardy warrior of the 
eleventh century. To stand for right for right's 
own sake — to oppose the wrong because it is wrong, 
in face of a debased public opinion — to lend one's 
influence in bringing to a higher level the public 
sense of morality and integrity requires a truer, 
manlier courage. There never was a more urgent 
demand for honest, honorable and loyal citizens. 
Corruption in political life, dishonesty in ofHee, lax- 
ity in morals, atheism lurking under the guise of 
freedom of thought, intemperance, anarchy and 
crime, all these confront you at every turn. "Cov- 
enants are of no use without honest men to keep 
them ; laws of none, but with loyal citizens to obey 
them." 

Children of the state, the state has need of you. 
Children of humanity, the world is calling for you. 
As we send you forth to battle for the right, be this 
our parting message : 

"Love thyself last ; cherish the hearts that hate thee ; 

* * * * Be just and fear not ; 
Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's, 
Thy God's and truth's ; then if thou f aU'st, O 
Thou fall'st a blessed martyr." 



200 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^ndar, 



Saturday, June 17. — Grinnell Examination, 
Sunday, June 18. — Baccalaureate sermon, 

Address before Y. M. C. A., 
Monday, June 19. — Chapel, President's address, 8 

Flint Oratorical Contest, 

Freshman and Sophomore Speaking, 

Society Banquets, 
Tuesday, June 20. — Trustee Meeting, 

P. S. K. Anniversary. 

Meeting of Hatch Exp. Station, 

Alumni Dinner, 

Class Day Exercises, 

Military Exercises, 

President's Reception, 

Senior Promenade, 
Wednesday, June 21.— Graduating Exercises, 
Thursday, June 22. — Entrance Examinations, 



8-30 a. 


M. 


10.45 A. 


M 


8.00 P. 


M. 


, 8.15 a. 


M. 


3.30 p. 


M. 


8.00 p. 


M. 


10.00 P. 


M. 


9.30 A. 


M. 


10.00 A. 


M. 


11.30 a. 


M. 


1.00 p. 


M. 


2.00 P. 


M. 


4.30 p 


M. 


8.00 P. 


M. 


9-30 P. 


M. 


10.00 A. 


M. 


9.00 a 


M. 



©Ile^<? flot^S. 



— Mason, '95, has left college. 

— Sub-Freshmen are appearing. 

— H. G. Stockwell is recovering from bis severe 
illness. 

— The Flint Prize speakers were photographed 
by Scbillare, June 9. 

— The game scheduled to be played at Worcester 
June 3d, was cancelled by the Tech. management. 

— Through the exertion of a numbei' of enterpris 
ing students the poud was filled with Pelham water 
last week. 

— The new uniforms next fall will probably be 
manufactured from blue cloth instead of the material 
now in use 

— A pleasant occurrence at the D. G. K. house 
last week was the presentation of a watch chain and 
charm to Dan. 

— Prof. C. S. Walker delivered a lecture, June 13, 
in Williamstown, under the auspices of the Green 
River Grange. 

— C. L. Brown, '94. and S. Kuroda, '95, will 
represent the college Y. M. C. A. at the Northfield 
convention in July. 

— The growth of the library during the past year 
has been very satisfactory. About 14,050 volumes 
are now catalogued. 



— The college appropriation bill, with the amend- 
ment providing for a floor in the drill-hall was 
passed in the legislature last week. 

— A large force of men has been employed dur- 
ing the past week in laying a floor in the drill-hall, 
in preparation for the promenade Tuesday night. 

— The last remaining copies of Ninety-four's In- 
dex are now on sale. Those who desire them should 
buy at once as the edition is very nearly exhausted. 

— At a meeting of the college baseball team, June 
14th, E. H. Clark, '95, was elected captain and T. 
S. Bacon, '94, was elected manager for the season 
of 1894. 

— Col. R. P. Hughes, U. S. A., made his annual 
inspection of the battalion last Friday and Saturday. 
After a drill lasting an hour and a half, the program 
was varied by an exciting sham battle on the west 
slope of Mt. Pleasant. 

— Rev. Edward Everett Hale of Boston was the 
guest of Prof, and Mrs. Maynard, June 5 and 6. 
On Monday evening an informal reception was held 
at which members of the college were invited. On 
Tuesday morning Dr. Hale took charge of chapel 
exercises and spoke a few moments to the students. 
His visit was enjoyed very mucii by the whole 
cpllege. 

— The Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity celebraled its 
twentieth anniversary by public exercises held in 
the Stone Chapel this morning. Rev. Henry Hague, 
'72, of So. Worcester, was the orator. Addresses 
of comity were delivered by Prof. H.E.Stookbridge, 
'78, of Fargo, N. D., representing the 1). G. K. 
fraternity, by Mr. David Barry, '90, of Amherst, 
representing the Q. T. V. fraternity, an d by Dr. 
J. B. Liudsey, '83, representing the College 
Shakespearean Club. 

— The following was the program of the Fresh- 
man and Sophomore Prize Speaking Monday even- 
ing : Freshmen — H. C. Burrington, '"Charles Sum- 
ner ;" S. de V Sastre, "Crime its Own Detector ;" 
F. L. Clapp, "The Heroism of Horatio Nelson;" 
P. A. Leamy, "The Tomb of Washington." 
Sophomores — S. P. Toole. "Assault on Wagner;" 
S. Kuroda, "The Gladiator;" T.P.Foley, "The 
Amnesty of Jefferson Davis;" E. H. Clark, "The 
Chariot Race." Music was furnished during the 
intermission by the college glee club. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



201 



— "English, you know !" 

— Senior vacation lust week. 

— The Y. M. C. A. hand-book contains a neat 
map of the college grounds. 

— The senior class supper will be held at the Cooley 
House, Springfield, June 21. 

— The class of Ninetj'-three has laid out a very 
ornamental flower-bed in front of South College. 

— The Senior Promenade will be held at 9.30 ihis 
evening in the drill hall. Dance tickets are sold for 
three dollars. Spectators may gain admission for 
fifty cents. 

— May 30th, Memorial Day, two voluntary com- 
panies from the battalion paraded with the local G. 
A. R. post and Co. K of the militia. After the 
exercises a collation was provided. 

— At a meeting of the Prohibition Club held June 
9th, the following officers were elected : president, 
J. H. Putnam; vice-presidents, F. L. ixreeue, W. 
L. Bemis ; secretary, E. H. Henderson; treasurer, 
H. D. Hemenway. 

— In another column we publisli a communication 
from the Western Alumni Association relative to the 
interests of the college at the Columbian Exposition. 
We hope everyone connected with the M. A. C. will 
do all in his power to aid the association in their 
efforts to promote a better acquaintance among the 
students and alumni of the college, and to contribute 
to the pleasure and profit of a visit to the Fair. 

— Last Thursday evening the junior class went 
down town in a body and called at the house of 
Prof. Warner, where A. C. Curtis, with appropriate 
remarks presented the professor with a handsome 
cane as a testimonial of regard from Ninety-four. 
The professor, although taken completely by sur- 
prise, replied in his usual pleasant manner, thanking 
the class most heartily for their appreciation of his 
services. 

— Lieut. Wadhams, U. S. N., gave a very inter- 
esting lecture in the Town Hall, June 9, under the 
management of the Union course. His subject was 
"Our New Navy." He illustrated his remarks by 
a large number of fine stereopticon views of objects 
relating to the navy. His-vivid portrayal of life on 
a man-of-war and his thrilling accounts of adven- 
tures on sea and shore held the attention of his audi- 
ence from beginning to end. 



— F. S. Hoyt received first military prize and E. 
H. Lehnert, second. 

— Ninety's class reunion was omitted on account 
of the impossibility of securing a good attendance. 

— The senior class has issued very artistic invi- 
tations to the promenade and to the Commencement 
exercises the following day. 

— The junior class was invited to the house of 
Prof, and Mrs. Fernald, June 7th, to examine their 
valuable collections of insects. 

—J. Baker, '93, and T. F. Keith, '94, were the 
winners of two prizes for essays offered by the 
Boston Alumni Chapter of Q. T. V. 

— Rev. A. E. Dunning of Boston, editor of The 
Congregationalist, gave the annual address before 
the Y. M. C. A. Sunday evening before a large and 
appreciative audience. His theme was Problems of 
Life. 

— The program for the Flint Prize Oratorical 
Contest was as follows: G. H. Merwin. "The 
Decadence of Our Nation ;" A. H. Kirkland, "Crises 
and Character ;" E. D. White, "Our Duty to the 
Freedman;"C. F. Walker, "John Ericsson," F. G. 
Averill, Fanaticism in History;" A. C. Curtis, 
"Responsibility of the American Citizen." The 
M. A. C. orchestra furnished music during the 
intermission. 

— For the first time in years the last Friday night 
of the spring term was without class demonstration 
of any kind: students and townspeople alike were 
allowed to enjoy a good night's rest. To the classes 
of Ninety-five and Ninety-six belongs the honor of 
having demonstrated that loyalty to college and to 
class may find expression in actions much more 
creditable than were many of those which accom- 
panied the old freshman night celebrations. 

— The society banquets were held Monday night 
as is the custom. The D. G. K. fraternity and the 
College Shakespearean Club were accommodated at 
the Amherst House. A meeting of the corporation 
of the latter organization was held in connection 
with the banquet. The local chapter of Q. T. V. 
held their reunion and banquet in their society hall 
while the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity dined at Barr's 
at Northampton, going over on a special train. 



202 



AGGIE LIFE^ 



BASE-BALL ASSOCIATION. 


TRBASTJREE'S REPORT. 

C'r. 
Brought forward 




,$76.08 


Kec'd from subscription 


373.57 


To be collected from subscription 


40.43 


Rec'd from guarantees, etc. 


95.60 




C-KOK CO 






Dr. 




Paid for equipments 


•$123.50 


"Worlj done 


9.40 


Screen and glass in Drill Hall 


35.78 


Traveling expenses 


40.71 


Guarantees 


80.00 


Training 


28.50 


Express and telegrams 


8.05 


Miscellaneous 


14.97 


Uniforms 


37.88 


To Hartford 


58.08 


To Worcester 


44.84 




$491.71 


Balance on hand June 17, 1893 


93.97 



.$585.68 
Respectfully submitted, 

P. E. Davis, Sec. and Treas. 



BATTALION APPOINTMENTS. 
1st. Lieut, and Adjutant, H. V. Smead. 
1st. Lieut, and Quartermaster, L. H. Bacon. 
Ist. Lieut, and Fire Marshal, C. L. Brown. 
1st. Lieut, and Band Leader, J. H. Putuara. 
Drum Major, P. E. Davis. 

Captains, G.H. Merwin,T. S. Bacon, J. E. Gifford. 
1st. Lieutenants, A. H. Kirltland, L. Manley, S. F. 

Howard. 
2nd. Lieutenants, C. H. Spaulding, A. J. Motse, 

H. M. Fowler. 
Sergeant Major, E. H. Clark. 
Quartermaster Sergeant, J. S. Goodell. 
Band Sergeant, E. O. Bagg. 
Color Sergeant, H. B. Read. 
Color Corporals, G. A. Billings, W. A. Bemis. 
First Sergeants, R. A. Cooley, F. L. Warren, H. 

S. Fairbanks. 
Sergeants, C. W. Crehore, M. J. Sullivan, R. S. 

Jones, .J. Marsii, W. L. Morse, T. P. Foley. 
Corporals, H. L. Frost, S. P. Toole, F. C. Tobey, 

A. B. Smith, S. Kuroda, H. E. Clark. E. H. 

Henderson, H. D. Hemenway, R. W. Drury, C. 

M. Dickinson. 



THE CYCLE. 
The fifteenth volume of the Cycle, published by 
the D. G. K. fraternity is of unusual excellence 
both as a literary and as a news publication. 



Among the articles it contains the following are es- 
pecially worthy of mention: "A Plea for Our 
Athletic Field,""A Fanciful Sketch, ""Our Athletic 
Standing," "The Mystery of Her Hair." These 
with many items of news and the wide awake edit- 
orials make the Cycle for 1893 a publication which 
every M. A. C. man should possess. 



FRESHMAN BANQUET. 

Following the custom now becoming general in 
our colleges, the Freshman Class went out of town 
for their class banquet. It was held Friday, the 
9th, at the Hotel Hamilton, Holyoke. The affair 
was a grand success in every respect. The supper 
was faultless : the management could not have been 
better, and, best of all, every one had a good time. 
It is one of the most important events in the stu- 
dent's college life, and Ninety-six is to be congratu- 
lated on the successful manner in which they con- 
ducted the affair. 

The class reached Holyoke at 6 : 30, and the fel- 
lows spent the early part of the evening "doing the 
town." At 9 : 30 they met at the hotel and proceed- 
ed to the dining hall, where the banquet was served. 
The menus were tastefully gotten up, being printed 
on heavy white silk, making a very neat souvenir 
of the occasion. 

W. B. Harper oflSciated as toastmaster, and the 
following were the toasts and respondents : "Aggie." 
W. L. Pentecost; "Athletics," H. C. Burrington ; 
"Owl Club," H. W. Rawson; "Our Plants," C. A. 
Nutting; "Alumni." J. E. Green ; "The Faculty," 
A. Davis; "Our Class," F. L. Clapp ; "Societies," 
H. W. Moore; "Press Club," M. E. Sellew ; "Our 
Foot-ball Players," F. P. Washburn ; "Closed Por- 
tals," W. B. Dodge; "Our Polo Players," F. L. 
Marshall; "Aggie Life," R. L. Hayward ; "Proph- 
ecy," G. Day ; Class Poem, W. D. Shurtlefif 

Everything passed off pleasantly, the only draw- 
back being the absence of the popular president of 
class, W. J. Curley, and P. A. Leamy, who were 
obliged to stay away on account of having to play 
in Saturday's game. 

The class returned Saturday morning, filled with 
the concious joy of having had a glorious time and 
of having done credit to themselves and to their Col- 
lege. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



203 



BASE-BALL STATISTICS. 
The base-ball season of '93 was most successful 
in every way, as a general thing, although at times 
the team itself put up rather poor ball. Perhaps 
the best game of the season was the first game 
with Worcester Tech. and the poorest the second 
game with Trinity. The work of the Curley 
brothers, Bagg, F. Read and Clark was commend- 
able throughout the season. 



April 15, Worcester Tech. vs 


Aggie, 


Amherst, 


7—3 


" 22. Mt. 


Hermon 














2—9 


" 26. Amherst '96 




" 






' 




3—10 


" 29. Worcester Tech. 


(( 




Worcester 


14—8 


May 13. Trinity 




" 




Hartford 


7—25 


" 27. 






" 




Amherst 


6—11 


•• 31. Williston 




" 




Easthampton 4 — 9 


June 10. 


" 




" 




Amherst 


4—1 








6 Victories. 


3 Defeats. 


Euns, 


Aggie 76 




Opponents, 




47. 




Hits, 


'■ 60. 












70. 




Errors, 


" 35. 












52. 




Stolen Bases 


" 58. 












47. 




Earned Euns 


" 17. 












19. 




1st Base on Balls " 46. 












22. 




Men Struck Out " 38. 






' 






52. 






BATTING AVERAGES 










Rank Name Games At Bat 


Runs 


Hits 


Total Bases 


S. H 


. Av. 


1 G. Curley 


8 33 


10 


12' 




15 




1 


.375 


2 Howard 


8 31 


7 


9 




9 




1 


.300 


3 Clark 


8 32 


10 


8 




10 




2 


.262 


4 W. Curley 


8 30 


13 


7 




8 




1 


.241 


5 Leamy 


4 17 


3 


3 




3 




4 


.214 


6 Sullivan 


8 32 


10 


6 




6 




2 


.200 


7 Eead, '95 


8 38 


1 


5 




5 




2 


.196 


„ / Jones 
^Day 


5 16 


8 


3 




3 







.187 


4 16 


2 


3 




5 







.187 


9 Bagg 


5 21 


3 


2 




2 




1 


.100 


10 Eead '96 


7 27 


1 


5 




6 




1 


.076 


11 Burgess 


1 3 


















.000 




FIELDING AVERAGES 










E. Name 


Games 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Total chances 


Av. 


, [ G. Curley p If 8 


11 


40 







51 




1.000 


'■ \ Sullivan r 


E 8 


3 










3 




1.000 


2 W. Curley c 


8 


57 


13 


1 




71 




.986 


3 Eead '95 lb 


8 


82 


26 


2 




60 




.958 


4 Leamy 


4 


6 


4 


2 




12 




.858 


5 Eead '96 ss 


7 


4 


28 


6 




38 




.844 


6 Bagg lb 


5 


51 





7 




58 




.834 


7 Clark 2b 


8 


21 


8 


6 




35 




.832 


8 Howard cf 


8 


13 


2 


4 




19 




.792 


9 Jones 


5 


5 





2 




7 




.778 


10 Day 


4 


7 


4 


5 




16 




.690 


11 Burgess 


1 





1 







1 




1.000 


Statistics Compiled by T. F 


. Keith 


,'94, 










Scorer Season '93. 



JUNIOR BANQUET. 

Promptly at ten p. m. on the evening of June 9th, 
the class of '94 assembled at the Amherst House to 
partake of the banquet tendered them by the class 
of '96. 

After doing full justice to a most excellent menu, 



A. J. Morse commenced the post-prandial exercises 
by introducing the class octette, which furnished 
most acceptable music for the occasion. The toast- 
master then introduced D. E. White, whose topic 
was "The Class of '96." Mr. Leamy and W. W. 
Curley, both of '96, responded in behalf of their 
class. G. H. Merwin spoke on "Electives," and 
Kirkland eulogized the " Faculty." L. Manley 
expatiated on the glories of " Field-day." Keith 
humorously described the events of the class trip. 
Curtis told of the trials of the Index Board, and H. 
M. Fowler spoke for the " Ladies." Boardman 
recalled the events of '94's "Freshman Night," while 
Gifford's speech on " '94 " finished the list of toasts. 
The singing of college songs, ending with the class 
song written for the occasion, closed a most pleasant 
and memorable evening. 



COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 

M. A. C. HEADQUARTERS. 

The Western Alumni Association desires to extend 
to the alumni and students of M. A. C. throughout 
the country a hearty invitation to visit the World's 
Columbian Exposition at Chicago, and in so far as 
possible to show the hospitality which the occasion 
demands. 

Realizing the magnitude of the Fair, and the 
necessity for visitors who come for but a short time 
to make the most of their stay at the Fair, the fol- 
lowing plan is proposed, which it is the hope of the 
Western Association may be carried out by visiting 
alumni and students. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has erected 
an especially appropriate building for the conven- 
ience of Massachusetts visitors ; while it is not 
within the province of this building to apportion any 
specified room for meetings, it can be made a rendez- 
vous for alumni and students ; a register is provided 
by the State, in which you are requested to register 
your names with " M. A. C," class, and Chicago 
address. It is suggested that the hour between four 
and five in the afternoon be generally understood as 
the time when friends and alumni of M. A. C. 
should visit the State building. Let us all make an 
effort to give part of the above hour toward further- 
ing our mutual acquaintance, and by so doing, the 
interests of our Alma Mater. It is impossible to 
appoint a reception committee, but each alumnus or 



204 



AGGIE LIFE. 



student is especially requested to make himself 
known, and to help in furthering the acquaintance 
of those who ma}' be present at the time. The 
register will be carefully watched hy the Western 
Association, and at such times as the greatest 
number of alumni may be present in Chicago, a ban- 
quet vvill be arranged. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OF M. A. C. 

It can now be said of the College Young Men's 
Christian Association that it is the greatest student 
movement of the world. Since 1887, when an asso- 
ciation was first organized at M. A. C, the move- 
ment has proved to be of inestimable value to col- 
lege men. Its influence has not only kept many a 
young man on the right track during his four years 
in college, but has also helped to fit him to go out 
in the world and live a life of greater usefulness. 

Although tuUy realizing that a wide field for 
Christian work is still open at M. A. C, yet a com- 
parison of our association with those of other insti- 
tutions, shows that in proportion to the size ot the 
college, we stand above the average. It is a grati- 
fying fact that the past year has been one of steady 
growth. Prayer meetings have been well attended 
and much interest has been manifested. 

The year's work began with a reception to the 
incoming class, held at the home of Prof. Brooks. 
This affurded an excellent opportunity for getting 
acquainted. It served also to impress upon the 
minds of the new students that we had an active Y. 
M. C. A., and that thej- were cordially invited to 
join us. Although the association was not rein- 
forced by as many men from the freshman class as 
we had hoped for, yet we have reason to feel 
encouraged. 

Duri'ig the year seventy-one prayer meetings 
have been held with an average attendance of thirty- 
seven in the fall term, thirty-two in the winter term, 
and nineteen in the spring term. A Bible class con- 
ducted by Prof. Mills has met for study on Sunday 
mornings throughout the year. The average at- 
tendance has been sixteen. 

I'he number of members at present is as follows : 
seniors, seven active and three associate ; juniors, 
seven active and eleven associate ; sophomores, 
twelve active and ten associate ; freshman, six 
active and eight associate ; total, thirty-two active 
and thirty-two associate. 



The following persons have addressed the asso- 
ciation during the year : Dr. J. B. Lindsey, M. A. 
C. '83. Mr. W. G. Lotze of Boston, Mr. K. S. 
Thabue of Burmah, Mr. W. C. Paige, M. A. C. '91, 
and Rev. A. E. Dunning of Boston. 

The missionary committee began work early in 
the year, and through their efforts the members 
have given $60.00 for the support of a native pastor 
in India, and So.dO to aid a Y. M. C. A. at Port 
Townsend, Washington. 

The association has been represented at the fol- 
lowing conferences : Student's Conference at North- 
field, District Conferences at Pittsfield and Monson 
and Presidential Conference at Cambridge. 

The Student's Handbook has been issued for the 
third time, and is now ready for distribution. It is 
hoped that this little book will not only be a valu- 
able aid to every new student during his first few 
days at M. A. C, but that it will eventually lead 
him to join our association. 

The Y. M. C. A. is certainly filling a place at 
M. A. C. which no other organization could. With 
"Christian work for and by young men" for its 
motto, it will long continue to be a mighty power 
for good. The members, if they only will, can 
make the association felt in the college during the 
coming year, more than it has ever been before. By 
all means let every man enjoy the benefits of the 
association by attending as many as possible of its 
prayer meetings and Bible classes. Thus, by train- 
ing men to go out and live practical Christian lives, 
will our Y. M. C. A. have accomplished that for 
which it was founded. 



We welcome to our table for the first time the 
"T7. P. I." of Worcester Tech. '-College Life" 
comes to us greatly enlarged and with many illus- 
trations, as a commencement number. The Will- 
iams Weekly, Dartmouth and Brown Daily Herald 
are as usual highly prized for base-ball gossip ; but 
perhaps the exchange which receives the warmest 
welcome to the editor's table is that charming, deli- 
cate, but highly interesting magazine, '■'■The Mt. 
Holyoke." The Sviarthmore Phoenix, Phcenixian, 
Bates Student, S. IT. I. Quill, Purdue Exponent and 
" r/te Cadet" are among the papers which are worthy 
ot mention. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



205 



BASEBALL. 

M. A. C, 9 ; WiLLisTON, 4. 

The college team crossed bats with Williston at 
Easthampton, Wednesday May 31, for the first time 
in three years and defeated them 9 to 4. Previous 
to the ninth inning the game belonged to anybody, 
but at this point Aggie braced up and aided by three 
costly errors and several fine hits four runs were 
scored. With this lead against them, Williston 
came to the bat with great determination but 
Barber filed out to Sullivan, aud Leamy took in a 
most difficult foul ball, and with H. Read made a 
double play retiring Williston and ending the game. 
Aggie played a fine fielding game, but displayed her 
usual weakness at the bat. The features of the 
game were Rosa's home rnn, Westcott's and Jones's 
fielding. The score : 



F. Eead, ss, 
W. Curley, c, 
Sullivan, rf , 

G. Curley, p, 
Clark, 2b, 
Leamy, 3b, 
H. Read, lb, 
Howard, cf, 
Jones, If, 

Total, 



Barber, cf, 
Rosa, If, 
Fletcher, 2b, 
Tyler, c, 
Keator, p, 
Tarbell, 3b, 
Chapman, rf , 
Westcott, ss, 
Peix, lb. 

Total, 

Innings, 
M. A. C, 
Williston, 



A E 
4 
4 
5 
5 
5 
4 
5 
3 
4 



IB TE SH PO 



27 15 



WILLISTON. 



IE TE SH PO 



4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 

35 





1 
1 

11 







11 1 27 13 



1 2 
1 




4 5 6 7 8 
3 1 
2 



9 

I— 9 
0— 4 



Times at bat— Aggie 39, Williston 36. Earned runs— Aggie 1, 
Williston 2. Total bases— Aggie 6, Williston 11. Sacrifice liit-PeLx. 
Stolen bases— G. Curley, Clark, H. Read, Howard, Barber 3. Two- 
base hit^Fletcher. Home run— Rosa. First base on balls— F. 
Read, Leamy, Howard, Barker 2. First base on errors— Aggie 5, 
Williston 2. Left on bases— Aggie 6, Williston 7. Struck out— F. 
Eead 2, W. Curley, SulUvau, G. Curley, Clark 2, Leamy, H. Read, 
Jones, Rosa, Fletchers, Keator, Tarbell, Chapman 2, Westcott, 
Peix. Double play— Leamy and H. Read. Batters hit— W. Curley, 
Chapman. Passed ball— Tyler. Wild pitches— Keator 2. Time— 
Ih.SOm. Umpires— B. L. Baldwin, Williston, '90; E H. Lehnert, 
Aggie, '93. Scorer— Keith. 



Williston, 4; M. A. C, 1. 

The college team closed a most successful season, 
Saturday June 10, with a return game with Willis- 
ton. Unfortunately our final ended in defeat, 
although the team played a winning game, being 
beaten by the small score of 4-1. 

Aggie was unable to hit Keator, making but two 
hits, while on the other hand Curley was hit with 
ease, fourteen hits being made off his pitching. 
Williston was very poor in base running but put up 
a fine fielding game. Aggie made her only run in 
the first inning. W. Curley was given his base on 
balls, stole second, and through a sacrifice and an 
error, scored. The features of the game were the 
fielding of Leamy, an unassisted double-play by 
Read, and a foul one-handed catch by Tyler. The 
score : 



Barter, cf, 
Rosa, If, 
Fletcher, 2b, 
Tyler, c, 
Keator, p, 
Tarbell, 3b, 
Chapman, vf, 
Westcott, ss, 
Peix, lb. 



W. Curley, c, 
Sullivan, rf, 
W. Cui'ley, p, 
Clark, 2b, 
Leamy, 3b, 
Jones, If, 
Howard, cf , 
Read, lb, 
Burgess, ss, 



Total, 

Innings, 
M. A. C, 

Williston, 

Times at bat— Williston 37, Aggie 32. Earned runs— Williston 2, 
Aggie 1. Total bases— Williston 15, Aggie 3. Sacrifice hits— Tyler 
2, Sullivan 2, Tarbell. Stolen bases— Keator 2, Rosa, Barber, W. 
Curley. Two-base hits -Clark, Tyler. Fu-st base on balls— Fletch- 
er, Rosa 2, Westcott, W. Curley. First base on errors— Williston 2, 
Aggie 7. Struck out— Clark 2, Jones, Howard, Eead, Tyler, Peix 3, 
Chapman 2, Rosa, Tarbell. Batter hit— Tarbell. Double plays- 
Fletcher to Peix; Read (unassisted). Passed ball— W. Curley 
Wild Pitch— G. Curley. Time— lb. 45m. Umpires— Baldwin, Willis- 
ton; Lehnert, Aggie. Scorer— Keith. 



A B 


K 


IB 


TE 


S H 


P o 


A 


E 





1 


3 


3 





1 








3 


1 











2 








4 


1 


1 


1 





4 


3 


1 


5 





2 


3 


•2 


8 


o 





6 


1 


5 


5 





1 


S 





3 





1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


4 





1 


1 











I 


3 





1 


1 





3 


1 


2 


4 














7 





1 



37 



14 15 3 27 15 



lETBSHPO A 







3 


1 


1 


1 





9 


4 









4 











2 















4 














1 


13 









4 





1 


2 





3 





1 






4 














2 


3 









4 














1 












3 














1 





2 






3 














10 












3 

















1 









32 


I 


2 


3 


2 


27 


21 


3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




1 























0- 


1 


1 





1 





1 








e 


1- 


4 



206 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lumn!. 



M. A. C. ASSOCIATE ALUMNI MEETING. 

The annual business meeting of the Associate 
Alumni of this college was held at the lecture-room, 
Botanic Museum, at two o'clock this afternoon. 

ALUMNI DINNER. 

The annual alumni dinner, always one of the 
pleasantest features of commencement week, occur- 
red at 1 o'clock this afternoon. The occasion par- 
took of the nature of a lawn party, and was held on 
the lawn about the Botanic Museum. A large num- 
ber of the alumni were present. 

ALDMNI REGISTER. 

'73. — David P. Penhallow, Botanic Gardens, Bos- 
ton. 

'92.— George B. Willard, Waltham. 
. '91. — Arthur H. Sawyer, Cromwell, Conn. 

'86. — William A. Eaton, 75 Henry St., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

'75.— Harry P. Otis, Leeds. 

'87. — Fred H. Fowler, Boston. 

'71. — Emory A. Ellsworth, Holyoke. 

'80.— William C. Parker, Boston. 

'90. — Frank 0. Williams, Sunderland. 

'91. — Howard N. Legate, Boston. 

'92.— George R. Taylor, Greenfield. 

'92. — Henry M. Thomson, Amherst. 

'92. — James E. Deuel, Boston. 

'91. — Malcom A. Carpenter, Amherst. 

'89. — William M. Shepardson, Amherst. 

'82. — Dr. James B. Paige, Amherst. 

'72. — Prof. John W. Clark, Northampton. 

'73. — Seth S. Warner, Northampton. 

'82. — Herbert Myrick, Springfield. 

'73. — John B. Minor, New Britain, Conn. 

'82.— John A. Cutter, New York, N. Y. 

'88.— Samuel H. Field, North Hatfield. 

'92. — Robert H. Smith, Amherst. 

'75.— John A. Barrs, Bridgeport, Conn. 

'89. — James T. Hutchings, Philadelphia, Penn. 

'72.— Elliot D. Shaw, Holyoke. 

'73.— Dr. Albert T. Wakefield, Sheffield. 

'84. — Llewellyn Smith, Worcester. 

'88.— Robert B. Moore, Elizabeth, N. J. 

'81. — Charles L. Flint, Boston. 

'87.— Edward R. Flint, Boston. 



'75. — Joseph F. Barrett, Bridgeton, N. J. 

'75. — Rev. Henry Hague, Worcester. 

'82. — Morris B. Kingman, Amherst. 

'9i. — Frank L. Arnold, Amherst. 

'78. — Charles E. Lyman, Middlefield, Conn. 

'92. — Elliot Rogers, Boston. 

ATTENTION ! 

The only way by which one can keep thoroughly 
posted in regard to the alumni is by becoming a sub- 
scriber to Aggie Life and perusing the Alumni Col- 
umn. 

ALUMNI notes. 

'87. — Mr. Ansel W. Paine has entered the hard- 
ware business at 178 Portland St., Boston. 

'89. — A. W. Miles, formerly of Rutland, is now 
at the Lyman School, Westboro, as assistant. 

'90. — D. W. Dickinson spent a few days in town 
recently. 

'91. — E. P. Fleet visited the College last week. 

'92. — S. O. Fowle, ex-'92, has opened an office 
at C. O. Bigelow's livery stable, Wellesley, and will 
practice veterinary surgery. 

'92. — Among our visitors last week were F. H. 
Plumb, C. Hubbard, W. I Boynton. 



Schillare's 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIN STREET, 



NOHTHAmPTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



207 



Yes this ia our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 

Headpfters lor Stieiirs Supplies. 

"LaniDS anil LaiiiD Golds art Oars." 



WIZLIAMS' BLOCK, A-MBERST, MASS. 

AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY, FEED IJ SALE STABLE, 

T, L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMBEBST, MASS. 



J. A. RAWS 



DEALER IN 



WATCHES, GIiOCKS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

FINE BTiLTIDNERY. 

REPAIRING NEATLY ANO ROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



3, 0. P 



h 



-i 



alloi, 



.A-lS^KCEItST , 



2^-A.SS. 



H. D. HEMENWAY, 



DEALER EN 



Student Supplies, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, NOTE BOOKS, WHITE GLOVES, 

POCKET LENSES, STATIONERY, BOTANY 

PRESSES, CONFECTIONERY, 

ETC. 



= PRICES LOW.S 
31 NORTH COLLEGE. 




LOVELL DIAMOND. 

A High Grade 
Wheel for a lit- 
tle money. 

Solid Tire, $85. 
CustiionTire,$90. 
Pneumatic 
Tire, $115. 

Send for Catalogue. 

FOR &\Lt B\ 

I. C C3-i«KK;i?^E>, 

B02S: SSe, - - .A-JS/CHEI^ST, 3M.«^SS. 

^Sg=All correspondence will receive prompt attention .=©9. 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, ETC., ETC. 

FIRST CLASS GOODS. PRICES LOW. 

13 SOUTH colleige:. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

^Co-OperatiYQ Steam Laundry ^^^ 

and Carpet Renovating Estalilislinient. 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



208 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes ll Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Sheet Music, 



Music Books, 
Strings 

FOR the: violin, banjo, ouitar, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 

a.:m:h:bk.st. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Hazors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEU F 

AJIHERST, MASS. 



,.^ DENTISTS. 5. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CUTLMB'S BLOCK, AMHEBST, MASS. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PBTSICIAJfS' PRBSCBIPTIONS CARMFVILI^T 
COMPO VNDED, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 



6 PHCENJCS ROW. 



Order your CrO^Si here. 



WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODGETT & CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



For Suits and Fall Qvercnats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEST TO THE BANK. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
e A.. 'h/L. TO S F. :iVE. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WOE.K WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-offlce. 



FINE ITAL AND FAIEMCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, 63.00. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, $2.50 AND $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

O. G. COUCM & SON'S. 

FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseau, 

RAZORS HONED. 

Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Atnherttf Ma99, 






H 



H 



FMEBH Jiira FIIfE. 



DEUEL'S DRUG S 



Amiierst House Block, 



ORE, 

Amiierst, lass, 



:E=s3:-^::Ri>vd:.^cis'X'- 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, . - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Eifies. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, flrst door west 
o( Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 



1892. 



NEV/ SKY LIGHT. 
EINLARGBD OPERATING ROOM. 

CLASS~AND SOCIETY GROUPS A SPECIALTY, 

OF HIGHEST GRADE MADE TO ORDER. 



5. g. D1(?H1!^50(5, D. D. g. 

DENTAL. ROOMS. 
WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



^^■Etlier and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



J^T THE 



AMHERST GASH SHOE STQRE 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



A. GU 



4TA I LO R 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



SWEATERS, 

JERSEYS, 

SUPPORTERS, 



A FULL LINE OF AMHLETIC AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 



IWilitat^y Suits and Trimmings. 



assachusetts Aqricultural Colteae, 




'ff$>' 



A.:aciL:^'IOL&t^^i:9 ^^^Ol^^, 



L^^Vi2^, WilxAAA^ Ipy^ 



n 



m^ 







•MASS. 

Sept. 20, 1893. 



h 



i 



^^^^ 



es^ 



VOL. IV. 



NO. 1. 




• BRIMTERS,» 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We Avould inform the friends of tlie college, and the 
piil)lic generally, that we are prepared to supplj' 
FRUIT AND bllNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shruljs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



THE AIHERST 

FUiTUp jiND CAB 



C, H. S4NDERS0ti& CO., 



CASH DEALERS IN 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



DRJ^GIflG SCHOOli 

WILL RE-OPEN OCT. 2. 

Do not wait until spring term and then crowd 2 or 3 hours a week, 
but start in October and take your time. Receptions, to members of 
the. school only, last Wednesday of each month from S till 10-SO. 

Will ue at Pacific Ha LL(Cook's Blk) Wednesdays from 7-30 to 8 30, 



D 



rn 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS. MATTRESSES, PILLOWS. STU DY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 



CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



p]DWIN NELSON, 
Book.seller and 'Stationer, 

COLLEGE TEXT- BOOKS, NEW and SECOND HAND. 
No. 3, Post Omce Blocli, Amherst. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FIXE USE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ISTJIBBEIR C3-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



All Goods STRICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 



10 PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



S^Jtepairiug done tvliile yo\t tvait,.=^ff 

T, W. SLOAN, 

S yH<ENIX ROW. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 

Braetkal Elarrjber, 

STE/\A^ AND CAS FITTER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heating a Specialty. 




AMHERST, MASS., SEPTEMBER 20, 1893. No. 1 



VOL. IV. 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Asrricultural College. 



Terms $1.00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OF BDIIOItS : 

C. F. WALKER, '94, Etlitor-in-chlef. 

G. H. MERWIN, '94, Business Manager. 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

F. L. GREENE, '94, T. P. FOLEY, '9.5, 

E. O. BAGG, '9.5, C. B. LANE, '95, 

R. L. HAYWARD, '96. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communica. 
tions should be addi'essed AGGIE Life, .A-Mherst Mass. 



J=^ 



Is. 



Are the members of the incoming class aware of 
the existence of a college button? We should think 
not, judging from the small number wearing them. 
But this college has adopted a button, and every 
student should show his loyalty to M. A. C. by 
wearing the maroon and white. 



The actiou of the students in voting to present to 
the Library such of the reading-room periodicals as 
may be deemed advisable by the Association, will 
prove a great benefit to the college. These mao'- 
azines reflect faithfully some of the best thoughts of 
the greatest men of the time and are invaluable to 
the student as subject matter for the study of con- 
temporaneous history aud thought. The custom 
once firmly established, future classes will wonder 
that the papers in question should ever have been 
disposed of in any other way. 



As we turn from the pleasures of the long vaca- 
tion to again resume our college duties we are 
pleased to note that we are to be aided in our work 



by four new instructors. If "well begun is half 
done," then surely we are well launched on our 
year's course. The new professors will not only re- 
lieve the overworked teachers whom they are to as- 
sist, but will, by the force of their individuality, ex- 
ert an important influence upon the mental atmos- 
phere of the college. The Life takes pleasure in 
welcoming these gentlemen to our midst, and trusts 
that they will find that their lines have been cast in 
pleasant places. 



Since the establishment of Aggie Life three years 
ago the alumni have greatly contributed to its wel- 
fare both by their financial support and by sending 
us matter for publication. In return it has been our 
constant endeavor to make the paper what it ought 
to be, a true representative of the M. A. C, uphold- 
ing the interests of the ofHcers and students and 
particularly of the graduates of the college. At the 
commencement of the new year we mail a sample 
copy of the paper to all alumni who are not subscrib- 
ers, with an urgent invitation for them to send in 
their names at once. We trust all will show their 
loyalty to the college by giving us their hearty 
support. 



The Washington Irving Literary Society is the 
oldest organization existing in the M. A. C. For 
nearly twenty-five years the students in this college 
have found the society a source ol pleasure as well 
as of profit. Probably no alumnus will read this 
editorial who has not most vivid recollections of the 
good times he has had at the "W. I." On the pages 
of its record books are to be found names that have 
become famous, not only at the college but in the 
world of business. These men always look back 
with satisfaction to the time they devoted to the col- 
lege debating society. As we review the past his- 
tory of the society and note its prosperity in former 
times we cannot but feel a deep regret for the neglect 



AGGIE LIFE. 



which it has suffered during the past year or two. 
We sincerely hope that every man in college who 
can possibly give the W. I. L. S. his support during 
the present year will do so and thus bring it back to 
prosperity. 



For the first time in the history of the college 
elective studies have been allowed the students, and 
the present senior class is realizing the benefits of 
such a course. Life has made repeated efforts to 
have electives granted and the many times expressed 
desire "that we have electives next term," is accom- 
plished this term. Of course the various classes 
are working somewhat under disadvantages, but we 
can hardly expect that the system could be per- 
fected at once. Various plans were formulated only 
to be rejected owing to some slight defect. At the 
opening of the term a series of difficulties arose ow- 
ing to the selection of subjects by some of the men 
that conilicted as regards the hours of recitation. 
However, the present system seems to have been 
adjusted for the accommodation of all, and con- 
ducted in such a manner that we trust electives will 
be continued for all future students in the regular 
course. The members of the senior class should 
consider themselves fortunate in that this system of 
electives was introduced before their graduation. 
Although in its primary or experimental stages they 
can derive much from the present course the 
classes which are to follow will reap still greater 
advantages as the system reaches a higher state of 
perfection. 



Considerable feeling has been made manifest in 
connection with the now practically abandoned 
Freshman-Sophomore cane rush. It seems evident 
at present that neither of the two classes in question 
were in favor of the cane rush, but. in some way 
understood that the student body would support them 
in an attempt to re-introduce the custom. Acting 
under these impressions, the two classes entered 
into negotiations upon the matter. But soon a very 
decided feeling against the cane rush was manifested 
and the matter has now been practically abandoned. 
Both classes deserve much credit for the decided 
stand which they took. Neither can be accused of 
any unwillingness to engage in such a contest as 
proven by the promptness with which they took up 



the scheme when it was advocated. And it cer- 
tainly speaks well for "Aggie" that such is the 
character of the two lower classes that a re-estab- 
lishment of the barbarous cane rush is now impossible. 
The annual cane rush at Amherst College took 
place on Saturday last and it was a good object 
lesson to any one interested in the progress of our 
educational institutions to see fainting, exhausted 
men hurled headlong from out the mass of two hun- 
dred or more excited rushers. The violence and 
brutality shown at that contest were certainly no 
inducements to the re-establishment of this half- 
civilized custom at M. A. C. We extend therefore 
our congratulations to " '96 " and " '97 " who being 
placed each in a very peculiar position brought the 
matter to such a fortunate termination. 



^on-tributed. 



COLUMBIA. 

Along the horizon the blue lake lies 
Reflecting the hue of the summer skies, 
The breeze blows over its heaving breast. 
And lightly kisses each foam-capped crest, 
While hurrying steamers, from far and near, 
Land laughing throngs on the long, dark pier. 

A wondrous scene their eyes behold, 
A vision of beauty, a dream untold 
Of stately pillars and spacious halls. 
And statues crowning the massive walls. 
While the grand Republic, a golden guard, 
O'er the great white city keeps watch and ward. 

Here Art, with a wave of her magic wand, 
Makes the desert bloom in this we.stern land, 
Here science reigns with a sterner sway, 
And gloomiest night becomes brightest day. 
While laden with treasui'es of every hue 
The old world hastens to greet the new. 

At eventide when the still lagoon 
Reveals in its depths the full-orbed moon. 
The great dome glitters with countless stars 
And the search-light throws its brilliant bars 
On the spectral boatman, who steers his way, 
Half veiled by the fountain's foam and spray. 

From far and near come joyous notes 
And over the lake the music floats, 
While in flaming colors against the sky 
The flag of freedom is flung on high. 
And fiery letters to all proclaim 
The great commander's illustrious name. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



'Twas years ago that with map and chart 
In the convent he planned a hero's part, 
And with clumsy vessel and timid crew 
He conquered the sea, as heroes do ; 
He gave us the land of the free and brave 
Then rested in peace in an unknown grave. 

But Columbia lives, and the nations of earth 

Proclaim her glory and tell her worth. 

With marching thousands in bright array 

And martial music and banners gay, 

And the cheers that ascend by the blue lake's shore 

Shall ring round the world, forevermore. 



REPORT OF COLONEL HUGHES. 
The Inspector General, U. S. A., 
Washington, D. C. 

General : — I respectfully submit the following 
report of an inspection of the Military Department 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, which 
was completed last evening. 

The department is in charge of 1st. Lieut. Wal- 
ter M. Dickinson, 17th. Infantry, who relieved 1st. 
Lieut. Lester W. Cornish, 5th. Cavalry, last Sep- 
tember. This is Lieut. Dickinson's first experience 
in this field of work, and it is a pleasure to state 
that he has taken hold of his new duties with energy 
and purpose and the results are very gratifying. 

The organization continues just as he found it on 
his assuming charge ; a battalion of four companies, 
a cadet major, adjutant, quartermaster, fire marshal, 
sergeant-major, quarter-master sergeant and four 
companies officered as in onr normal Infantry organ- 
ization, all cadet officers being taken from the sen- 
ior class. 

The battalion at date numbers but one hundred 
and thirty-seven, but quite a percentage of the stu- 
dents have gone to the World's Fair. 

The report shows a very fair regularity of atten- 
dance at both practical and theoretical instruction 
during the year, but it has been reduced at times be- 
low the normal by sickness, measles having invaded 
the dormitory. 

The military professor is given the same rights 
and powers in the management of the affairs of his 
department that are given the professors in other 
departments of the institution. He is always as- 



sured of full support from the President and his fel- 
low members of the Faculty in any well considered 
and judicious actions lie may take. He is given 
three hours per week for practical work and one 
hour per week for theoretical instruction. 

The practical work has comprised a course of in- 
struction in rifle shooting, in broad sword drill and 
the Infantry drill regulations. The obsolete guns 
and mortars are no longer made use of because in- 
struction in the use of these pieces would be of no 
utility. Lieut. Dickinson is desirous of having a 
supply of Signal equipments and until modern breech 
loading field guns can be supplied there is abundant 

time for such a course of instructiou. 

* * * * ' » 

In concluding this report I desire to invite atten- 
tion to the fact that in going my rounds of these 
colleges there is much questioning as to the methods 
pursued elsewhere, and of the results. It is evi- 
dent that these young men would greatly profit by 
a free and general interchange of ideas and expe- 
riences, as much might be gained by a full knowl- 
edge of each other's failures as by their successes. 
In considering the matter I am thoroughly impressed 
with the idea that it would be for the interest of all 
concerned if the military professors of geographi- 
cal districts were combined at some central point 
once in two years for a general discussion of ways 
and means. 

This remark can best be made in my report up- 
on this college for the reason that I have already 
found the Military Department here in an exceed- 
ingly satisfactory condition and the necessity for 
such a council does not have special reference to it. 

The Presidents of these colleges meet once a year 
for conference. If the Military Departments were 
not specialities the interest of the department could 
be discussed and determined by them. But military 
matters are so far outside the college curriculum 
that they can only be satisfactorily discussed by 
specialists. 

Very respectfully, 

R. R. Hughes, Colonel, 

Inspector General. 
Brattleboro, Vt., June 17th, 1893. 



— The freshmen have challenged the sophomores 
to a game of foot-ball which will be played Nov. 1. 



AGGIE L,IFE. 



OUR NEW PROFESSORS. 

This college year witnesses tlie appointment of 
five assistant professors in the departments of 
Chemistry, Botany, Mathematics, English, and 
Agriculture. 

The first of these, E. R. Flint, M. A. C. '87, after 
graduating, accepted a position as assistant chemist 
at the State Experiment Station, remaining there 
three years. He resigned to enter the University of 
Gbttingen, from which he received the degree of 
Ph. D. in 1892. Returning to America he opened 
a chemist's office in Boston. He is to have charge 
of the classes in elementary chemistry. 

G. E. Stone, Ph. D., who relieves Professor 
Maynard of some of his classes in botany, entered 
the class of '86 in this college. At the end of his 
second year he left to enter the Mass. Institute of 
Technology. There he pursued a general course in 
biology paying especial attention to botany and 
from time to time engaging in bacteriological work 
for various public institutions. In the summer of 
1890 he had charge of the botany classes at the 
Worcester Summer School. The next year he 
entered Leipsic University taking his degree of Ph.D. 
in 1892. Returning to this country he pursued his 
studies in the Psychological Laboratory of Clark 
University until he received his present appointment. 

The Assistant Professor of Mathematics and 
Physics, Mr. A. C. Washburne took a four years' 
course in Civil and Mechanical Engineering at Pur- 
due University, leaving before the close of his senior 
year to enter West Point. After two years he left 
the Academy, accepting a position as Civil Engineer. 
Since then he has been engaged in teaching and has 
acquired a large experience in his profession. 
Among other places, Mr. Washburne has taught at 
the New York Military Academy at Cornwall-on- 
Hudson, the Cheltenhan Academy and the Ogontz 
School for Young Ladies, both at Ogontz, Pa., the 
St. John's School and the Ossining Seminary, both 
at Sing Sing, N. Y. 

Mr. II. Babson, A. B. Amherst '93, who is to 
assist Prof. Mills in his arduous duties in the Eng- 
lish department, fitted for college at the Gloucester 
High School and graduated from Amherst with 
honors. 

F. S. Cooley, M. A. C. '88, has been appointed 
Assistant Professor of Agriculture. After gradu- 



ating, he spent some time in teaching, which occu- 
pation he left to become Assistant Agriculturist of 
the Hatch Experiment Station, M. A. C. Later he 
became Superintendent of the farm at the college, 
which position he has held till the present time and 
will continue to occupy until April 1st. He will 
lecture to the students in the first year's course. 

^Sft* 

Y. M. C. A. TOPICS. 

Sept. 21— "The Best Bank of Deposit," Matt. 6 : 
19-21. B.K.Jones. 

Sept. 24— "Taste and See," Ps. 34:8-22. H. L. 
Frost. 

Sept. 28— "The Lord's Dav— How Shall it be 
Spent?" Matt. 12 : 9-13. F. C. Tobey. 

Oct. 1— "The Place of Perfect Security," Ps.91. 
E. A. White. 



BATTALION ORGANIZATION. 
Commandant — Lieut. W. M. Dickinson, 17th In- 
fantry, U. S. A. 

COMMISIONED STAFF. 

Cadet 1st Lieut, and Adjutant, H. P. Smead 

" " " Quartermaster, L. H. Bacon 

" " " Fire-Marshal, C. L. Brown 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Cadet Sergeant Major, E. H. Clark 

" Quartermaster Sergeant, T. P. Foley 

" Color Sergeant, H. B. Read 

" Color Corporal, G. A. Billings 

" Color Corporal, W. L. Bemis 

BAND. 



Cadet 1st Lieut, and Baud Leader, 
" Cadet Drum Major, 



J. H. Putnam 
P. E. Davis 



COMPANIES. 



Cadet Capt. G. H. Merwin, assigned to Co. A. 

" T. S. Bacon, " " " D. 

" " J. E. Gifford, " " " B. 

" A. C. Curtis, " " " C. 

Cadet 1st Lieut. A. H. Kirkland, assigned to Co 

" " L. Manley, " " 

" " S. F. Howard, " " 

" " R. E. Smith, " " 

" 2d Lieut. C. H. Spaulding, " " 

" " A. J. Morse, " " 

" " H. M. Fowler, " " 

" " E. T. Dickinson, " " 

" Isl Sergeant R. A. Cooley, " " 

" " F. L. Warren, " " 

" " H. S. Fairbanks, " " 



A. 
D. 
B. 
C. 
A. 
D. 
B. 
C. 
A. 
D. 
B. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



" H. A. Ballou 
Sergeant C. W. Crehore, 

M. J. Sullivan, 
" R. S. Jones, 
" J. Marsh, 
" W. L. Morse, 
" C. B. Lane, 
" W. A. Root, 
" H. L. Frost, 

Corporal S. P. Toole, 

F. C. Tobey, 

A. B. Smith, 
" S. Kuroda, 

H. E. Clark, 
" E. H. Henderson, 
" H. D. Hemenwav, 
" C. M. Dickinson', 
" E. A. White, 



C. 
B. 
B. 
A. 
A. 
D. 
D. 
C. 
C. 
A. 
C. 

c. 

B. 
D. 
B. 
A. 
B. 
D. 



Subscribe for Aggie Life. 



A new and important feature of the Life for 
Volume IV, is the cover. We trust that our 
readers will find the result of our efforts satisfac- 
tory. 



Two weeks of the new year have passed and the 
student has forgotten the pleasures of vacation in 
his desire to do his share of the routine college 
work. The senior has become accustomed to 
the dignity of his new position, and after solving 
the elective problem is beginning to think of the 
honors of class day^ — not far distant. The fresh- 
men and sophomores are still engaged in a friendly 
struggle for supremacy, while the juniors have the 
Index to occuppy their minds. Truly, the outlook 
is bright for a pleasant and prosperous year. 



It is pleasant to recordthat so many of our stu- 
dents were fortunate enough to visit the Exposi- 
tion this summer. To them, as to all open, intelli- 
gent minds, it has been, if not an education in it- 
self, at least an important factor in their attainment 
of knowledge. The study of the displays in all 
realms of Art, Science and Industry, made by all 
nations of the globe can but result in enlargement 
of the mental horizon and invigoration of the men 



tal faculties. And as the Chicago dust is shaken 
off the feet-( Would it were possible to get rid of it 
by any process so easy as shaking !)the student re- 
turns to his work, refreshed in miud if wearied in 
body, and filled with memories of the grand and 
beautiful which will be to him an inspiration for- 
ever. 

* 
w * 

A few days ago we heard a freshman enquire con- 
cerning the Natural History Society, and express a 
desire to join it. Now, although there was a time 
when the above named institution was very active in 
its operations and successful in accomplishing the 
results for which it was founded, during the past 
term the society has been suffering from a lack of 
interest among its members. However, with the 
large increase in the number of students in col. 
lege we can see no reason why there cannot be a 
revival at once. What better way can there be 
for those who are interested in science to 
make their sludies interesting and enjoyable to 
themselves than by banding together for the attain- 
ment of a common object? September, with its 
golden-rod is not quite gone, and October with its 
cold, clear air still lies before us — the best time in 
the whole year for long tramps over the mountains 
and through the woods, in quest of knowledge, keen 
enjoyment and good health. Let us shake the 
dust off the botany can, take down the insect net 
from the peg on the wall ; arming ourselves with a 
pocket note-book and take advantage of the oppor- 
tunities that lie before us. 



MASS MEETING. 



The annual mass meeting was held Sept. 8th. 
After accepting the minutes of the previous meeting 
the reports of the Secretaries of the various associa- 
tions were read and accepted. 

Voted that certain periodicals of the reading 
room selected at the discretion of the directors be 
placed in the library instead of being disposed of as 
is customary bj- auction sale. 

Voted to repeal the act by which the classes were 
to recommend a list of candidates previous to the 
election of Aggie Life editors. 

After several remarks of general interest the 
meeting was adjourned. 

A. J. Morse, Pres. 
Lowell Manley, Sec. 



AGGIE LIF 



5ched^ile. 




Fall 


Term. 




GENERAL 


EXERCISES. 


8-15 A 


. M. Chapel. 


10-30 A. M. Church, Sunday. 


8-30 i 


. M. Inspection rooms, S. 


3-lS P. M. Drill, M. Tu. Th. 




CLASS EXEECISBS. 




SENIOR. 


JUNIOR. 


8-30. 


Pol. Ecou. M. Tu, W.Th. 
Militai-y Science, F. 
Entomology, M.Tu.W.Th 


Agriculture, M.Tu.W.Th. 


9-30. 


Veterinary. 


Chemistry, M. Tu. W. 




Entomology, M.Tu.W.Th 


English, Th.F. 




Mathematics. 




10-30. 


Agriculture. 


Zoology, M. Tu. W. Th. 




Electricity. 


Chemistry, P. 




German. 




11-30. 


English, M. Tu. 


Zoology, M. Tu. W. Th. 




Chemistry, W. Th. F. 


Chemistry, F. 


1-00. 


Botany, M. Tu. W. Th. 
Chemistry, M.Tu.W.Th. 


Market Gardening, M. Tu. Th. 


2-00. 


Botany, M. Tu. W. Th. 
Chemistry, M.Tu.W.Th. 






SOPHOMORE. 


FRESHMAN. 


8-30. 


Trigonometry, M. Tu. F. 
English, W.Th. 


Botany. 


9.30. 


French, M. Tu. W. 


Algebra. 


10-30. 


Botany, M. Tu. W. Th. 


Tactics, M. 

Latin, Tu. W. Th. F. 


11-30. 


Agriculture, M.Tu.W.Th. 


Tactics, M. 
English, Tu. W. 


1-00. 


Chemistry, M.Tu.W.Th. 




2-00. 




Book-keeping, M. Tu. 




FIRST 


TEAR. 




S-SO. Botany. 






9-30. Agriculture, M. Tu. W. 




10-30. Tactics, 


M. 




11-30. English, 


W. Th. F. 




1-00. Algebra 


M. Tu. W. Th. 



— H. A. Ballou, '95, is monitor. 

— Rifle practice has been resumed. 

— D. C. Potter, '95, returned Sept. 16. 

— E. D. White, '94, rings the new bell, 

— Thirty minutes for refreshments now. 

— R. W. Drury, ex '95, is at West Point. 

— E. O. Bagg, ex-'95, will not return to college. 

— Repairs are being made in the basement of So. 
College. 

— Pres. Goodell teaches the senior division in 
G-erman. 

— J. S. Goodell, es-'95, will not return to college 
this fall. 



— T. F. Keith, '94, will return to college in a 
few days. 

— Prof. Maynard visited the Fair the latter part 
of August. 

— Prof. Warner teaches the freshman class in 
book-keeping. 

— There are a number of first-class privates in the 
battalion now. 

— Pres. Goodell spent a portion of his vacation 
at Block Island. 

— Prof. Wellington and Dr. J. B. Lindsey visited 
the Fair in August. 

— It is said that some fast runs have been made 
up on the hill lately. 

— F. L. Greene, '94, will correspond for the New 
York Tribune this year. 

— Work on the plans for the new system of sew- 
age has been commenced. 

— Prof. Mills visited the Fair in July attending 
the Congress of Education. 

— Dodge, Kinsman and Shurtleff, formerly of 
Ninety-six, have left college. 

— The century plant will be replaced by another 
specimen of the same species. 

— Vaughan and Walsh, formerly of Ninety-six, 
are members of Ninety-seven. 

— Alfred Glynn, of Amherst, has charge of the 
uniforming of the freshman class. 

—Topic cards for the Y. M. C. A. will be printed 
and distributed as soon as possible. 

— H. E. Clark, '95, is mail-carrier for the term, 
with F. H. Read, '96, as substitute. 

— Burgess, '95, Stevens, '95, and Hayward, '96, 
will return to college in a few weeks. 

— The battalion has been divided into four com- 
panies of about twenty-five privates each. 

— Next Sunday Rev. G. E. Fisher of North Am- 
herst is expected to occupy the college pulpit. 

— At an enthusiastic mass meeting yesterday 
over four hundred dollars was raised for foot-ball. 

— The man is lucky indeed who by chance or 
otherwise has secured lodgings in one of our college 
dormitories. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— Prof. Walker and family spent a portion of the 
vacation traveling in the west, visiting the exposi- 
tion in July- 

— The portion of the "Handbook of Amherst" 
which is devoted to the M. A. C. has been reprinted 
in pamphlet form. 

— W. J. Curley, ex-'96, has left college to enter 
Holy Cross. He will be missed in base-ball circles 
the coming season. 

— Dr. Curt Lehmann, Professor of Agriculture 
of the Royal Agricultural High School of Berlin 
visited the college Sept. 12. 

— Foot-ball practice is being carried on with great 
regularity. Capt. GifFord is showing energy in pre- 
paring for the season's work. 

— A new feature of the Y. M. C. A. Hand book 
is a map of the college grounds, the first, we believe, 
that has ever been published. 

— The World's Fair delegation has returned well 
satisfied and we believe none the worse for their 
long sojourn in the White City. 

— The Life board can testify to the excellence of 
Hemenway's confectionery. Call on him ; his sup- 
ply is always equal to the demand. 

— Political economy seems to be the favorite study 
with the seniors. The classes in agriculture, veter- 
inary and chemistry are also large. 

— An unusually large number of students were 
late in returning to college, many not arriving until 
several days after the term opened. 

— Wm. M. Shepardson and F. S. Cooley of the 
class of "88, and H. M. Thomson, '92, spent a 
portion of their vacations at Chicago and the fair. 

— Raymond Vuigner visited the college last Fri- 
day. He is a commissioner sent out by the French 
Government to inspect the scientific colleges of this 
conntry. 

— C. J. King, '97, of South Amherst, received 
the highest average in the competitive examination 
for admission to West Point, held at Springfield, 
last spring. 

— The senior English for the term will consist of 
exercises in debate and oratory. It will also in- 
clude a study of the works of some standard Amer- 
ican author. 



— A canvass is being made of the freshman class 
by the membership committee of the Y. M. C. A. 
with very favorable results. The membership of 
the association will soon be largely increased. 

— The whole number of students now connected 
with the college is 161, as follows: seniors, 33; 
juniors, 31 ; sophomores, 34 ; freshmen, 42 ; first 
year, 21. Seven men have not yet returned. 

— Twelve members of the garden committee of 
the Mass. Agricultural Society visited the college 
Sept. 13, and awarded the Horticultural department 
a prize of fifty dollars for the excellence of the 
vineyard . 

— The managers of the orchestra are anxious to 
reorganize at once, and to lay plans for the season's 
work. All players of bass or stringed instruments 
are requested to make themselves known to H. M. 
Fowler, '94. 

— Work on the foundations of the new buildings 
of the farm department is being rapidly carried on. 
The new structures will be the largest on the 
grounds and will greatly facilitate the agricultural 
operations of the college. 

— Members of the college will be pleased to learn 
of the complete recovery of Stockwell, '94, from Ms 
recent severe illness. He will not complete his 
course at college, but will remain for the present at 
his home in Sutton, Mass. 

— The college has purchased a collection of statu- 
ettes of domestic animals, similar to those on exhi- 
bition in the agricultural building at the World's 
Fair. The collection is manufactured by Max 
Landsburg, and cost one thousand dollars. 

— Sometime in August lightning struck the spire 
of the stone chapel, removing the gilding from the 
large pointers of all four of the clock faces. As it 
is impossible now to tell the time from a distaace 
we hope the damage will be repaired at once. 

— There is an interesting article in the September 
number of the New England Magazine, by A. B. 
Ward, entitled "An Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion." The article describes the work of the Hatch 
station of the M. A. C, and is illustrated by num- 
erous photographic views of the college grounds 
and buildings. Views of the interiors of the insect- 
ary and plant house, including the century plant as 
it appeared in full bloom, are of especial interest. 



8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— Carpenters have held possession of the old 
chapel for someiime and are slowly transforming 
that historic place into a chemical laboratory with 
all the modern equipments for quantitative analysis. 
The room will have accommodations for thirty 
students, and will be occupied by the senior division 
in chemistry. 

— The drill for the present will consist of the set- 
ting-up exercises for the freshmen under command 
of the officers of companies A and C, artillery squad 
drill for the sophomores under the officers of com- 
pany D, and infantry squad drill for the sophomores 
under the officers of Co. B. A detail will go to the 
target when the weather will permit. 

— The following students were registered at the 
Massachusetts Building, Jackson Park, during the 
months of July and August : '94, T. S. Bacen, Davis, 
F. L. Greene, S. F. Howard, Lewis, Merwin, Spauld- 
ing, Walker,E. D. White. '95,Ballou, Burgess, H.E. 
Clark, Cooley, CM. Dickinson, Frost, Kuroda, Lane, 
Root, A. B. Smith, White. '96, J. E. Green, 
Kramer, Rawson, F. H. Read, Shultis, Tsuda. '97, 
Mansfield, Leavens. 



THE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY. 

The above named society held its first meeting of 
this year in Prof. Brooks' recitation room last Mon- 
day evening. President Ira C. Green in his opening 
remarks made several suggestions as to the line of 
work to be followed this term. 

A trip to Sunderland cave will probably be the 
first field excursion and all members of the society 
and those who are not members but who can take 
the trip should not miss the opportunity to visit this 
well-known spot so interesting to the naturalist 

A series of lectures upon topics pertaining to nat- 
ural history will be commenced next month and con- 
tinued throughout the collegiate year. 

Several new members have been added to the 
society this term but at this time especially the 
attention of the Freshman class is called to this 
society in order that they may join at once so as to 
participate in the fall term work. 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS. 



REGULAR COURSE. 

Edward Bernard Alleu, Brimfleld, 
Harxy Francis Allen, Northboro, 
John "William Allen, Northboro, 



Mr. Dana's 

Mr. Shepardson's 



Herbert Julius Armstrong, Sunderland, Mrs. Baker's 
Frederick "White Barclay, Kent, Conn., 4 N. C. 

John Marshall Barry, Boston, Mrs. Clark's 

James Lowell Bartlett, Salisbury, Stockbridge House 
Alexander Cullen Birnie, Ludlow. 2 S. C, 

Thomas Herbert Charmbury, Amherst, Home 

Liberty Lyon Cheney, Soutlibridge, U U. C. 

Lafayette Franklin Clark, "W.Brattleboro, Vt., Mr. Dana's 
Frederick "William Colby, Eoxbury, 18 S. C. 

Robert Parker Colcmau, Richmond, 1 N. C. 

Maurice Elmer Cook, Shrewsbury, 6 N. C. 

George Albert Drew, Westport, 11 N. C. 

John Richmond Eddy, Boston, 7 N. C. 

John Albert Emrich, Amherst, 15 N. C. 

Robert Leroy Farusworth, Turners Falls, 22 N. C. 

Percy Fletcher Felch, Ayer, 8 N. C. 

Austin Hervey Fittz, Natick, 21 JT. C. 

Meltiah Tobey Gibbs, New Bedford, 11 S. C. 

Charles Ignatius Goessmann, Amherst, Home 

Herbert Frank Howe, No. Cambridge. 28 N. C. 

George Caleb Hubbard, Sunderland, Home 

Heriiert Coleman Hunter, So. Natick, 27 N. C. 

Charles Austin King, East Taunton, 31 N. C. 

Charles Jerome King, So. Amherst, Home 

George Davison Leavens, Pawtucket, R. I., Mrs. Clark's 
George Rogers Mansfield, Gloucester, Stockbridge House 
Frank Cowpeibhwait Millard, N. Egremont, Club House 



Charles Ayer Norton, Lynn, 
Allen March Nowell, "Winchester, 
Clayton Franklin Palmer, Stockbridge, 
Edward Dwight Palmer, Amherst, 
Charles Adams Peters, Greendale, 
Percy Colton Roberts, No. Amherst, 
Carleton Farrar Sherman, Boston, 
Philip Heury Smith, Jr., So. Hadley. 
Harold Everett Stearns, Couway, 
Robert Henry Vonghan, "Worcester, 
Tom Francis "Walsh, No. Amherst, 
Samuel William Wiley, Amherst, 

TWO YE.\ES" COURSE. 

George Henry Bailey, Middlcboro, 
Elisha Aaron Bagg, "West Springfield, 
Dan Ashley Beaman, Leverett, 
George Louis Burnham, Audover, 
Charles Wesley Delano, No. Duxbuiy, 
Arthur Edwin Diittou, Chelmsford, 
Williams Eaton, No. Middleboro, 
Albert Dunell Hall, West New con, 
Wil'iam Anson Hooker, Amherst, 
Louis Maynard Huutress, Amherst. 
Asa Howard Kimljall, Melrose Higlilant 
Frank Pitkin Lane, Oak Park, Hl.r 
Frank Linnaeus Nims, Amherst, 
Benjamin Willard Rice, Northboro, 
Albert Shepard Rising, Westfleld, 
Frank Eaton Sweetser, Danvers, 
Charles Ernest Tisdale, No, Amherst, 
Fred Alviu Tisdale, No. Amherst, 
Fred Gage Todd, Boxford, 
William Benjamin Wentzell, Amherst, 
Herbert Raymond Wolcott. Amherst, 



Mrs. 



2 S. C. 

Baker's 

IN. C. 

Home 

Club House 

Home 

Mrs. A. Baker's 

13 N. C. 

20 N. C. 

Miss Cowles' 

Home 

Home 



Mrs. A. Baker's 

Tower 

Home 

7N. C. 

4N. C. 

12 N. C. 

White's 

15 N. C. 

Home 

Home 

27 N. C. 

White's 

Home 

Mr. Shepardson's 

31 N. C. 

2N. C. 



Mrs. 



Mrs. 



Mrs, 



Home 
Home 
Cowles' 
Home 
Home 



— Amherst College opened Sept. 14. 

— The annual c-ane rush between the fresh- 
men and sophomores at Amherst College was held 
last Saturday evening, and was attended by the 
usual amount of excitement. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Owing to the nou-receipt of a communication 
from the secretary of the class of '93 we are unable 
to publish items concerning that class until our nest 
issue. 

'77. — Atherton Clark who has been for many 
years with the well known firm of R. H. Stearns & 
Co. of 140 Tremont St., Boston, has been admitted 
to partnership in that firm. 

'84. — Cards have been received announcing the 
marriage of A. W. Lublin, ex '84, to Mrs. Patter- 
son, New York City. 

'85. — Beoni Tekirian is chemist for the Y. T. 
Matzoon Co. which has an exhibit at the World's 
Fair. 

'86. — G. E. Stone, ex '86, who recently received 
the degree Ph. D. in the course of Physiological 
Botany, at the University of Leipsie, Germany has 
been appointed Assistant Professor of Botany at 
this college. 

'87. — E. R. Flint who received the degree Ph. D. 
in Chemistry at the University of Gottingen, Ger- 
many has accepted the position as Assistant Profes- 
sor at this college. 

'87.— F. S. Clark ex-'87, of Lowell was visiting 
friends here last week. 

'87 — J. C.Oslevhout has changed his place of bus- 
iness from Westfield to Carlisle, Mass. 

'89. — James T. Hutchings has entered upon his 
duties as Superintendent of the West End Electric 
Co., of Philadelphia, Pa. This is one of the larg- 
est power stations in the city. 

'89. — A. L. Miles was united in marriage to Bliss 
Marie A. Putnam Aug. lo and they will reside at 
Maple Cottage, Westboro, Mass. 

'89. — H. E. Woodbury, who for some time has 
been principal of the High School at Northborough 
has accepted a position as Professor of Horticult- 
ure at Storrs' Agricultural College in Connecticut. 

'89. — F. W. Davis, Editorial rooms, Boston 
Journal, was married to Miss Mabel A. Bennett, at 
St. John's Church, Portsmouth, N. H., yesterday. 

'92. — E. T. Clark has resigned his position at 
Coopersbury, Pa. and has accepted the position of 
superintendent of the farm of Hon. Levi P. Mor- 
ton, Rhinecliff, N. Y. 



'92.— W. B. Fletcher is now employed at Hill's 
drug store, Chelmsford. 

'92, — G. B. Willard of Charlestown spent a few 
days here last week. 

'94— C. H. Barton ex '94, of 388 Main St., Buf- 
falo, N. Y. visited old friends at college last week. 



BEADING BOOM ASSOCIATION. 

REPORT OP TREASURER. 

Dr. 

Received from former Treasurer, $1.48 

sale of periodicals, 65.50 

taxes, 172.79 

$229.77 

Or. 

Paid for Periodicals, $122.02 
Carrying maii June '92 to Sept. '93, 68.50 

Lighting the Reading room, 4.91 

P. O. boxes,July 1, '92 to Sept. 30, '93, 6.89 

Repairs in Reading room, 4.13 

Rochester Lamp, 5.00 

Stools, 7.80 

Sundries, 6.17 



Amt. on hand, Sept. 8, '93, 



-$225.42 
4.35 

$229.77 



Respectfully submitted, 

A. C. Curtis, Treasurer. 
gifr. 

M. A. C. ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Beceived. 
Sept. 12, 1892, on hand, $4.70 

Reed from Pres. Goodell, 10.00 

Library dues, 16.00 

breakage, .50 

alumni, 68.00 

A. G. Eames, 4.00 

Republican club, 10.58 

taxes from students, 64.50 

$181.95 

Paid. 
Screens for electric lights, 4.50 

New apparatus and repair of old, 137.83 

Postage, stationery, keys, book of rules, &c. 3.70 
Express and freight, 2.75 

M. A. C. A. A. banner, 18.00 

Expenses of Field Day, 9.75 

$176.53 

Balance on hand, Sept. 8, '93, 5.42 



Respectfully submitted, 

L. Matstley, Treasurer. 



$181.95 



10 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE Y. M. C. A. RECEPTION. 

On the eveoing of Friday, Sept. 8, was held the 
annual Y. M. C. A. reception to the Freshman class, 
at the home of Professor and Mrs. Brooks. The 
large attendance of both the faculty and students 
contributed much to the success of the event. As 
this is one of the few opportunities which the stu- 
dents have {'or meeting so many connected with the 
college, the time was quickly and pleasantly passed 
in conversation and introducing the new men. The 
president and other officers of the Y. M. C. A. are 
to be congratulated on the result of their efforts. 
The thanks of all concerned are especially due to 
Professor and Mrs. Brooks who did so much to 
insure the success of the occasion. 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY. 

CLASS OFFICERS. 

Ninety -Fotir: President, A.J.Morse; vice-president, G.H.Merwin 
secretary, L. Mauley; captain, E. L. Boardraan; treasurer, C. H. 
Spaulding; historian, A. C. Curtis; sergeaut-at-arms, T. S. Bacon; 
foot-ball captain, H. J. Fo\¥ler. 

Ninety-Five: President, Jasper Marsh; vice-president, H. D. 
Heraeuway ; secretary and treasurer, C. W. Crehore; captain, H.B. 
Read; foot-ball captain, W.C.Brown; base-ball captain, E. H. 
Clark; historian, C. B. Lane. 

Ninety-Six: President, H. W. Rawson; vice-president, H. H. 
Roper; secretary, C. A. Nutting; treasurer, A.Day ; historian, F.L. 
Clapp; sergeant-at-arms, A.M.Kramer; foot-ball, H.C.Burrington; 
captain, P. A. Leamy. 

Ninety-Seven: President, C. I. Goessmann; vice-president, A. C. 
Birnie; secretary and treasurer, F. W. Col]>y; captain, J.M.Barry; 
foot-ball captain, E. D. Palmer; rope-puU captain, E. A. Bagg. 
COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS. 

T.M.C.A.: President, G. H. Merwin; vice-president, A. J. 
Morse; corresponding secretary, R. A. Cooley; recording secretary 
B. K. fJoues; treasurer, H. L. Frost; membership committee, chair- 
man, E. H. Alderman. 



The President will be at his office at the library from 
2 to 4 every afternoon except Saturday and Sunday. 

The treasurer will be at his ofilce at the Botanic 
Museum from 4 to .5-30 p. m. on Wednesdays and on Sat- 
urdays from 3 to 5-30 P. M. 

The college library will be open for the drawing of 
books from 2 to 4 p. M. and from 0-30 to 8 p. M. every 
day in the week except Saturday and Sunday; on Satur- 
day from 8 A. M. to 12 m., from 1 to 4 p. m. and from 6-30 
to 8 p. M. ; on Sunday from 12 M. to 3 p. M, for reference 
only. 

Amherst College library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 p. M. and from 6-30 to 0-30 p. m. except on Sundays and 
the holidays. M. A. C. students may receive the privi- 
lege of using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

The Zoological Museum will be open to visitors from 1 
to 3 p. M. every day but Saturday and Sunday. 

Mails leave the college at 1 p. m. and at 7-40 p. m. 
week-days and at 7-40 p. m. on Sundays. 



s 



Photographic Studio. 



SOCIETY, CLASS AND GROUP 
WORK A SPECIAL TV. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SGHILLARE, 



lOS MAIN STREET, - NOBTMAMPTON, MASS. 



LIA^ERY STABLE. 

SINGLE TEAMS TO LET AT FAIR PRICES. 
Pleasant St., Amherst. 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 



pefiefs m siie! 

" Lamps aod Lamp Goods m Oors." 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AWMEBST, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



II 



OVER 100 prs. WHITE GLOVES, ALL SIZES, A LARGE STOCK OF NOTE-BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 
BOTANY PRESSES, AND A NEW STOCK OF LENSES; 

Choice Chocolate Drops, Oxfords and Cocoanut Drops, Tiitti-Frnitti and Pepsin Gum, 

All fresh from the factory. 
FOUNTAIN PENS, VARIOUS KINDS AND PRICES. 

iReamesrimtoei' I ^^'-ill not b^ tia3.icS.eiri® old. 

One Hanging Lamp, Carpet, Rocking Chair, Rugs. 
°Honest Goods. I^Trices Low. SPp°Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



mr 



f>^/ j?m ^ J 



Sr NORTH COLLEGE. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



LIYERY. 



I 



T, L PAIGE, Prop'R 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

A.MMERST, MASS. 



J. A» RAWS 



DEALER IN 



? 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

PIHE STSTIOMERY. 
REPA1R1N6 NEATLY AND PROIMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



H. 0, PEfigE 




.A-IS^SSEItSa?, 



3V!:.i^£3S. 




A High Grade 
Wheel for a lit- 
tle money. 

Solid Tire, $85. 
CusliioiiTire,$90. 
Pneofiiatic 
Tire, $115. 

(r-nrSl^S*" Send for„Catalogue. 

FOR SALE El 

B03i; 386, - - .A^IIS^HBIiST, l^A-SS. 

.eE^AU correspondence will receive prompt atteation.=S^ 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

STUDENTS' 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, CHOICE CONFECTION- 
ERY, LUNCH CRACKERS, &c. 

FIRST CLASS OOODS. PRICES lOW. 



13 SOUTH COLLEOE. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 






and Carpet Renovatii Esiablislimeot. 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



12 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LAKGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes 4 Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 

-^}viXjXjZa.i^s' block:. 



Sheet Music, 



Miasic Books, 



Strings 

FOR "the: violin, banjo, ouitar, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 



.^^3^X^S:E^S'T SSO'CrSE 



ressmg 

Kazors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 



DENTISTS. «, 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
E. N. BEOWN, D. D. S. 

CXTTZEIt'S BLOCK, AMMEUST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
S A.. TsfL. TO 5 F. li/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PHTSICIAJrS' PnBSCRiyTIONS CAItEFJJI.ljT 
COMPOVSOEH, 

M0RGAN'S~P'HARMACY, 

6 PHCENIi ROW. 

Order your @@^^ here. 



WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



Yuv Suits a: 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



FIME lETAL M FAIENCE UiPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 and $2.50. 
For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 



FRANK C. PLUMB, 

ooms. 



COOK'S BLOCK, AMHEEST, MASS. 



Jeweler, Opticia n, latchMker. 

"XT" 

FINE GOODS. LOW PRICES. 

GOOD WORK WARRAHTED! 

First Door from Post-ofBce. 



Joseph Parisbaij, 
hair bhessimg rooms. 

RAZORS HONED. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWAED A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

o 
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherat, Mass, 



h 



milsM fi]^TI0LEg, 



A FINE LIKE OF 



SarOKING TOBACCO, PIPES, &c., 
CIGARS AND CIGARETTES. 



D 



S DRUG STOR 



Amlierst House Block, 



Amtierst Mi 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCT AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, flrst door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 



•GO TO - 



1893. 



LOfELL'8 PHOTflGRAPHIC STODIfl 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Glass and Group lOork a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 

SALE. 



?. g. DICTC^gOi^, D. D. g. 

DENXAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



^^"•Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T THE 



AMHERST CASH SHQEl STQRE 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 

A. GLYNN, 



/ 



4TA 1 LQR. ^ 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



flftassacbusetts Hgricultural CoUcqc 

1. A TIXTO ITEikRS' COURSE m Agriculture and kindred sciences. 

2. A FOUR ITEARE' ۩URSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. Eleven 
courses of study are provided Senior year, nine of which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, 
Chemistrj', Entomology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in the higher branches 
of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electrity, Political Science or German lay a thorough 
foundation for further study. English and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST CIRABUATE COURSE of two years leading to the degree of Master 
of Science. Residence at the college not required. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the President. 



C Oi. J^...-/^ 



n 




C^'W 



Oet. 4, 1893. 






'hx 



—— ' 






>4xr— =^<p^^t:;iQl-; 



^-^>^ 



VOL. IV. 



NO. 2. 




• PRINTERS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We would iuform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply in lim- 
ited quantities, 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address. 

Prof. S, T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS. 




D 



rn 



THE AlERST 

E >ND CAR 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 
BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, STUDY 



DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS. RUGS, ETC., ETC. 

All Croods STRICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 



S.A."VE 3S/C03SrE"2- B^S" G-OIISTCS- TO 

C. H, SANDERSON & CO,, 

FOR 

Sis, Ulsters, SiatBR, Hats, Caps, Gte 

AND MITTENS. 

Suits made to order, - .f 13 to .§35. 
Trousers made to order, 3 to 10. 
Overcoats made to order, 10 to 3.5. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



:SL. F'K'TITr'JS 



DflflOIflG SCHOOLi 

WILL RE-OPEN OCT. 3. 

Do not wait until spring term and then crowd 2 or 3 hours a week, 
but start in October and take your time. Receptions, to members of 
the school only, last Wediiesda'y of each month from 8 till 10-30. 

Will he at Pacific HALL(Cook's Blk) Wednesdays from 7-30 to 8 30. 



EDWIN NELSON, 
bookseller and Stationer, 

COLLEGE TEXT-BOOKS, HEW AND SECOND HAND. 
No. 3, Post Office Block, Amherst. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVKBYBODT. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

^STJBBEIR O-OOIDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



^^Sejyniring done, while you wait,,^jSr 

T, W. SLOAN, 

S yHCENlX MOW. 

5. A. PHILLIPS, 

Eraetkal Elaniber, 

STEAA\ AND CAS FITTER. 



A Large Stock of Eanges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heatius a .Specialty. 




VOL. IV. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBER 4, 1893. 



No. 2 



Publislied Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-clasa mail matter. 



BOARD OF MDITORS: 

C. F. WALKER, '94, Eilitor-in-chief . 

G. H. MEEWIN, '94, Business Manager. 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

F. L. GREENE, '94, T. P. FOLEY, '95, 

E. O. BAGG, '95, C. B. LANE, '95, 

E.L. HAYWARD, '96. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communica- 
tions should be addressed AGGIE Life, Amherst Mass. 



is. 



Where are the alumni? We presume that they 
still exist, but we would like some positive proof of 
the fact. The columns of the Life are always open 
to communications from former students of the 
college. We hope that all who can possibly do so 
will send us something for publication during the 
present year. Personal items for the alumni column 
are especially desired. 



The enthusiasm manifested at the mass meeting 
held Sept. 19 for the purpose of raising funds for 
the season's foot-ball campaign was very gratifying 
to the management. The liberal response to the 
request for financial support will relieve the team of 
one disadvantage which has been but too frequently 
the greatest obstacle to successful foot-ball playing. 
The team, encouraged by the hearty support of the 
students, is working hard and will undoubtedly 
make a good record for themselves and the college. 



The renewal of the rumor that South College is to 
be lighted by electricity brings forcibly to our minds 



the increasing need of such an arrangement, not 
only in the south but in both dormitories. That the 
present method is a nuisance and a constant source 
of danger will be readily acknowledged and the 
advantages of electricity as a means of lighting are 
too many to need explanation. While the first cost 
of introducing the system will probably be quite 
heavy, it should not deter those having authority in 
the matter from adopting the scheme. 



A FEW words in regard to the financial support of 
the Life may not be entirely out of place in these 
columns. Our main sources of support are alumni, 
students and advertisers. Students and advertisers 
are where we can reach them, but the alumni are 
scattered far and wide, and either from oversight or 
some other reason best known only to themselves, 
their subscriptions are not always forthcoming. Our 
terms are " one dollar per year, in advance," but a 
number have even neglected to make payment for 
last year's subscription. Alumnus, are you one of 
these? As we wish to do business in a business- 
like manner, and on business principles, is it any 
more than right to ask every subscriber who has not 
already done so, to settle his account with us at 
once? Our success depends upon you. Will you 
do your part? 



The outlook regarding musical matters for the 
present college year appears to be very promising. 
Although the graduating class included prominent 
members from the several organizations their places 
are being filled as rapidly as possible. The orches- 
tra was deprived of but two members and with the 
present increase of musical talent from the incoming 
classes these vacancies can be filled. The band also 
lost but few members, and this loss has been 
counterbalanced by the addition of several new 
members. A visit to the Drill Hall during practice 



14 



AGGIE LIFE. 



hours shows a great improvement since the begin- 
ning of the term and is sufficient to warrant excel- 
lent music for next spring terin when parades and 
reviews will be daily features. The glee club suf- 
fered the greatest loss of any organization. How- 
ever, the selection of new members has been com- 
pleted, the instructor of last year re-engaged, and 
the club is now preparing for the concert season. It 
is perhaps somewhat early to definitely outline what 
each shall accomplish, but we trust that the standard 
of musical excellence will be higher than that ever 
attained in former years. 



The rope-pull is over at last. After considerable 
misunderstanding and disagreement the two 
teams lined up and the matter was quickly and 
permanently decided. And now let us hope that the 
defeated classes will bear the defeat manfully and 
not attempt to regain by unfair means what was 
fairly and squarely won. Let us hope that the 
pieces of rope may hang undisturbed in the rooms 
of the successful Sophomores as mementoes of their 
victory and as reminders to the Freshmen of 
triumphs yet to come. The decision of the Sopho- 
moric authorities in allowing the two-years' men 
places on the rope is an important one and will be 
cited as a precedent in the other coming athletic 
contests. This question occupies a prominent place 
in our athletic circles and many good arguments can 
be advanced on both sides, but it certainly was a 
generous and gentlemanly thing ou the part of the 
Sophomores to allow the two-years' men, who 
otherwise, on account of lack of numbers, would be 
unable to participate in class contests of this kind, 
to take part in the event of last Friday. 



The controversy regarding the relation of the first 
year men to the Freshman class and to the college 
oro-anizations has thus far reached no definite settle- 
ment. While the general opinion has prevailed 
from the first that the matter should be brought at 
some convenient time before a college mass meeting 
and acted upon, the events of last Friday afternoon 
emphasized very decidedly the necessity of an 
immediate decision. Until this step is taken there 
can be no regular contest between the Freshman and 
Sophomore classes. Upon the decision also rests 
the election of association oflficers by the Freshman 



class, the contest for the Freshman and Sophomore 
rhetorical prizes, and the competition for positions 
on the editorial board of Aggie Life. The facts of 
the case, as near as we can state them, are these : 
The students of both the four years' course and the 
short course, immediately after the term commenced 
organized together as one class, and elected tempo- 
rary officers to serve for one month. Since that 
time they have maintained the same organization 
and continued to act as one body, notwithstanding 
the fact that the Faculty has voted to consider 
them as two distinct bodies in so far as the depart- 
ments of administration and instruction are con- 
cerned. This action of the Faculty, while showing 
very plainly the opinion of that body, does cot of 
course settle the question as to whether or not the 
two classes shall maintain independent organizations 
This is a matter that must be settled by the student 
body itself. While it must be admitted that during 
the first year, and especially during the first term, 
the interests of the two classes are in a great measure 
the same, even though they are pursuing a different 
course of studj', the second year will find the 
situation changed. Students who are nearing the 
end of their college course cannot be wholly in sym- 
pathy with those who are in the midst of it. This 
and many other ai'guments have been used to show 
that the two classes should dissolve partnership at 
once, while at the same time othei-s have claimed 
that the classes should be considered as one in 
justice to the first year men, who would otherwise 
be unable to participate to any extent in class con- 
tests. As a compromise it has also been proposed 
that the classes remain together for this year with 
the understanding that at the commencement of ne.xt 
year the present first-year class and all others who 
shall enter the short course then or in years to come 
shall maintain separate organizations. At the same 
time it would be necessary to provide for the represen- 
tation of the new classes in the college associations. 
We hope that the matter will be decided at once. 



Pres. Andrews in his annual address at the open- 
ing of Brown University spoke of the tendencies of 
Modern Science in regard to Men's Religious Con- 
ceptions and Convictions. A report of the discourse 
can be found in the Brown Daily Herald for Sept. 
21. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



IS 



FOOT-BALL. 
Mt. Heemon, 26 ; M. A. C, 0. 

The foot-ball season was opened at Aggie, Mon- 
day, Sept. 25, with the Mt Hermon team as oppo- 
nents. The visitors in a one-sided and somewhat 
listless game won from Aggie by the score of 26-0. 
The college team could do practically nothing with 
their heavier opponents, always gaining the ball 
only to lose it immediately on four downs or a punt. 
Very little enthusiasm or team work was shown, the 
Aggie ends alone playing a good steady game. 
Hermon found no trouble in breaking the Aggie 
line, nearly all their gains being accomplished by 
their heavy line kicking. Mt. Hermon started the 
game with the ball, but it was soon lost, only to be 
immediately regained on four downs, then with little 
effort Young scored the first touchdown and Fulton 
cut the goal posts. Aggie started with a flying V, 
gained several yards, and was forced to punt. The 
Hermonites made a touchdown, and in the following 
scrimmage, near the 25 yard line, Crowell landed 
upon the ball and by a beautiful sprint scored the 
second touchdown from which a goal was kicked. 
But few moments elapsed when Morrell scored Her- 
mon's third touchdown. Score, 18-0. 

Aggie started the second half with a rush but 
was unable to make much advance. Toole was 
compelled to punt and Morrell quickly made a 
touchdown. Fulton failed in his try for a goal. 
Aggie again took the hall, keeping it long enough 
to lose on four downs. Fulton with usual ease 
scored the last touchdown, but failed at a goal. At 
the last minute of the game Aggie waked up and 
made her only brilliant gain, Gifford dashing around 
the end for 30 yards, the last play of the game. The 
ball during nearly all the game was upon Aggie 
territory ; while the Hermon goal was not sighted at 
a point nearer than eight yards. 

For Aggie, Manley at left end and Higgins at left 
tackle did the best work. The Hermonites all 
played well. Fulton, Young and Morrell doing the 
brunt of the good playing. 

The teams lined up as follows : 

MT. HERMON. POSITION. M. A. C 

Crowell, left end, rigM, Marsli 

Cornell, left tackle, right, I. C. Greene 



Chez, 




left guard, right 


Latz, 




centre. 


Stone, 




right guard, left 


Camp, 




right tackle, left 


Johuson 


, 


right end, left. 


Hall, 




quarter-back, 


Fnlton, 
Morrell, 


} 


half-backs, 


YOUQg, 




full-back. 



Burriugton 

R. E. Smith 

Boardman 

Higgins 

Mauley 

Putnam 

f Gifford 

\ Palmer 

Toole 

Referee, F. N. Seerley, Springfield. Umpire, H. H. Bux- 
ton, Mt. Hermon. Touchdowus — Morrell 2, Young, Ful- 
ton 3. Time, 1 hour. 

W. P. I., 16; M. A. C, 0- 

The second game of the season was played with 
the Worcester Polytechnic Institute at Worcester 
last Saturday, and resulted in a defeat for Aggie. 

Aggie has the ball at the start and gains 10 
yards. By short rushes and runs by Gifford and 
Warren the ball is advanced to Tech's 20-yard line 
where a fumble gives Tech. the ball. Tech. gains 
10 yards by playing through centre but soon loses 
the ball on a fumble. Aggie gains 15 yards and 
again loses the ball on a fumble. 

This time Tech. works slowly up the field until 
they reach Aggie's 5-yard line. Here they stop 
being unable to push the ball over the line on 
account of strong resistance by Aggie. Aggie now 
makes a few short gains but soon loses the ball on 
four downs. Tech is forced to punt, Toole gets the 
ball and gains 7 yards ; Aggie gains slowly but can- 
not reach the goal line before time is called. Thus 
the first half ends with the ball on Tech's 40 yards 
line. Score, 0-0. 

The second half begins by Tech. gaining 6 yards 
with the wedge. By fast plaj'ing and a long run by 
Allen the ball is forced to Aggie's 5 yard line, from 
here Arnold takes the ball and scores a touchdown. 
Allen kicks a goal. Score, Tech. 6-Aggie 0. 

Aggie now carries the bull near the Tech. goal 
but loses on four downs. Tech. works down the 
field by playing through centre until they reach 
Aggie's 40 yard line, from here by good interference 
Allen makes a long run and scores a touchdown. 
Allen kicks goal. Score, Tech. 12-.4ggie 0. 

Aggie gains 10 yards and by successive rushes 
carries the ball to Tech's 35 yard line but soon loses 
it. Tech. now works hard and by short rushes and 
a run by Zaeder forces the ball to Aggie's 25 yard 
line. Allen runs around the end and scores another 



i6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



touchdown, but fails on try for goal. Score, Tech. 
16-Aggie 0. 

The remaining time is spent by play in the centre 
of the field neither side gaining much ground. 
Final score. Tech. 16-Aggie 0. 

The features of the game was the work of Mar- 
shall, Warren and Manley for Aggie, while Alien 
and Arnold excelled for Tech. The blocking of 
Aggie is worthy of mention, a great improvement 
being made on the previous game. 

Arnold substitutes for Nelson, Lathrop for Chase 
and Palmer for Toole. 

The teams lined up as follows : 

TECH. AGGIE. 

Ware, left end, right, Manley 

Brooks, capt., left tackle, right, Higgins 

Brigham, left guard, right, Boardman 

Boyden, centre. Smith 

Burdick, right guard, left, Bnrrington 

Durand, right tackle, left, Fairbanks 

Harris, right end, left, Warren 

Chase, (Lathrop) qiiarter-lmck, Putnam 

^"«°' \ half-back, \^T\^^^ . 

Zaeder, J ' (, Gilford, capt. 

Nelson, (Arnold) full-back, Toole (Palmer) 

Touchdowns, Allen 2, Arnold. Goals attempted, Allen 1. 
Referee, A. Rice, Worcester. Umpire, E. C. Howard, 

M. A. C, '93. Time of game, 1 hour. 



SCIENTIFIC WOEK IN THE SENIOR 
COURSE. 

Thinking that our readers might be interested in 
knowing something of the work tluit is to be done 
in the new courses that are offered to the seniors 
the following has been prepared as embodying the 
main features that are to be introduced in the re- 
spective departments. 

The work in botany will at first consist of the 
study of types of the cryptogamie orders, beginning 
with the lowest forms, slime-moulds, bacteria, etc., 
and coming up to the mosses and ferns. Later, 
vegetable histology will receive attention, all differ- 
ent plant tissues being carefully examined in con- 
nection with work in micro-chemistry. 

The time devoted to chemistry is divided between 
lectures by Dr. Goessmann and laboratory work. 
The former will be substantially the same as hither- 
to, namely : lectures on fertilizers and organic 
chemistry. 

The laboratory work will embrace qualitative in- 
organic analysis ; determination of weights, meas- 



ures and densities ; gravometric and volumetric 
analysis ; ultimate and proximate organic analysis ; 
special processes for the examination of air, water, 
fertilizers, fodders, foods, blood, milk, fats, etc. ; 
official analysis of fertilizers and fodders ; gas 
analysis, polarization and a review of chemical 
physics. This is however given as an outline only 
of possible work as it is not probable that the whole 
ground can be covered in the available time. 

The course in entomology will consist of lectures 
and laboratory work. The lectures will treat of the 
anatomy, embryology, transformations, colors, 
longevity, parasiticism, mimicry, dimorphism, de- 
formities, number, geographical and geological dis- 
tribution and phyllogeny of insects. It is also 
probable that economic entomology with stuuies on 
the insects of the green-house, orchard, garden, 
field and forest ; bee-keeping and insecticides will 
be included. The laboratory work will include dis- 
section of a larva, nymph and imago, with studies 
on the external anatomy and determination of in- 
sects of the different orders. A thesis based on 
original work in the study and description of an 
insect will be required. This course is especially 
designed to fit men for station work and similar 
lives. 

The students choosing electricity will spend their 
time on the elementary problems of electrical meas- 
urement and practical work with electrical instru- 
ments. Ayrton's First Yea7- in Electrical Engi- 
neering will be used as ^ test-book. 

The course in mathematics will include analytical 
geometry, differential and possibly integral calculus. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE. 
The following is the schedule of games as arranged 
by Manager Manley : 
Sept. 25, Mt. Hermon. Amherst. 

" 30, Worcester Tech. Worcester. 

Oct. 4, Amherst College. Pratt Field. 

" 7, Greenfield Athletic Club. Amherst. 
" 11, Amherst College. M. A. C. Campus. 

" 13, Wesleyan University. Middletown. 
" 18, Williston. Easthampton. 

Nov. 4, Williston. Amherst. 



Oxford consists of 22 colleges and has 12,000 
students, including graduates and undergraduates. 
—Ex. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



17 



NOTICE. 
Attention is called to the fact that there is a va- 
cancy on the board of Life editors occasioned b\' 
the resignation of Mr. Bagg. The election of a 
new man for the place will be held at 7 p. m. October 
16. Until that time competition for the position is 
invited. We expect that all members of the Juuior 
class who are interested in the welfare of the col- 
lege paper will submit one or more articles for pub- 
lication before the above date. All material sub- 
mitted will be taiien into consideration in the elec- 
tion whether published or not. — [Ed. 



A TRIP TO SUNDERLAND GAVE. 

The first "field-excursion" under the management 
of the N. H. S. was held Sept. 23 and included a 
trip to the above named cave and to other points of 
interest near it. For those who could not accom- 
pany the party a short description of the cave may 
be of interest. It is situated on the northern side 
of Mt. Toby and the lower c»pening is about eighty 
or ninety feet from the foot of the mountain. 
Another opening is situated considerablj- above the 
first and is on a level spot rather than a slope. 

Entering the cave one may progress about twenty 
feet when the passage suddenly terminates in a per- 
pendicular surface of rock extending downward for 
seven feet, an obstacle which, however, may be 
easily overcome. The passage to the upper open- 
ing from this spot is up a slight ascent. This con- 
stitutes the main gallery and varies in width from 
seven to ten feet. Leading from this gallery are 
several smaller passages but these extend for 
only a short distance, and are too low to afford 
standing room, it being necessary for the explorer 
to progress on his hands and knees. In one place 
is an opening extending to the upper surface fully 
fifty feet above the bottom of the cave. 

After leaving the cave the party explored a deep 
gully, generally known as "The Devil's Ditch,'' 
which was somewhat to the west of the cave. The 
next point attained was the summit of Mt. Sugar- 
loaf where a magnificent view of the Valley of the 
Connecticut and the Holyoke range to the south 
was obtained. From this point the party started 
for college having visited a 'rather obscure and yet 
one of the most interesting of the natural features 
of this section. H. L. F. 



ote| and ^ommen-ts. 



Every student in college is expected to subscribe 
for Aggie Life. If tliore are any who cannot take 
the paper they are requested to notify us at once. 
We trust no name will be missing from our subscrip- 
tion list. 

» 

An impromptu debate was held on the campus 
Friday afternoon. Althougli the exercises were not 
conducted according to the rules laid down in 
Genung's Rhetoric, there is no disputing the fact that 
the s()cakers were many, and that all of them were 
earnest and eloquent. The merits of the question 
were hardly decided — but the Sophomores got the 
rope and the Freshmen and first year men paid for it. 

« * 

Members of the .Junior class are arranging for an 

excursion to Boston and vicinity. Those who in 

the past have been fortunate enough to participate 

in one oC these class trips always refer with pleasure 

to the three or four days spent at the Hub. Laden 

with souvenirs and with a mind full of new ideas the 

student returns from a journey of this kind with a 

broader knowledge of the world. We wish our 

friends in Ninety-five hon voyage. 

« 

* * 

We think a word concerning the library will not 
be out of place. The number of books taken out by 
the students thus far has been unusually small. 
While it is not to be expected that in the fall term 
when foot-ball and other sports are taking up the 
time that thu library will be used as extensively as in 
the winter, we think that there are many in college 
who would patronize it more if they realized what 
it contains. The volumes grouped together on its 
shelves are not to facilitate scientific inquiry alone, 
nor are its departments of history and literature for 
the exclusive benefit of the book-worm. There is 
not a man in college who could not find entertain- 
ment as well as instruction in the college library. 



Bates Student is up to its usual standard of 
excellence as a newspaper and literary magazine, 
these two departments being combined in a manner 
that makes the publication very interesting. 



i8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— That was a wet game with Hermon. 

— The Boarding Club has a membership of 105. 

— T. S. Bacon, '94, spent a portion of Inst week 
at his home. 

— Fresh paint was applied to the sidewalks the 
night of Sept 29. 

— Saito, '96, has a very unique photo of the rope 
pull, which he is disposing of at very reasonable 
rates. It will pay you to look at it. 

— The vacancy on the Ninety-five Index board 
caused by the resignation of E. O. Bagg, has been 
filled by the election of D. C. Potter. 

— At a business meeting of the Y. M. C. A. held 
Sept. 28, ten active and twenty-one associate mem- 
bers were voted into the Association. 

— A handsomely framed photograph of last 
spring's base-ball team, has been presented to the 
library by C. A. Goodrich, '93, Manager. 

— October is here, and the frost signal displayed 
from the observatory tower reminds us that time is 
passing and that Thanksgiving is not far distant. 

— The scarcity of hymn-books in the new chapel 
has a detrimental effect on the singing. There 
should be a number of new books furnished at once. 

— Fires were started in the So. College furnaces 
early last week, and since that time the recitation 
rooms have been much more habitable than here- 
tofore. 

— The Business Manager was recently heard to 
remark that the man who pays his subscription 
promptly is a gentleman. Moral : Go thou and do 
likewise. 

— Breech loading field artillery will replace the 
old Napoleons now used by the military department 
as soon as the board of trustees can take action on 
the matter. 

— Sophomore and senior privates have been 
initiated into the mysteries of bayonet exercises 
the past week. The squad is commanded by the 
officers of Company C. 

— Temporary goal posts have been erected on the 
campus which are far from ornamental, but which 
serve the purpose very well until more substantial 
structures can be procured. 



— Stevens, '95 has returned. 

— Target practice Saturday morning. 

— T. F. Keith, '94, spent a portion of last week 
at West Brattleboro, Vt. 

— P. E. Davis, '94, who has been detained from 
college by sickness has returned. 

— Piof. Cooley will for the present have charge 
of the first-year class in agriculture. 

— Workmen removed the injured hands of the 
chapel clock last week, and regilded them. 

— T. F. Keith, '94, will continue to represent the 
Springfield Eejniblican at the college this year. 

— W. E. Sanderson, '94, who has been working 
in Boston for some time has returned to college. 

— Mrs. G. E. Sage, wife of Lieut. Sage, has been 
spending a few days at the home of Pres. Goodell. 

— The following are the amounts contributed for 
the support of the base-ball team, by the different 
classes: Senior, §118; Junior, $65; Sophomore, 
$110.50; Freshman, $86.50; first year, $24. Total, 



— Owing to a mistake of the printer, the name 
of Harry Robinson Sherman of Dartmouth, Mass., 
a member of the freshman class, (four years' course) 
was omitted in our last issue. Mr. Sherman's room 
is 3 S. C. 

— Work on the new barn is progressing rapidly. 
During the past week the carpenters have raised 
the framework of one of the ells, while the stone 
and brick layers are fast completing work on the 
foundations. 

— The announcement on the bulletin board last 
Thursday of the new appointments in the battalion 
was a genuine surprise. The fortunate Sophomores 
received the congratulations of the multitude and 
of course treated everybody. 

— The annual exhibition of the Hampshire Agri- 
cultural Society was held at Hampshire Park, 
Sept. 26 and 27. Members of the college received 
complimentary tickets for the first day, all regular 
college exercises being omitted. 

— All members of the college who are correspon- 
dents or contributors to any newspaper or periodi- 
cal, and all who intend to engage in this work, are 
requested to hand their names to C. F. Walker, 
'94, secretary of the Press Club. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



19 



— Smead, '94, and Pentecost, '96, will run the 
furnaces this season. 

— Steps are being taken to have So. College 
lighted with electricity. 

— Moore, '96, will leave for Chicago and the fair 
tomorrow. He will be absent about two weeks. 

— Target practice has been carried on during 
the pasi week. The details are in charge of Lieut. 
C. L. Brown. 

— Pres. and Mrs. Goodell gave a reception to the 
members of the faculty and their wives Friday 
evening, Sept. 29. 

— Hereafter all excuses from Sunday or from 
morning chapel must be submitted to Prof. Wash- 
burne for registration. 

— In accordance vs'ith the recommendation of Col. 
Hughes some fifteen books on military subjects have 
been placed in the library. 

— The Freshmen have been sufficiently drilled in 
the setting-up exercises, and are now learning to 
march in column of fours. 

— The Cosmopolitan, Outlook (formerly the Chris- 
tian Union), Arena, and Oraphic will be placed in 
the reading room this term. 

— The battalion will be drilled in the extended 
order as soon as the Freshmen become sufficiently 
proficient in the manual of arms. 

— The following promotions have been made in 
the corps of cadets : tobe cadet band sergeant, W. C. 
Brown; tobe cadet corporals, Shultis, Co. A.; 
Burrington, Co, D. ; Clapp, Co. C. ; Leamy, Co. B. ; 
DeLuce, Co. D. ; Saito, Co. C. ; Edwards, Co. D. 

— The North College stoves are beginning to be 
put in use and those unfortunate occupants of the 
building whose rooms are not yet supplied with 
those useful articles of furniture are pondering over 
problems in algebra protected by hats and over- 
coats. 

— The Glee Club has organized as follows : 
Leader, G. A. Billings ; manager, F. E. DeLuce ; 
1st tenor, S. F. Howard '94, G. D. Leavens '97; 
2d tenor, G. A. Billings '95, T. S. Bacon '94; 1st 
bass, A. B. Smith, '95, E. -A. Bagg, '97 ; 2d bass, 
F. E. DeLuce '95, G. R. Mansfield, '97. Prof. 
Charmbury will act as instructor. 



— Dr. Seerley of Springfield has been training the 
foot-ball team with very gratifying results. Practice 
has been held every afternoon and the large number 
of men who have turned out to support the second 
team has greatly facilitated the work. 

— Those who arc interested in ornithology will do 
well to read a number of very interesting books on 
the subject that have recently been added to the 
college library. One of these, "Our Native Birds 
of Song and Beauty," is especially handsome. 

— William R. Greenough of Providence, R. I., the 
oldest son of Ex-president Greeuoiigh, principal of 
the We'^tfield Normal School, was married at New- 
ton, Mass., last Wednesday evening to Miss Eliza 
S. Smith, daughter of ex-president Clark of this 
college. 

— The drill hall floor has received a coat of var- 
nish and the room is now in readiness for occupancy. 
The sheathing injured by the base-ball piactice of 
the winter term has been replaced and provision 
will be made by the association to prevent further 
damage. 

— Arrangements have been made by the Tennis 
Association for the annual fall tournament, and the 
names of contestants have been posted. A tax of 
ten cents has been levied on the college to pay for 
two prizes, five dollars for doubles and three dollars 
for singles. 

— A bulletin is being prepared by the Hatch Ex- 
periment Station concerning the work of the de- 
partment of Horticulture. The report of the experi- 
ments that have been carried on by concerning the 
relation of electricity to plant growth will also be 
made public. 

— While the term thus far has been comparatively 
free from the class disturbances usually so detri- 
mental to the college work there have been occa- 
sional demonstrations of patriotism, especially in 
the evening, which indicate that the spirit of 
rivalry stdl exists. 

— The reading room association has decided to 
place the following publications in the college 
library : Arena, Cosmopolitan, Harper's, Century, 
Scribner's, New England Magazine, Forum, Review 
of Reviews, Public Opinion. The remaining papers 
and periodicals will be sold at auction, probably 
some time next week. 



20 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— President Goodell lately received notification 
that in consequence of the enforcement of a law 
that was passed in the legislature some two years 
ago, he would be required to submit the annual re- 
port of the college on Oct. 15. As a consequence 
the catalogue will be issued this term instead of at 
the close of the winter term. 

— Setsusabura Tanaka, Assistant Professor of 
the Imperial University, and Agriculturist of the 
Central Experiment Station, Tokyo, Japan, and T. 
Minami, Professor of the Sapporo Agricultural Col- 
lege at Hakkaido, Japan, spent a portion of last 
week inspecting the college and experiment stations. 
Mr. Minarai is a member of the Jury of Awards at 
the World's Columbian Exposition. 

— Friday afternoon, Sept. 29, the Sophomore 
class defeated the Freshman class and the first 3'ear 
men in a tu2-of-war. The teams lined up as fol- 
lows : Ninety-sis, H. C. Burlington, H. H. Roper, 
B. K. Jones, A. S. Kinney, C. A. Nutting, P. A. 
Leamy, captain. Ninety-seven and first year men, 
E. A. Bagg, captain, J. M. Barry, R. H. Vaughan, 
A. D. Hall, F. W. Colbv, E. B. Allen. The time 
was two minutes. Prof. Washburne acted as 
referee. 

— Pres. I. C. Greene, '94, of the college natural 
history society has been invited by the General 
Committee of the Woild's Columbian Exposition, 
to confer with the World's Congress Auxiliary on 
an Ornithological Congress in regard to delivering 
an address or preparing a paper for the Ornitholog- 
ical Congress which is to open Oct. 16 and continue 
during the week. Our natural history society may 
well feel proud of such an honor being conferred 
upon one of its members. 

— Miss Rose L. Davis has received the appoint- 
ment of assistant to Prof. Litner, State Entomolo- 
gist of New York, and will soon leave for her new 
field of labor in Albany. Miss Davis has been em- 
ployed at the Inscctary for the last three years and 
a half and has become very proficient in entomol- 
ogy. When Prof. Litner visited Amherst last 
June, he was much ])!eased with her work on insects, 
and on the recommendatiou of Prof. Fernald, he 
has now offered her this situation at a much larger 
salary than she has received at the Insectary. — Am- 
herst Record. 



—An atlas of Massachusetts, consisting of fifty- 
four charts, has been placed in the library reading 
room. The publication is the resnlt of the topo- 
graphical surveys made in cooperation by the United 
States Geological Survey and the Commissioners of 
the Commonwealth. 

— Thirty-three new members have thus far been 
admitted to the college societies, as follows : 

D. G. K. G. L. Burnham, F. W. Colby, H. S. 
Fairbanks, R. L. Farnsworth, C. I. Goessmann, 

E. D. Palmer, H. E. Stearns, F. E. Sweetser. 

Q. T. V. E. A. Bagg, J. L. Bartlett, T. H. 
Charmbury, L. L. Cheney, J. A. Emrich, A. D. 
Hall, H. F. Howe, L. M. Huntress, C. A. King. 

Phi Sigma Kappa. J. R. Eddy, G. D. Leavens, 
G. R. Mansfield, C. A. Norton, P. H. Smith. 

College Shakespearean Club. G. H. Bailey, 

F. W. Barclay, R. P. Coleman, M. E. Cook, P. F. 
Felch, A. H. Fittz, H. C. Hunter, F. P. Lane, A. 
M. Nowell, C. F. Palmer, C. A. Peters. 



un\ni. 



'80. "In the Loan bill recently passed by the 
Aldermen there is an appropriation of $300,000, 
for the widening of Harrison avenue to 80 feet. 
* * * To Councilman William C. 
Parker of Ward 10 is due the birth of the appropri- 
ation for widening Harrison Avenue. Mr. Parker 
is a pleasant faced gentleman of average stature, 
with a kindly genial ring in his voice that one likes 
to hear and a hearty grasp that one likes to receive. 
He dresses in a neat business suit of gray and wears 
a brownish beard parted in the middle. By profes- 
sion he is a lawyer. He is a graduate of the class 
of 1880 of the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
at Amherst. As chairman of the committee on 
Chinese he is widely known, and his dislike of 
Mongolians has been made apparent many times. 
He acknowledged to * Journal reporter that his real 
purpose in securing the $300,000 appropriation was 
to wipe that section of the city off the map. Mr. 
Parker says he is determined that the nuisance shall 
exist no longer; that the nightly gambling and 
opium smoking that is reported to be going on shall 
be stopped, and that he has taken this method of 
cleaning Harrison Avenue of the Celestials." — 
Boston Journal. 



AGGIE LIFE- 



21 



'88. The address of E. E. Knapp is 1018 Rout 
Ave., Pueblo, Col. 

'89. R. P. Seilew is attached to the advertising 
department of the New England Farmer, Boston, 
Mass. 

'90. C. E. Bliss is now at 120 West Monroe St., 
Phoenix, Arizona. 

'91. E. P. Felt who has been studying at Cornell 
for the past two years, is teacher of Science at the 
Clinton Liberal Institute, Fort Plain, N. Y. 

'92. F. H. Plumb, W. I. Boyntou, R. P. Lyman 
a.id A. T. Beals were at the college last week. 

'92. G. E. Taylor and Miss Lila Harrington 
were married Sept. 27, at North Amherst. The 
ceremony was attended by a large number of 
friends and classmates. 

NINETY-THREE. 

H. D. Clark spent a short time at the college last 
week. He also entered the Veterinary department 
of Magill University, Montreal. 

H. C. Davis is in business with his brother at 
Savannah, Ga. 

C. A. Goodrich will study medicine at Columbia 
College in New York. 

H. J. Harlow is at his home in West Boylston, 
Mass. 

F. H. Harlow is at his home at Marshfield. 

E. A. Hawkes is in Hudson, Mass. 

F. H. Henderson's address is West Boylston, 
Mass. 

E. C. Howard of Wilbraham visited the College 
last week. 

F. S. Hoyt has been appointed professor of 
science and mathematics at the Bridgeton Academy, 
Bridgton, N. J. 

E. H. Lehnert intends to take a course in veter- 
inary at Montreal. 

J. R. Perry of Boston, who is in business with 
his father spent a short time at the College last 
week. 

C. A. Smith has entered the Sheffield Scientific 
School. His address is 347 Crown Street, New 
Haven, Ct. 

H. F. Staples is principal of the West Stock- 
bridge High School. 



L. A. F. Tiuoco is travelling in Europe. 

E. J. Walker is with his father iu the milk busi- 
ness at West Boylston, Mass. His address is Clin- 
ton, Mass. 

L. W. Smith, of Ashfield, spent Sunday with 
friends here. He will start for Chicago soon. 
After visiting the V&iv he will lake charge of High- 
land Farm, Mauteno, 111. 



[charise. 



Exchanges arrive slowly at the commencement of 
the new college year but as the weeks pass by the 
pile on the saiicLura table grows larger until October 
finds nearly all the publications in their accustomed 
places. We find a number of "Commencement 
Numbers" on hand. These are usually of a high 
order of excellence, showing that care has been 
taken to make them attractive typographically as 
well as editorially, but Commencement is a thing of 
the past, and the columns and columns of baccalau- 
reate s ermons, class day poetry and orations seem 
out of place amid the bustle of the fall term. 

As we glance through the columns of the Sep- 
tember publications we see everywhere indications 
of progress. The Freshman lists of many institu- 
tions are larger than ever before, and as a result all 
departments of the institutions are prospering. 
Foot-ball of course is the chief topic of conversa- 
tion. In the contributors' department as well as in 
the editorial columns the prospects of the fall cam- 
paign are thoroughly discussed. 

The Dartmouth in its first issue for the term pre- 
sents the public with an excellent likeness of the 
late Prof. P.'ilterson, professor of oratory. 

The Plioenixian of Earlham contained, besides a 
large budget of commencement news, one or two 
excellent articles on literary subjects. 

We acknowledge receipt of the Hermonite. 

Our friends over the river at Easthamplon are 
making earnest preparations for the fall work in 
foot-ball, if the editorials in the Willistonian may be 
taken as an indication. Wc wish them a successful 
season. 

The enrolled students at Vassar number 450. 
Many applicants were refused owing to lack of 
accommodation. — Ex. 



22 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS. 

Base-hall Association. President, S. F. Howard, '94; secretary! 
E. H. Clark, '95; directors, A. J. Morse, '9-1, M. J. Sullivan, '95, F. 
H. Read, '96; captain, E. H. Clark, '95; manager, T. S. Bacon, '94. 

Foot-ball Association- President, R. E. Smith, '94; secretary and 
treasurer, F. L. Warren, '95; directors, E.E. Smith, '94, E. L. Board- 
man, '94, H. S. Fairbanks, '95, S. P. Toole, '95, Washburn, '96. Cap 
tain, J. E. Gifford, '94; manager, L. Manley, '94. 

Athletic Association. President, L. Manley, '94; secretary and 
ti'easurer, R. S. Jones, '95; directors, L. Mauley, '94, J. E. Gifford, 
'94, Toole, '95, E. S. Jones, '95, Day, '96. 

Polo Association. President, S. F. Howard, '94; eecretaiy and 
treasurer, W. C. Brown, .'95; directors, H. J. Fowler, '94, C. W- 
Crehore, '95, J. L. Marshall, '90; manager, C. W. Crehore. 

Tennis Association. President, H. M. Fowler '94; secretary and 
ti-easurer, A. B. Smith, '95; directors, T. S. Bacon, '94, T. P. Foley, 
'95, J. E. Green '96. 

Reading Room Association. President, A. C. Curtis, '94; secretary 
and treasurer, W. A. Boot, '95; directors, C. P. Lounsbury, '94, D. 
C. Potter, '95, H. H. Eoper, '96. 

Natural History Society President, I. C. Greene, '94; secretary 
and ti-easurer, H. I,. Frost, '95; directors, L. H. Bacon, '94, T. S 
Bacon, '94, E. D. White, '94, L. M. Barker, '94, E. H. Vaughan, '96. 

Press Club. President, T. S. Bacon, '94; secretary and treasurer, 
C. F. Walker, '94. 

M. A. C. Boarding Club. President and first director,Burrington, 
'96; vice president and second director, H. M. Fowler, '94; third 
director n-nd treasurer, J. Marsh, '95; fourth director, A. J. Morse 
'94; fifth director, Spaulding, '94; sixth director, W. L.Morse, '95. 



T. M. G. A. TOPICS. 



Oct. 5th — .Sowing and Eeaping. Gen. 25 : 29-34 ; 

27 : 33-35 ; Heb. 12 : 16 ; Gal. 6:7. C. 

L. Brown. 
Oct. 8tli — Tempted yet without Sin. Luke 4 :1-13. 

G. A. Billings. 
Oct. 12th — The Working of a Wondrous Change. 

I John 1 : 8-10 ; 2 : 2 ; Ezek. 36 : 25-27. 
G. D. Leavens. 

Oct. 16th — Repentance Unto Life. — Acts II : 18 ; 

II Cor. 7 :10. E. H. Henderson. 



The first college paper was published at Dart- 
mouth in 1800. It was called the Gazette and had 
Daniel Webster as one of its contributors. 



A TIME TO LAUGH. 

I saw the man who drove the hearse 
Grin like a fiend for full a minute ; 

"Why, sir," I asked, "this ill-timed mirth?" 
"Because," he chuckled, "I'm not in it." 



9 



22 SCUOOL ST., liOSION, 

Designed and engraved the title page of this boolt. 
You have seen his work in the college publications 
of Bates, Beloit, Bowdoin, Colby, Mass. Agr'l Col- 
lege, Tufts, Wellesley and Yale. 
jes-He will submit you rough sketches and samples free. 



^^Culver's Domestic Bakery-^ 

You will find the largest and best selected stock of Candy 
in town. Call and see for yourself. The price will please 
you. 

5 PHCENIX ROW, AMHERST. 

M. N. SPEAR, 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



M, G. GOOD^WIN, 

DEALER IN 

NEW AND SECOND-HAND BICYCLES. 
13 Phoenix Row, .... Amherst, Mass. 



LIA^EKY STABLE. 

SINGLE TEAMS TO LET AT FAIR PRICES. 
Pleasant St., Amherst. 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 




LaoiD Goods are Ours." 



WILLIAMS' BLOCK, A^MHERST, MASS. 



Schillare's 
Photographic Studio. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIJf STBMMT, 



NOIt,TBAMl"rON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



23 



FOUHTAIN PENS. 

SBTMOUE, WIRT, SWANS and the UNIVERSITY 

FOUNTAIN PEN wtich is selUng for ouly §1.50. 

All pens warranted to work WELL or 

money refunded. 

Honest Goods. 



M. A. C, 



BOTANY OUTFITS 

GUM PAPER, LENSES, HERBARIUM SLIPS, 
BOTANY PRESSES, &c. 

NOTE BOOKS OF ALL KINDS AND SIZES, PAPER, 
WHITE GLOVES, ATHLETIC GOODS, &c. 

Prices Low. [[^^Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



AiVlHERST HOUSE 



OYER 



"n 



T, L. PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

A.MSERST, MASS. 




cJ. xL" 



DE.4.LER IN 



tf MGHES, GItOGilS, JEW EIiHY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

PIME STS-TIOHBRY. 
REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROK/IPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



H.QP 



H 



H 




A-I^KCEUST , 



IvI-A-SS. 



A High Grade 
Wheel for a lit- 
tle money. 

Solid Tire, $85. 
C[isliionTire,$90. 
Pneumatic 
-,: Tire, $115. 

'■^' Send foraCatalogue, 
fl3»An coiTespondence will receive prompt attention.-^a 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES, 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY OF 
ALL KINDS, BOTANY OUTFITS, WHITE 
GLOVES, CHOICE CONFECTION- 
ERY, LUNCH CRACKERS, &c. 

FIRST CZASS GOODS. PBICJES ZOW. 



13 SOUTH COLUEIGE 






AMHERST COLLEGE 

#Co-OperatiYe Steal Lamdrj 

and Carpet RenovatiiiE Establislimeiit. 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



24 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LAKGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes ^^ Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Slieet M^usic, 



Music Books, 



Strings 

FOR the: violin, banjo, guitar, 

AT— — 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 

AMBEJtST AND NORTHAMPION. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Kazors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEU F 

AMHERST, MASS. 



.^DENTISTS. G,., 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
E. N. BROW]^, D. D. S. 

CTTTLEM'S BIjOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
e -A.. 3VI. TO B I». H/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



^rugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CHOICE CONEECTIONERT, BEST ICE CREAM AND 

SODA WATER, VIOLIN, GUITAR AND 

BANJO STRINGS, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO and SMOKERS' SUPPLIES. 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIAITT AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 FHCENIX ROW. 

Order your ©@,^Sb here. 



1^. ^^. O. ST■U■:DE3^TTS 

WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUAETERS FOB 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODGETT & CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



For Euits and Fall DvarcQata 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



E. Pv. BENNETT, 



^e) 



Jeweler, Optician, Watcliiaker. 



PINE GOODS. LOW PRICES. 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-o£Bce. 



FINE ITAL m FAIENCE LAMPS, 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, iJl.OO UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, $2.00 AND $2.50. 
For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 

O. G. COUCM & SON'So 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseaf, 

HAIR DRESSZMG ROOMS. 

EAZOES HONED. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 

office of 

E. A. THOMAS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Rlockf Amheratf Mass, 



H 



ilOILET fi^TKZLEg 



A FINE LINE OF 



SMOKING TOBACCO, PIPES, &c., 
CIGARS AND CIGARETTES. 



DEOEL'S DRU& STORt 



Amherst House Block, 



Amherst, lass, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Eifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wcod's Hotel. 



1850. 



-GO TO - 



1893. 



LOVELL'S PHOIOGRAPHIG STUDIO 



FOB THE BEST WORK. 



Society, Glass and Group Ulork a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



5. g. DI(?HIC^gO(^, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 
WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



J^^Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered wlien 
desired. 



.^T THE 



AMHEcRST CASH SHQfi $mm 

Toll can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSOISr, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 

A. GLYNN, 



/ 



4 TAI LOR> 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Clea7iing and Pressing a Specialty. 



CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



THE 

flftaseacbusctts 

HQincultural 

College 

1. M. TWO ITEARS' COURSE in Agriculture and kindred 
sciences. 

2. M. POUR ITEilkRS' COURSE, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. Eleven courses of study ai'e provided Senior j'ear, nine 
of which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Chemistry, Ento- 
mology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in the 
higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricitj', 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study. 
English and Military Science are required. 

3. a. F©ST GR^BU^TS €®1IRSE of two years lead- 
ing to the degree of Master of Science. Residence at the college not 
required. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President. 



c 



VOL. IV. 




■Mjiss. 

Oct. 18, 1893. 






arpf'n'C^r 



>rf housf , 



.PRINTERS, 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS. AGRICULTURy^L COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply in lim- 
ited quantities, 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plante, Slirubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address, 



Prof. S, T. Maynard, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



THE MERST 




ND CAB 



D 



rirn 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES , PILLOWS, STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 

WINDOW SHADES. DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS. RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



s-A."v"E nvLoisrE^s- B'sr g-oiistg- to 

C, H, SANDERSOf(& CO., 

FOR 

Sis, Ulstefs,8iiitii[s, Hats, Caps, Gte 

AND MITTENS. 

Suits made to order, - §13 to .f 35. 
Trousers made to order, 3 to 10. 
Overcoats made to order, 10 to 35. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



DflJ^GIflG SCHOOli 

WILL RE-OPEN OCT. 2. 

Do not wait until spring term and then crowd 2 or 3 hours a week, 
Imt start in October and take your time. Receptions, to members of 
the school oiihj, last Wednesday of each month from S till 10-30., 

Will ue at Pacific HALL(Cook's Blk) Wedoesdavs from 7-30 to 8 30. 



EDWIN NELSON, 
Bookseller and Stationer, 

COLLEGE TEXT-BOOES, NEW AND SECOND HAND. 
No. 3, Post Office Block, Amherst. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FIXE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

:k-cjbbe:k o-ooiDS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



All Goods STRICTLY CASK and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 



10 PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



ii^Jiepnifing dovf' u'hile you rvait,^^^ 

T, W. SLOAN, 

2 I'BCEXIX ROW. 

5. A. PHILLIPS, 

Eraetkal Plarriber, 

STEAA\ AND CAS FITTER. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam ana Hot Water Heatius a Specialty. 




LIFE. 



VOL. IV. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBER 18, 1893. 



No. 3 



Published Fortniglitly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Oflioe as second-class mail matter. 

BO AMD OF EDITORS: 

C. P. WALKER, '94, Editor-in-chief. 

G. H. &IEEWIN, '94, Business Manager. 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. F. KEITH, '94, 

F. L. GREENE, '94, T. P. FOLEY, '95, 

C. B. LANE, '95, R. A. COOLET, '95, 

S.L. HATWARD,'96. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communica- 
tions should tie addressed AGGIE Life, Amherst Mass. 



We would remind our subscribers that we can- 
not be responsible for their safe receipt of Aggie 
Life in case of change of residence unless we are 
immediately notified of their new address. 



Who does not admire the "elegancj', facility, and 
golden cadence of poecy?" Time was when the 
columns of Life used to abound in rhymes — stray 
bits scattered in among the more prosaic annals 
and chronicles of college life to illumine and en- 
lighten the whole. Lately our contributions from 
the muse have fallen off with alarming rapidity. 
We hope the poets have not all left us. 



The interest centered about several match games 
of chess during the past few weeks has led to the 
suggestion that a chess club be formed. Heretofore 
those who have wished to play have challenged each 
other and several tournaments of minor importance 
have thus beencarried on but with the formation of 
a club these rather unimportant matches can be 
combined. There are a number of students who 
exhibit a deep interest in this game and a chess club 



will undoubtedly meet with their approbation and 
command their hearty support. 



The game with Wesleyan University last Friday 
was a good example of what practice and hard work 
will do. At the beginnning of the season the out- 
look for a successful campaign was rather cloudy 
and the first two games were somewhat discourag- 
ing but the team has had a second eleven on the 
field nearly every day for some time and the results 
are evident. The management has reason to be 
proud of this improvernent and with continued in- 
terest in the daily practice there is no reason why 
the team should not make a much better showing 
than heretofore. 



The question of forming a bicycle club among 
the wheelmen of college has been considerably agi- 
tated of late. We cannot see any reason why such 
a movement would not be advisable. There are 
enough riders of the silent steed to give a club the 
necessary support and others who have not given 
the matter much attention would ally themselves 
with the organization. In former years when the 
"ordinary" was the typical "bike" there existed in 
college a club of a large membership but of late 
years there has been no such organization. Let 
some one who is thoroughly interested in this, boom 
the matter and we shall soon have a wheel club. 



The directors of the reading-room association 
have made arrangements to have the center bench 
in the reading-room replaced by tables on which the 
magazines and some of the weeklies will be placed, 
instead of being fastened with locks to the shelves. 
This arrangement will not only relieve the periodi- 
cals of the damage incident to the old method, but 
will also add much to the comfort of those using 
them. The only objection to the plan is the possi- 
bility that some of the papers may be taken from 



25 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the table and not returned. It should be dittinctly 
understood that the papers are not to be removed 
from the reading-room. They are there for the use 
of the whole college. Anyone removing them for 
the sake of his own convenience or da-iiagiug them 
in any way deprives the rest of the college of a part 
of their just privileges. We trust that the students 
will take care that the confidence of the directors in 
the honor of the student body is not misplaced. 



Of all the subjects in the curriculum few have 
such a direct bearing on our future life as has the 
study of political economy. Dealing, as it does, 
with the great principles underlying national policy 
and prosperity, it supplies the fundamental knowl- 
edge essential to the right exercise of political priv- 
ileges. That one of the highest duties of man is 
that .arising from his relation to the state, none will 
deny. In the present state of political excitement 
and social agitation, with grave problems confront- 
ing tlie statesman on every side, it is highly neces- 
sary that as many as possible of the voters should 
have au intelligent appreciation of the causes and 
remedies of the various evils demanding attention. 
That the Seniors appreciate the value of political 
science in their future career is proved by the size 
of that division, which is the largest of the class. 



The recent class trip of Ninety-flve was very suc- 
cessful, affording great pleasure and profit to those 
who participated in it. They were en.abled to see 
the practical application of what is taught in the 
class room. Theoiy and practice combined always 
give the best results. So many and so varied were 
the experiences of the class that a great d^al was 
learned outside of the direct line of science. A 
new feature of the trip is the offering of prizes, by 
the Horticultural department for the best essays, 
descriptive of the trip to Fitchburg, Boston, Arling- 
ton and Wellesley, written by members of the class. 
Such prizes served as an incentive to a careful 
study of the construction of green-houses, the 
methods employed in market-gardening, and all the 
details of the business. In combining this literary 
work with the practical knowledge and pleasure of 
the trip there is no question but that the Junior 
receives as much benefit during the few days he is 
away, as he would if he remained in college. 



^©n-tribwted. 



HISTORIC DEERFIELD. 

A.ti'^ student of this college wishing to take a 
pleasant and instructive trip some Saturday vcill 
perhaps be interested in Deerfield. One day, how- 
ever, would be but a short time in which to visit all 
the places of interest in this historic town. 

The ride from Amherst to Sunderland would alone 
be a source of pleasure, but while crossing the bridge 
which leads from Sunderland village to the Deerfield 
side of tlie Connecticut River, the scenery at once 
excites the admiration. Before you is a conical mass 
of red sandstone rising grandly to a height of about 
five hundred feet above the level of the water which 
flows beneath. This is Mt. Sugarloaf , the pride of 
Deerfield people : and well m.iy they be proud of a 
hill which presents such a view from its summit. 
It is truly beautiful to stand on "Table Rock" and 
see Nature's beauties blending so peacefully with 
man's handiwork. On the left, the river which was 
crossed but a few moments before, flows smoothly 
on toward the Sound, its winding course and outline 
showing distinctly for many miles. At your feet 
are villages. South Deerfield on the right and .Sun- 
derland on the left. Waving fields of corn and 
tobacco show their angular and curved boundaries. 
Here and there are dark plots of wood-land ; while 
beyond are more villages. To the southwest is 
Whately ; to the southeast is Amherst, with its spires 
and college towers reaching toward the morning sky. 
Truly, all is grand! But behind you, a man is 
approaching. It is Mr. Jewett, the owner of the 
premises, with a telescope across his shoulder, 
steadying it by the tripod standard which he bears 
before him. He says, "It is not a very clear day 
but perhaps this will enable you to see some things," 
and placing it on the ground, with his skilled hands 
he directs it toward the south. You look, and he 
says "Do you see anything?" 

"Yes, I see something. I should think it was a 
tower." 

He then tells you that it is a tower in Hartford, 
Connecticut. 

Now a train of cars comes from the south and 
stops at the depot in South Deerfield. This calls 
the attention to Deerfield once more, and reminds 
one that it is time to descend, for this town has 



AGGIE LIFE. 



27 



many sad and interesting stories to tell. In a few 
moments tlie foot of tlie mountain is reached, and 
looking back the open brows are seen expressive of 
"Why did you leave me so soon?" 

One hurries through South Deerfield for this is 
not unlike other villages, but in passing may be 
noticed on the principal hotel, "Bloody Brook 
House." The meaning of this is explained b}' a 
monument which stands about one-third of a mile 
north. 

In September, 1675, Captain Lathrop and eighty 
men called the "Flower of Essex" came up from 
Hadley after grain. On their return they were sur- 
rounded by seven or eight hundred savages, just as 
they were crossing the brook which flows near the 
monument. Only seven or eight escaped to tell of 
the massacre. It is said that the blood shed turned 
the waters of the brook red. From this the stream 
derives its name, Bloody Brook. 
• About three miles to the north there is a hill near 
the foot of which there is a mound rising quite 
abruptly to a height of about twenty or thirty feet 
above the level of the surrounding territory. This 
is known as "Squaw. Hill." The tradition concern- 
ing it is what makes it of interest to us. 

Just before the Indian massacre of Deerfield, a 
squaw was seen on its summit digging up human 
bones. The squaw had lived for some years in a 
hut near by and was acquainted in the neighborhood. 
The white people questioned her about the matter 
and found that the bones were the remains of her 
child whom she had buried there. She was prepar- 
ing to flee, knowing that it would not be safe for 
her to remain at her old home during the massacre 
which was to follow. Some people of a neighboring 
house obtained from her warning of the coming 
trouble. This was the first and perhaps the only 
intimation of danger which the people of this district 
had. 

About a mile and a half to the north we find "Old 
Deerfield," a quiet peaceful village with one long, 
straight street. Here is located the Memorial Hall. 
One may spend hours of investigation and reflection 
here where a great many articles pertaining to 
Indian, domestic and military life excite the interest. 
In one room is the door to the "Old Indian House," 
showing the hole which the savages chopped through 
it, and through which the only inmate of the house. 



an iuvalid lady, was shot. In every room are 
found many things of interest. One apartment 
is fitted up as a library, and contains many old vol- 
umes, pamphlets and papers such as the first issue 
of the Youth's Companion. This is one of the most 
interesting places to visit in Deerfield. 

There are more places of interest but, if one is 
now tired of sight-seeing, he may go and visit Mr. 
George Sheldon. No other man is so well posted 
on historic Deerfield as he. He would be pleased 
to sit and tell in his interesting way, stories relating 
to men, places or objects of Deerfield. He has said 
"I have on my own land the site of an Indian vil- 
lage ; and I can locate some of the wigwams, and 
also a burial place from which I have taken up many 
skeletons." e. a. c. 



SOPHOMORE MOUNTAIN DAT. 

The Sophomore class took advantage of pleasant 
weather last week to visit the " Notch." The 
party, in charge of Professor Maynard, left the 
Botanic Museum at eight o'clock, on the morning of 
Oct. 13th, and arrived at the " Notch" at half-past 
nine. The forenoon was spent in exploring the 
cliff and surroundings, collecting such specimens of 
ferns and flowers, as were to be found taking 
observations from the summit and in making a gen- 
eral survey of the surroundings. After dinner the 
party visited other places of interest in the imme- 
diate vicinity and were more fortunate than in the 
forenoon, securing specimens for their herbariums. 

The return trip was made by way of South Hadley 
going round the mountain, and coming home by 
way of Hadley. The class feel that they owe Pro- 
fessor Maynard many thanks for his kindness in 
taking them on an excursion affording so much 
pleasure and profit. No doubt every member of the 
class will show his appreciation by increased effort 
in his department in the future. 

Sophomore Mountain Day will long be remem- 
bered by every member of the class of '96 as one of 
the most enjoyable occasions m the history of his 
college days ; when in the future recollections of 
the past present themselves to his mind, the memory 
of a beautiful dsy in October, spent with his class- 
mates among the picturesque scenery of Holyoke 
mountain range, the charming drive with his fun- 
loving associates and the many happy incidents of 



28 



AGGIE LIFE. 



the day will blend together to make Mountain Day 
a bright vision of the past. 



FOOT-BALL. 
Amheest, 26 ; M. A. C, 0. 

Wednesday, Oct. 4, Aggie met Amherst for the 
first time this fall on Pratt Field, and was defeated 
26 to 0. Like pigmies the maroon lined up before 
their heavy purple opponents, but they did them- 
selves justice atevery point. Aggie found no trouble 
in breaking the heavy Amherst line, but struck a 
snug on end plays. Bagg and Shaw, two nevr men 
who were playing their first game, carried off the 
honors for Aggie. The line blocking of the former 
reminded us of the work of our last year's backs, 
while the tackling of the latter was deserving of the 
applause which it called forth. Twice Aggie was 
within three yards of the Amherst goal, but she 
lacked weight, and the game was waged against the 
well known Amherst determination to shut us out. 

Much surprise was shown at the success of our 
flying V, Aggie having no trouble whatever to gain 
15 yards at each attempt, while Amherst failed to 
find any means to break it up. 

Barnes scored the first touchdown in about ten 
minutes and Pratt kicked a goal. Aggie having the 
ball would, by hard line work, gradually work it up 
to Amherst's 25 yard line or nearer, and then lose 
it on four downs. Immediately a few long runs 
would result in Amherst's scoring. Despite this 
fact Aggie kept the ball on Amherst's territory fully 
three-fourths of the time. Amherst's weak spot at 
all times seemed to be between the guards and 
center, while Aggie should be criticized for her 
slowness in lining up and in action. 

For Amherst, Deering and Barnes played the best 
game. The teams lined up as follows : 

M. A. C. POSITION. AMHERST. 

Manley, right end, left, Rosa 

Higgins, right tackle, left, Tyler 

Boardman, right guard, left, Cauthers 

Smith, center, Kimball 

Shaw, left end, right, Russell 

Fairbanks, left tacicle, right, Stedman 

Burrington, left guard, right, Penney 

Putnam, quarter-back, Pratt Bros. 

Gifford, 1 i,„,^, v,„„i,„ / Hawes 

\ Barnes 



Marshall 
Bagg. 



,} 



half-backs. 



full-backs. 



Deering 



Umpire— Fowler, '94, M.A.C. Referee— W.H. Talcott, 
Amherst. Touchdowns — Barnes 2, Deering 2, Hawes. 
Goal— Pratt 3. Score at eud of first half— 12-0. 

Wesletak University, 18; M. A. C, 12. 

Aggie played at Middletown Friday, Oct 13, and 
after a hard fought game of twenty-minute halves 
was defeated 18-12. 

Aggie winning the toss, twelve yards is gained by 
the flying V. Bagg bunts centre for several yards. 
When in close proximity to the Wesleyan goal, 
Aggie fumbles and Wilson dashes 75 yards down 
the field for a touchdown, and Gordon kicks goal. 
Seerly's wedge is now tried by Aggie with no gain. 
Marsh covers 10 yards and Gifford punts with little 
gain. Wesleyan, in return, punts and is able to 
recover the ball, allowing Stark to work a criss-cross 
and score a touchdown. No goal, score, 10-0. 

Aggie again starts for 10 yards, and Burrington 
and Bagg successfully break the Wesleyan line. 
Marsh then takes the ball, carrying it to the five 
yard line. Here it is lost on four downs and Wes- 
leyan rushes it to the Aggie 25 yard line. Here a 
fumble is made and Palmer has a lively sprint the 
length of the field, scoring Aggie's first touchdown. 
Smith kicks a goal. Score, 10-6. The remainder 
of the half is occupied with hard play at the center 
of the field. 

Second Half — Wesleyan makes seven yards on the 
start off and by short rushes forces the ball to the 
Aggie's 25 yard line. Wilson then carries it over, 
but the try for goal is a failure. Score, 14-6. 

Aggie makes a small gain on the flying V and 
sends Morse for 25 yards. Burrington and Higgins 
successfully buck the line, until Wesleyan's five 
yard line is reached. Third down is called, 
Capt. Gifford orders all up for a V and then easily 
steals out of it and scores. Smith kicks a goal. 
Score, 14-12. Wesleyan takes the ball, and by 
several long runs around the end and elegant block- 
ing Gordon is sent across for the final touchdown, 
but fails at goal. Aggie gains 15 yards by the V, 
but Wesleyan steals the ball. Gordon fails at a 
drop kick for a goal from the field, and the game 
closes. 

The features of the game were the fine blocking 
of Wesleyan, and the work of Gordon and Wilson 
for Wesleyan, and Fairbanks and Bagg, and general 
team work of Aggie. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



29 



The teams lined up as follows : 

M. A. C. POSITION. WESLETAN. 

Manley, right end, left, Steele 

Higgins, right tackle, left, Thoiopson 

Boardman, right guard, ieft, Searles 

Smith, center, Tower 

Burrington, left guard, right, Brownell 

Fairbanks, left tackle, right, Norton 

Marsh, left end, right, Pomeroy 

Putnam, quarter-back, Stark 

GifiFord, right half, left, Mandell 

Palmer, Morse, left half, right, Wilson 

Bagg, full-back, Gordon 

Umpire — Mr. Fowler, M. A. C. Referee — Mr. Cutis, 
Wesleyan. Touchdowns — Palmer, Gifford, Wilson 2, 
Gordon, Stark. Goals — Smith 2, Gordon 1. Time— 40 m. 
A. H. S., 10; M. A. C. '97, 0. 

The Freshman class was defeated by the Amherst 
High School in an uninteresting game played on the 
campus Saturday afternoon in the pouring rain. 
The Freshmen were obliged to play with a number 
of substitutes while the visiting team included sev- 
eral players not members of the institution it repre- 
sented. The teams lined up as follows : 

A. H. S. M. A. C. '97. 

Strong, H. G. left end, right. Huntress 

Sullivan, left tackle, right, Hall 

Bias, left guard, right, C. A. King 

Linnehan, center, Eaton 

Redding, right guard, left, Vaughan 

Baker, right tackle, left, Eddy 

Harris, right end, left, Howe 

Emerson, quarter-back, Emrich 

Atwood I half-backs, /Palmar (Capt.) 

Strong, C. A., / ' (.Barclay (Colby) 

Smith (Capt.), full-back, Goessmann 

Touchdowns, Baker, Atwood. Goal, Smith. 

Referee — Mr. Burrington, M. A. C.,'96. Umpire — Mr. 
McCoy, A. H. S. Time of game — 40 minutes. 



T. M. G. A. TOPICS. 

Oct. 19. Wise and Foolish Builders. Matt. 7: 
24-27 ; I Cor. 3. Leader, F. P. Lane. 

Oct. 22. Missionary Meeting. Mai. 3 : 1-12. 
Leader, C. B. Lane. 

Oct. 26. God's Great Commandment. I John 3 : 
23, 24: John 14: 15-18, 23. Leader, E. H. 
Alderman. 

Oct. 29. Am I Hearing, Obeying, Following? 
Matt. 4: 18-22. Leader, A. B. Smith. 



The St. Johns College team of Fordham will play 
Sunday foot-ball games this fall. 



lotes ^^^ Coirvmen-ts. 



A short lime ago we heard an underclassman 
cautiously enquiring as to the probable time of the 
appearance of the college annual. Now we have a 
certain fellow-feeling for the board of editors which 
impels us to treat with disdain a question so impol- 
itic as the above. Just when or where or how the 
Index is coming out we know not, and it matters 
not, at present, to the student body. It should, 
however, be understood that the publication will 
appear in due time, and will merit the support of 
the whole college. Now is the time for those who 
are wont to excuse themselves from purchasing, 
when the sale is opened, on accountof "hard times" 

to begin to save the pennies. 

» 
» » 

A tired looking member of the Freshman class, 
with a big algebra under his arm, accosted us the 
other morning while on the way from chapel and 
wanted to kuow if the Seniors had to study as hard 
as the underclassmen. He then related how night 
after night he was compelled to burn the midnight 
oil long after the windows of Senior's rooms 
were darkened, only to fail in a vain struggle with 
a;, y and 2, and the theory of exponents. The bell 
stopped ringing at this point and we had to go to 
Pol. Eicon, so the question remained unanswered. 

The subject, however, is a good one for meditation. 

« 

» * 
To the Senior private, military ambition is a 
thing of the [last. To him no day-dreams of glory 
won in the military department present themselves. 
When the drum beats and he hastens to take his 
place in line neither visions of future shoulder- 
straps nor regrets for past chevrons have a place 
in his thoughts. Resignation to the inevitable 
mingles with the thought that never again will he 
have to .submit to military discipline. When the 
welcome '•'■Dismissed!" greets his impatient ears he 
realizes that one more hour of drill is past, that he 
is so much nearer the goal ; and as he looks forward 
to the da}' when he shall receive his long toiled for 
degree, prospective regret at the parting from loved 
scenes and associations is lost in the triumphant 
assurance that there is a good day coming when the 
drum-taps shall no longer disturb his equanimity. 



30 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^olle^f ^otfs- 



— The Freshman class has adopted a constitution. 

— F. L. Greene, '94, recently spent a few days at 
his home. 

— L. H. Bacon, '94, is in Chicago visiting the ex- 
position. 

■ — M. A. C. vs. Williston this afternoon at East- 
hampton. 

— Prof. Wellington has the Senior division in 
German during the absence of the president. 

— S. Kuroda, '95, spent a short time last week in 
Brooklyn, N. Y. where he delivered an address at 
the 1st Congregational Church. 

— The directors of the W. I. L. S. are arranging 
for a New England Town Meeting to be held under 
the auspices of the society in a lew weeks. 

— The orchestra has organized with T. P. Foley, 
'95, as leader, and H. M. Fowler, '94, as manager. 
The membership is not as yet permanently settled. 

— Frank R. Falby of Northboro, Mass., is a new 
member of the Freshman class. Mr. Falby is taking 
the four years' course and rooms at Mr. Shepard- 
son's. 

— The mathematical prize will be offered again 
this year and will be open to the competition of the 
entire Senior class. The examinations, however, 
will cover the work of the Senior division. 

— The regular annual meeting of the Mass. Agri- 
cultural College Alumni Club of Massachusetts was 
called for Tuesday, Oct. 10, 1893, at four p. m. at 
the office of the State Board of Agriculture, at Bos- 
ton. There being no quorum present no business 
was transacted. 

— The report of the college treasurer for 1892-3 
shows that under the Morrill Fund the total re- 
ceipts have been $56,668.66 and the expenditures 
$43,921.74 leaving a balance on hand of $12,746.92. 
Under the Hatch Fund there has been received and 
paid out $15,603.76. 

— There have been offered to the Junior class, by 
by the Horticultural Department of the college, four 
prizes of ten, five, three and two dollars respective- 
ly, for the best essays descriptive of the class trip 
to Boston and vicinity, the decision to be made by 
a committee of the faculty. 



— E. B. Allen, '97, has left college. 

— M. A. Carpenter, '91, is in Chicago at the 
Fair. 

— The first Senior exercise in oratory was held in 
the new chapel October 17. 

— Burgess, '95, has returned from Chicago where 
he has been serving on the Columbian guards. 

— The Freshmen have arranged a game with the 
Hopkins Academy for Oct. 25 on the home grounds. 

— Mrs. S. T. Maynard has been elected second 
vice-president o( the Woman's club, lately organized 
in town. 

— Prof. Mills was absent from college last week 
attending the centennial exercises at Williams 
College. 

— Members of Ninety-six are beginning to think 
of the election of their Index board, which is not 
far distant. 

— Meetings of Grange No. 16, P. of H., are held 
at Grange hall, Amherst, the first and third Friday 
evening of each month. All student members of 
the Order are cordially invited to attend. 

— The annual auction for the sale of newspapers 
and periodicals was held under the auspices of the 
reading room association October 10. A. H. Kirk- 
land officiated as auctioneer and as a result of his 
labors about fifty dollars was realized. 

— The regular quarterly meeting of the Board of 
Control of the State Experiment Station was held 
at Amherst Oct. 5. Routine business only was 
transacted. The director, Dr. Goessmann, has 
been chosen by the board as delegate to the Con- 
gress of Experiment Stations, and also to the Agri- 
cultural Congresses at Chicago this month. 

— Extensive improvements will soon be made in 
the North College Reading Room. The shelves now 
occupying the centre of the room will be removed 
and a number of tables substituted upon which will 
be placed the magazines and most of the weeklies. 
The destructive iron-rods now in use on the othar 
shelves will be dispensed with and wooden fasten- 
ings such as will not injure the papers will be used 
instead. It is the aim of the association to make 
the reading room available not only for reading but 
as a study room for those who desire to use it as 
such. Students who room outside the college will 
appreciate this. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



31 



— The F'resliinan class colors are gold and brown. 

— Fifty new hymn books have been placed in the 
new chapel. 

— The Glee Club was photographed by Schillaire 
last Saturday. 

— L. F. Clark, '97, is a member of the College 
Shakespearean Club. 

— Saturday morning demerits are making their 
appearance on the bulletin board. 

— The infantry squad has been having very inter- 
esting exercises in the extended order drill. 

— A committee of citizens has been appointed to 
look after the interests of the Union Lecture Course 
this winter. 

—Prof, and Mrs. Cooley have returned from 
their carriage drive and are now at home at the 
farm house. 

— Friday afternoon seems to be the popular time 
for tramiis through the woods. Those who are 
willing to brave the October gales for chestnuts 
always return successful. 

— President Goodell has been sufTering from quita 
a severe illness the past week, but is now on the 
road to recovery. He is spending a few days with 
friends in New London, Conn. 

— Billings, '95, and Kuroda, '95, have been 
elected to represent the college Y. M. C. A. at 
the annual convention of the associations of Massa- 
chusetts and Rhode Island, to be held at Fitchburg 
Oct. 18-25 inclusive. 

— The class of Ninety-seven has elected the fol- 
lowing officers for the term : President, C. I. Goess- 
mann ; vice-president, A. C. Birnie ; secretary, H. 
C. Hunter ; treasurer, F. W. Colby ; captain, C. A. 
King ; historian, A. C. Birnie ; sergeant-at-arms, 
A. H. Fittz ; foot-ball manager, L. M. Huntress. 

— A special meeting of the board of Trustees was 
held at Boston Oct. 7. Necessary action was taken 
in the giving of bonds to the United States govern- 
ment for the loan of new ordnance and ordnance 
stores. The report of the President for the nine 
months ending Sept. 30, 1893, was presented and 
adopted as the report of the Board to the Legisla- 
ture. This action was due to recent legislative 
enactments requiring the report to be submitted in 
October instead of in January as formerly. 



— H. J. Armstrong, '97, is a member of Phi Sig- 
ma Kappa. 

— Improvements are in progress at the upper 
plant-house. 

— B. K. Jones, '96, was called home quite sud- 
denly last week by the death of a relative. 

— Professors Goessmann, Paige and Brooks are 
absent from college attending the Exposition at 
Chicago. 

— A number of students attended the meeting of 
local grange No. 16, P. of H., Oct. 6, and report 
a pleasant time. 

— The tennis tournament is slowly progressing, 
still we believe the interest in this department of 
college sport might be greater. 

— At a meeting of the Senior editors held Octo- 
ber 16, R. A. Cooley, '95, was elected to fill the vacan- 
cy existing on the Aggie Life board. 

— The Freshman class has elected the following 
directors of the College associations : Polo, E. A. 
Bagg ; base-ball, C.I. Goessmann ; foot-hall, L. M. 
Huntress ; athletic, L. M. Huntress ; tennis, A. M. 
Nowell ; reading-room, L. F. Clark. 

—At a meeting of the W. I. L. S. held Oct. 11, 
the following ofBcers were elected : president, D. C. 
Potter, '95 ; vice-president, C. H. Spaulding, '94 ; 
secretary, W. L. Pentecost, '96 ; treasurer, H. P. 
Smead, '94 ; directors, S.F.Howard, '94, C. B. 
Lane, '95, A. S. Kinney, '96. Ten new members 
were voted into the society. 

— The Washington Irving society will meet next 
Friday night in the "section" room at the drill-hall 
and will debate the following question: "Resolved, 
that the two years' men should be allowed to enter 
athletic sports with the Freshmen. Curtis, Spaulding, 
and Fittz will speak on the affirmative and Gifford, 
Howard and Leamy on the negative. As this is a 
question of general interest it is hoped that the 
meeting will be largely attended. All members of 
the college are invited. 



The W. P. I. of Worcester again comes to our 
table and is warmly welcomed. It is a newsy paper 
dealing but little in purely literary contributions. We 
are glad to note after thorough perusal of the first 
issue of the year, that the institution and its asso- 
ciations are prospering. 



32 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE JUNIOR TRIP. 

On the morning of Oct. 5th, the Junior class left 
college for the annual tour of observation through 
some of the celebrated eastern vineyards and market 
gardens of the state ; the complete success of the 
trip is ascribed to the thoughtful care of Professor 
Maynard, who was in command. 

The class went via the Central R. R. to Oakdale, 
thence to Fitchburg, there visiting the vineyards of 
Dr. Fisher and Mr. Andrews. Dr. Fisher's place 
is a model of thrift, system and neatness ; the grapes, 
all Concords, were scarcely ripe, and the vines each 
trained like every other hung loaded with the 
luscious fruit. The Doctor seemed pleased at the 
compliment implied by the visit and from him the 
class received many valuable suggestions on the care 
and management of fruits. Mr. Andrew's vineyard 
is well situated and is loaded with delicious fruit : 
Concords, Wordens and Delawares, though evidently 
as much time was not bestowed on their care. 
From Fitchburg the class went to Boston and 
devoted the afternoon to the exhibit of flowers, 
fruits and vegetables in Horticultural Hall. The 
exhibit was of course one of the finest to be seen in 
the country. The managers showed Professor May- 
nard and the class every attention and if anj' mem- 
ber failed to add to his stock of horticultural lore it 
was his own fault. Breaking ranks here some re- 
mained to view the gas light attractions of Boston, 
but most found friends and passed the night in the 
suburbs. 

Friday morning, Mr. W. W. Rawson of Arling- 
ton, the celebrated market gardener, took the class 
through his extensive grounds and enormous green- 
houses courteously answering the numerous ques- 
tions with which he was plied. Here all embarked 
in a four horse conveyance and rode through the 
beautiful towns of Belmont and Watertown (the 
latter also historic) in sight of the U. S. Arsenal, 
stopping briefly at the large fruit farm and green- 
house of Messrs. Hittinger Bros, and arriving at 
West Newton about 1 o'clock. There Mr. E. W. 
Wood, one of the Trustees of the College, invited the 
party to his house to lunch and entertained the 
boys most royally. 

The distance from Mr. Wood's house to the West 
Newton station B. & A. R. R. about one-fourth of 
a mile the class made on foot in three minutes to 



catch a train for Wellesley and it is needless to say 
that the scrub race by which this was accomplished 
created a sensation as well as commotion in the 
quiet aristocratic town. 

At Wellesley the well-known Huunewell estate 
was visited, where the class was much interested in 
the rare shrubbery and landscape effects, especially 
at the celebrated Italian garden overlooking the 
lake. Thence through the extensive grounds of 
Wellesley College obtaining a good view of the 
buildings, and what seemed to interest '95 more, a 
number of the students. At the Wellesley station 
the official trip ended, and the class separated, 
most of the members not returning to College till 
Sunday night. 

D. c. p. 



vjmna. 



'71. — E. A. Ellsworth is the Republican candi- 
date for County Commissioner from Hampshire. 

'82. — Dr. W. E. Stone was chairman of the Sec- 
tion of Didactic Chemistry of the World's Congress 
of Chemists recently held at Chicago. His opening 
address before the section was upon the subject of 
"The Relation between Teaching and Research in 
Chemistry." 

'82. — Born, Sept. 25, a son to Dr. and Mrs. W. 
E. Stone at Lafayette, Ind. 

'82. — Prof. J. B. Paige and wife of this town are 
spending a few weeks at Chicago, 111. 

'83. — S. M. Holman, Jr., of Attleboro, Mass., 
formerly quartermaster of the 3d Regiment, Uni- 
form Rank, K. of P., Massachusetts Brigade has 
been elected major in the above regiment. 

'83. — C. W. Miuott is in the employ of the Gypsy 
Moth Committee of the State Board of Agriculture. 

Ex-'87.— Born,a son, Oct. 13, to Mr. and Mrs. F. 
S. Clark at Lowell, Mass. 

'88. — The marriage, at Ashlield, of Miss Grace 
C. Smith and F. S. Cooley, assistant professor of 
agriculture at this college, took place at the home 
of the bride^ Oct. 4. The ceremony was performed 
by Rev. C. B. F. Pease of Ashfleld, assisted by 
Rev. Mr. Gaylord of North Amherst. The house 
was beautifully decorated, the bride and groom 
standing under a beautiful arch ot flowers, vines, and 



AGGIE LIFE. 



33 



autumn leaves. Miss Laura Kidder, of Northamp- 
ton, played tlie wedding march which was composed 
by Prof. Gow of Smith College. The bride was 
graduated from Smith College last June. Prof, and 
Mrs. Cooley will make their home in Amherst. 

'90. — Born, Oct 5, a daughter to N.L. Whitcomb, 
ex-'90 and wife, Littleton, Mass. 

'90.— Prof. J. S. West of Belchertown, Mass, 
will enter Moody's Bible School at Chicago, 111. 

'90. — F. J. Smith very ably presided at the Am- 
herst C. E. Local Union held at the Baptist Church, 
Amherst, last Wednesday evening. 

'91. — The address of A. G. Eames, who gradu- 
ated from Cornell University last June, is North 
Wilmington, Mass. 

'9L — M. A. Carpenter, assistant horticnlturalist 
at the Hatch Station, is spending his vacation at 
the World's Columbian Exposition. 

'91. — F. L. Arnold, assistant chemist at the State 
Experiment Station has been spending his vacation 
at his home, Belchertown, and also at Bay View. 

'92. — J. B. Knight, recently of Cannobie Lake, 
N. H., has been visiting college during the past 
week. His present address is Belchertown, Mass. 

'93. — The announcement made in several papers 
that J. Baker had been appointed superintendent in 
place of Prof. Cooley at the M. A. C. farm is in- 
correct. 

'93. — G. F. Curley, ex-editor-in-chief of Life, 
has entered the Jefferson Medical College at Phila- 
delphia, Penn. His address is 417 Spruce St. of 
that city. 

'94. — G. O. Sanford, ex-'94, has been elected 
Sec. and Treas. of the Worcester Polytechnic In- 
stitute Tennis Association. He also takes a prin- 
cipal part in the singing in the festival chorus now 
in progress. 

'96. — Shurtleff, ex-'96, has entered the junior 
class at the Howard Medical college, Washington, 
D. C. 



^cnar^ge. 



Both Harvard and the Univ.' of Penn. are again 
jubilant. Agreement has been signed for the two 
institutions to meet upon the foot-ball field for two 
years. 



Reports seem to indicate that the recent Williams 
College Centennial was far more of a success than 
was anticipated. 

The S. U. I- Quill contains a very neat and 
praiseworthy article from the pen of one of its fair 
sex, entitled "Our Girls in Athletics." 

Yale has started another reform in foot-ball. Her 
team this year will use rubber foot-ball spikes in 
place of the deadly leather articles previously used. 

The Phoenixian of Earlham still keeps up its re- 
putation. The Life congratulates the editors on 
being so fortunate as to have such a thriving mar- 
riage column. 

The William's Weekly's Stroller is out again with 
full force, and in his peculiar vein of sarcasm contri- 
butes much advice to the student body. Foot-ball 
prospects are good. 

Smith College, after years of hard endeavor, has 
at last been granted by the Faculty, permission to 
publish a paper to represent the institution. We 
wish them success, but are skeptical as to the chance 
of the paper flourishing under the Facultj' restric- 
tions, which appear as numerous as the sands of the 
seashore. 

The maid, with a smile tliat enhanced her charms, 

Observed to her beau one day : 
"There are many men with big, strong arms 

Who never need work for pay!" 

He replied, as he gazed in her eyes deep blue 

And her slender form embraced : 
" 'Tis true, and mine having no work to do 

Of course must go to waist." — Ex. 

The Polytechnic of Brooklyn, N. Y. appears with 
a very artistic frontis page, on which the Board of 
Editors and Contents are tastefully surrounded by a 
rough cut, a feature seen in but few p ublications. 
The paper is in itself a feature, abounding in liter- 
ary contributions and having its few news items in 
a half-comic style. Its usual poetical absurdities 
are greatly missed. 

Slowly but surely are the exchanges filling the 
editor's table. It is interesting to note how quickly 
the first issues arrive after the various institutions 
have opened their doors for the work of the new 



34 



AGGIE LIFE. 



year. Perhaps the most noticeable feature of recent 
arrivals are the reports of uumerous literary societies 
which seem to flourish in our colleges, especially in 
those of the West. In this distinction, the editor 
can but see the one superiority of institutions of 
the west over those of the east. There seems to be 
a scarcity of literary clubs and associations near the 
Atlantic coast while in the central district and 
westerly, the advancement of literature by student 
movement seems to have greatly developed. 



NOTICES. 

Tlie President will be at his office at the library from 
2 to 4 every afternoon except Saturday and Sunday. 

The treasurer will be at his office at the Botanic 
Museum from i to 5-30 p. M. on Wednesdays and on Sat- 
urdays from 3 to 5-30 P. M. 

The college library will be open for tlie drawing of 
books from 2 to 4 p. M. and from 6-30 to 8 P. M. every 
day in the week except Saturday and Sunday; on Satur- 
day from 8 A. M. to 12 M., from 1 to 4 p. M. and from 6-30 
to 8 p. M. ; on Sunday from 12 M. to 3 P. M, for reference 
only. 

Amherst College library will be open from 8-45 a. m. to 
6 p. M. and from 6-30 to 9-30 P. M. except on Sundays and 
the holidays. M. A. C. students may receive the privi- 
lege of using this library by applying to Pres. Goodell. 

The Zoological Museum will be open to visitors from 1 
to 3 p. M. every day but Saturday and Sunday. 

Mails are taken from the box in North College at 1.00 
p. M. and 7-35 p. m. week-days, and at 4.40 p. m. on Sun- 
days. 

Trains leave Amherst as follows :— N. L. N. R. R. ; North— 9.22 a. 
M., 11.44 A. M., 8.41 P.M. South— 7.05 A. M., 12.14 p.m., 5.59 p.m. 
C. M. R. R. East— 5.23 A. M., 6.09 A. M„ 8.20 A. M., 2.40 P. M., 7.20 P. 
M. "West— 8.01 A. M., 10.30 A. M., 11.36 A. M., 1.20 p. M., 5.14 p. M., 6.15 
p. M., 7.20 p. m., 9.37 P. M. Sunday, East— 5.23 A. M., 6.10 A. m. 
West— 5.29 P. M., 9.37 p. M. 



OLIVER D. HUNT, 



• DEALER nf - 






j^ 



ALSO FIRE INSURANCE AGENT. 

;^=-Okdeks received at Hunt's Stove STORE.^ffia' 



as SCHOOL ST., BOSTON, 

Designed and engraved the title page of this book. 
You have seen his work in the college publications 
of Bates, Beloit, Bowdoin, Colby, Mass. Agr'l Col- 
lege, Tufts, Wellesley and Yale. 
.^»He will submit you rough sketches and samples free. 



^i^Ciito's Doiestic Bakery^^ 

You will find the largest and best selected stock of Candy 
in town. Call and see for yourself. The price wiU please 
you. 

5 PHOENIX ROW, AMHERST. 

M. N. SPEAK. 

, stalier 

WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 

AMHERST, MASS. 

DEALER IN 

NEW AND SECOND-HAND BICYCLES. 
13 Phoenix Row, . - . . Amherst, Mass. 

LIA^ERY STABLE. 

SINGLE TEAMS TO LET AT EAIR PRICES. 

Pleasant St., Amherst. 

Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 

ilies. 

juuu s are Ours." 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, A.MHEJtST, MASS. 




Schillare's 
Photographic Studio. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 

108 MAIN STUEJET, - NOBTMAMPTON, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



35 



FOUMTAIM PEMS. 



BOTAMY OUTFITS 



SEYMOUR, WIRT, SWANS and the UNIVERSITY 

FOUNTAIN PEN which is selUng for only $1.50. 

All pens warranted to work WELL or 

money refunded. 



Jk'3^ 1301:"1^0 



IF^I^IOEX^. 



Honest Goods. 



GUM PAPER, LENSES, HERBARIUM SLIPS, 
BOTANY PRESSES, &c. 

^ I'i^.l" I O J^ K :K ^^5 

NOTE BOOKS OF ALL KINDS AND SIZES, PAPER, 

WHITE GLOVES, ATHLETIC GOODS, &c. 

i^'Prices Low. [[^^Satisfaction Guaranteed. 






M. A. C, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY, FEED i SALE STABLI 

T. L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

JLMBHRST, MASS. 



DEALER IN 



'1 



FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

FIME STB,TIQMEMY. 
REPAIRINS NEATLY km PROMPTLY OQ^JE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



H, 0. PEfigE 




j^3ytia:EE,s T , 



3VC.A.SS. 




A High Grade 
Wheel for a lit- 
tle money. 

SolidJire, $85. 
CusliioiiTii'e,$90. 
Pneumatic 
Tire, $115. 

Send for^Catalogue. 



FOl *,ALt. Bl 

I« C3« C3-B:\s.jj:v-«cv-'-Ni--io.'9 
4^A11 correspondence will receive prompt attention.'=t3& 



COLLEGE AGENT FOR 



TALE FOUNTAII^ PEl^. 



STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, GUM PAPER, 
WHITE GLOVES, COLLEGE BUTTONS, 
COLLEGE PAPER, A No. 1 CON- 
FECTIONERY, LUNCH 
COOKIES, ETC. 



13 SOUTH COLLEiaE:. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 



and Carpet Reiiovatiii Establisliment 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE : 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



36 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes I Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Slieet ]VIi2sic, 



JVlusic Books, 



Strings 

FOR the: violin, banjo, ouixar, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 

JLMBERST AND NORTHAMPTON. 



Hair Dressing Rooms 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEUF 

AMHERST, MASS. 



.« DENTISTS. 5), 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
E. N. BROWN, D. D. S. 

CtrTXJBIt'S BI^OCK, AMBEJtST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
s -A., iv^. TO s F. :^/E. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. R. BENNETT, 



Jeweler, Opticiaii, latcliialer. 



f^ 



FINE GOODS. LOW PRICES. 

GOOD WOUK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-office. 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOIEET ARTICLES, 

CHOICE CONFECTIONERY, BEST ICE CREAM AND 

SODA WATER, VIOLIN, GUITAR AND 

BANJO STRINGS, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO and SMOKERS' SUPPLIES. 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIAZTT AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your ©@,^S here. 



WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNISHING GOODS 



BLODGETT & CLARK' 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



Far Bnits and Fall Oversoata 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



FINE ITAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS 



B. & H. ANT) ROCHESTER, $1.00 UP. VERT HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, §1.50, $2.00 and $2.50. 
For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 

O. G. COIJCM & SON'S. 
FRANK C. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Pariseaij, 

HAIB I^RESBIMO- ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED. 

Amherst House Anndx Amherst, Mass. 

office of 
E. A. THOMAS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherstf Mass, 



H 



TOILET fi^TIgLEg, 



A FINE LINE OP 



SMOKING TOBACCO, PIPES, &c., 
CIGARS AND CIGARETTES. 



'S DRUG STORE, 

Amtierst House Block, - Amlierst, Mass. 






NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 



■GO TO - 



1893. 



mm PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Class and Group Ulopk a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



^. g. DI(?HI(550(^, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



^*"Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



.A.T THE 



AMHERST GASH SHGEi STGREi 

Ton can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSOJST, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



A. GLYNN, 



/ 



4TAI LO R 



Repairing Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



THE 

/Iftassacbusctts 

Hgricultural 

College 

1. A TWO YEARS' eOURSlS in Agriculture and kindred 
sciences. 

2. A FOUR VEi^RS' COURSE, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. Eleven courses of study are provided Senior year, nine 
of which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Chemistry, Ento- 
mology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves in the 
higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study. 
English and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST GRADUATE COURSE of two years lead- 
ing to the degree of Master of Science. Residence at the college not 
required. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President. 



po^^ . yp^j^ r^>^^/c^ 



m<v 




X?o-Hv< 



.y\^. 



-Kkvc&K 



>1ASS. 



ST, 



Nov. 1, 1893. 



h> 



i<^ i^fii 



es) 



'•^f''"f< 



L 






'wm 



VOL. IV. 



NO. 4. 




^d>.rp^n^r 5t MorfKousf . 



.eRlNTERS, 



« 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS, AGRICULTUR/iL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEKST, MASS. 

We would inform the frieuds of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply in lim- 
ited quantities, 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL FRUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plaats, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address. 



Prof. S. T. Maynard, 



AMHERST. MASS. 




THE AMHERST 

PP >ND CABPE 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES. ALLOWS, STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS. LOUNGES- 
WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC, 



All Goods STRICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 



sj^~^:e: is^oiste's- b~z" g-oiistg to 

C. H. SANDERSON k CO., 



Slits, Ulstefs, Sweaters, Hals, Gaps, Gte 

AND MITTENS. 

Suits made to order, - .§13 to §35. 
Trousers made to order, 3 to 10. 
Overcoats made to order, 10 to 3.5. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



x:. F'lSTi'r'js 



Dfll^GIfiG SCHOOLi 

WILL RE-OPEN OCT. 2. 

Do not wait until spring term and then crowd 2 or 3 hours a week, 
but start in October and take your time. Receptions, to members of 
the school only, last Wednesday of each month from 8 till 10-30. 

Will ue at Pacific HALLCCook's Blk) Wednesdays from 7-30 to 8 30. 



EDWIN NELSON, 
Bookseller and Stationer, 

COLLEGE TEXT-BOOKS, NEW AND SECOND HAND. 
No. 3, Post Office Block, Amherst. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 



FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STDDENTS'^ 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A EULL LINE OF 

IRTJBBEIK <3-00:DS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



JS^Kepnifijtg dove, tehUe you wait,.:^^ 

T. W. SLOAN, 

s rs(Einx MOW. 

S. A. PHILLIPS, 

Praetkal Elarriber, 

STEAH AND GAS FITTER. 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



A Large Stock of Ranges, Heating Stoves, Tin 
Ware, &c. Hot Air Furnace Heating, also 

Steam and Hot Water Heatins a Specialty. 



AGGIE LIFE 



VOL. IV. 



AMHERST, MASS., NOVEMBER 1, 1893. 



No. 4 





AGGIE 


LIFE. 






Published 


Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 


Terms $1,00 


per jear, in advance. 


Single copies, 


lOc. 


Entered at the Post Office as 


second-class mail matter. 





BOARD OF EDITORS : 

C. p. WALKEE, '94, Editor-in-chief. 

G. H. MEEWIN, '94, Business Manager. 

T. S. BACON, '94, T. P. KEITH, '94, 

P. L. GREENE, '94, T. P. FOLEY, '95, 

C. B. LANE, '95, R. A. COOLEY, '95, 

R. L. HAYWARD, '96. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communica- 
tions should be addressed Aggie Life, Amherst Mass. 



Ed i-to rials. 



The members of the Western Alumni Association 
are to be congratulated upon the success of their 
meeting held so recently at Chicago. Judging from 
reports it is the most successful ever held 
by them and reflects great credit upon the Associa- 
tion. The love that they bear for their Alma Mater 
must be strong in each heart to enable members so 
distant from college to be so much interested in the 
welfare of the institution. And furthermore many 
of the members of the association reside hundreds 
of miles from the home office of the association at 
Chicago and yet we never hear of anj' one of them 
sufficiently Lacking in interest to fail to attend 
any of the meetings. The good accomplished by this 
association for our college cannot be over-estimated 
as it serves not only to keep alive their interest in 
the institution but also to mterest others and bring 
the college more prominently before the classical 
people in that section of the country. 



The study of English has recently been the sub- 
ject of quite extended discussion. It is claimed by 



prominent educators that the present methods of 
teaching this most important branch of knowledge 
are defective and inefficient. Certain it is that the 
average grammar school graduate is unable to ex- 
press his ideas correctly and forcibly in written 
language, and also is it true that many of the grad- 
uates of our higher schools and colleges are lament- 
ably deficient in this respect. One reason for the 
lack of power of expression is the carelessness of 
teachers in regard to recitations. Every student 
should be required to present answers to questions 
in correct English. Accurate definition implies an 
exact and forceful use of words. When this power 
of definition has been obtained, two of the most 
important qualities of style, precision and force, 
have been acquired. The habit of definiteness in 
speech cannot fail to promote readier, easier, and 
stronger expression in written work. The import- 
ance of a thorough working knowledge of our mother 
tongue is too self evident to need exposition. Any 
means or method which will aid in the acquirement 
of ability to speak or write concisely and effectively 
should receive careful consideration. 



"Students and Alumni are requested to contribute." 
The above notice may be seen in every issue of 
the Life, occupying a prominent position on the 
first page but not obtruding itself too forcibly upon 
the notice of the parties whom it concerns. We 
would think that there must be something wrong 
with the address if we were to judge by the number 
of articles that reach us from the Alumni. While 
we do not expect that every man that graduates can 
find time to contribute to the college paper we cer- 
tainly have a right to expect some literary support 
from at least one or two of each class. But when 
these fail to materialize we must endeavor to 
find an explanation for the apparent indiflTerence 
along some other line than lack of time. It would 



38 



AGGIE LIFE. 



seem to the casual observer as if writing for the col- 
lege paper would be a sort of recreation for a briefed 
and cliented lawyer, and positive enjoyment to a 
hard-worked doctor with his nostrums and poultices. 
And when we consider the breadth of Jiuowledge 
and practicability of advice which our graduates 
should be able to give us we can but wonder how 
they are able to refrain from pointing out the nar- 
row pathway to success. But few such pointers 
have we seen. We must conclude that our Alumni 
are either too busy to write or that the college paper 
is forarotten in the mad race for wealth and fame. 



It is with pleasure that we welcome to our 
exchange table, from time to time, publications from 
ouv sister agricultural colleges. A large number of 
these institutions maintain regularly published col 
lege journals which uphold the interests that are 
common to all colleges of Agriculture and the 
Mechanic Arts. These institutions are established 
and maintained by the same government enactment ; 
their courses of undergraduate and post-graduate 
study are very similar as are also the aims and 
objects of their organization. They each maintain 
a military department which is one of many charac- 
teristics that distinguishes the state college from the 
many well-known classical and scientific institutions 
supported by private endowment. On the fatigue 
caps worn by the cadets of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College are inscribed the letters "M. A. C." 
This same legem! is to be found on the uniforms of 
the students of at least three other agricultural col- 
leges. All these things emphasize the fact that 
between the thirty or more colleges founded under 
the provisions of the Morrill bill, there is a relation 
which could not exist between other classical or sci- 
entific colleges. The presidents of these institutions 
have recognized this fact and long since organ- 
ized the "Association of American Agricultural Col- 
leges and Experiment Stations." Col. Hughes of 
the U. S. Army recommends that arrangements 
by the military instructors be made to meet for cou 
ference, and thus advance the interests of the mili- 
tary department of all the state " colleges. Why 
cannot some means be provided for a closer rela- 
tion between the students of these institutions? 
Although there are many obstacles in the way 
it seems as if more might be done in this direc- 



tion than has been in the past. Let us embrace 
every opportunity that offers itself for "getting 
acquainted" that by a free interchange of ideas 
among the students we may do still more for the 
advancement of the agricultural colleges of our 
country. 



^f^s i°fefm|. 



FOOT-BALL. 
M. A.. C, 38; WiLLiSTON, 0. 

Williston was defeated in a hard fought contest 
at Easthampton, the 18th, by the score of 38-0. 
This was the first game which Aggie has won this 
year, the result being quite a surprise to all, and 
far above the general expectations. A large dele- 
gation of students accompanied the team, and 
cheered them on to their first victory. The Willis- 
ton team was somewhat the heavier, and made their 
few gains principally through the lines, being unable 
to successfully circle our ends. 

In the first ±alf, Williston worked up to within 
ten yards of the Aggie line, but lost the ball on 
Durgin's fumble. Likewise in the last half the ball 
was within a yard of the Aggie line when it was lost 
by a fumble by Winne. These were the only times 
that the Aggie territory was invaded. Aggie did 
very little center work, making all her long gains 
asound the Williston ends. Several times long 
sprints were made by the Aggie backs, only to lose 
the ball on alleged off-side play. Twice Mauley 
took the leather and ran the length of the field, 
scoring, amidst the huzzas of Aggie and the dismay 
of their opponents. Marshall and Bagg also did 
fine work. The only criticism of Aggie's work was 
the continual unnecessary fumbling which although 
it lost but little, was very risky to say the least. 
For Williston, Gait, Carpenter and Bartlett did the 
best work, while the ends did quite noticeable work, 
but were at the mercy of the Aggie blockers. The 
score at the end of the first half was 14-0 

The teams lined up as follows : 

M. A. c. 
Marsh, 
Fairbanks, 
Burriugton, 
Smith, 
Boardman, 
Higgins, 



left end, right, 
left tackle, right, 
left guard, right, 

center, 
right guard, left, 
right tackle, left, 



WILLISTON. 

Van Winkle 

Corsa 

May her 

Pomeroy 

Mossman 

Durgin 



AGGIE LIFE. 



39 



Mauley, right end, left, Comstock 

Putnam, quarter-back, Carpenter 

Gifford, ] ,,,,., (^"'tr.r 

y half-backs, ■{ Bartlett 

Marshall, j ( Winue 

Bagg, full-back. Gait (Capt.) 

Referee — Fowler '94, M. A. C. tTinpire — Prof. Leach, 

Willistou. Touchdowns — Gifford 3, Bagg, Manley 3. 

Goals — Smith 5. Time — Thirty minute halves. 

Yale Freshman, 16 ; M. A. C, 0. 

The college team were defeated by Yale '97 in a 
very interesting game, the 21st inst. Aggie was 
somewiiat weakened by tlie absence of Capt. Gifford 
and Putnam, from behind the line. Aggie had the 
kick-off, and tried the flying V. For 20 yards 
Marshall earned the ball, but he then lost it to Yale. 
Aggie held them in their places for three downs, 
and Yale was compelled to punt, Hickey slipped 
down the field, took in the pig-skin, and scored a 
touclidown. Twitchell kicked a goal. The Aggie 
V netted 15 yards, and tiiey worked to Yale's 15 
yard line, when they lost on four downs. Yale imme- 
diately sprinted the field for a touchdown, but 
fuml)led on Aggie's goal line and Manley dropped 
on the ball, scoring a touch-back. 

The second half, Yale made 15 yards on kick-oflf 
and worked slowly to Aggie's line, but before down 
was called by Yale, Marsh secures the ball and 
sprints the length of the field, scoring a touchdown 
for Aggie which was not allowed on account of 
alleged holding. The teams lined up on the 25 yard 
line and Simners was soon pushed over and a goal 
kicked. Aggie started off with 15 yards, but soon 
lost the ball and Simners again scored, but failed at 
goal. The features of the game were the work of 
Marsh, Manley and Shaw, for Aggie, and that of 
Simners and Twitchell of Yale. The blocking of 
Yale was very good, but her backs could not keep 
their feet. The Yale line held so well however that 
Aggie was unable to grasp the opportunity offered. 

The line up : 

Yale '97. 
Hlnkley, 
Miller, 
Sturgis, 
Twitchell, 
Mabie, 
Putnam, 
Prichott, Jones, 
Finche, 
Simners, \ 
Judd, / 
Twitchell, 



right end, left, 
right tackle, left, 
right guard, left, 

center, 

left guard, right, 

left tackle, right, 

left end, right, 

quarter-back, 

half-backs, 

full-back, 



M. A. C. 
Warren, Shaw 
Fairbanks 
Burrington 
Smith 
Boardman 
Higgins 
Manley 
Putnam 
j Palmer, 
1 Marshall 



Umpire — Mr. Cox of Yale. Referee — Fowler of M. A. 
C. Touchdowns — Hinkey, Simmers 2. Goals — Twitchell 2 
Time — Twenty minute halves. 

Mt. Hermon, 54; M. A. C, 0. 

The college team for the second time this season 
was defeated at Northfield by the Mt. Hermon 
eleven. Aggie did not succeed in scoring, or hardly 
approaching their opponent's goal, while the Her- 
monites piled up fifty-four points — -eleven touch- 
downs and five goals. The Hermon team was the 
strongest and most beefy team Aggie has met this 
year. By weight alone they would break the Aggie 
rush line and send her backs for long runs, several 
times nearly the length of the field. 

The score at the end of the first half was 20-0. 
Aggie opened the game with Deland V, but Hermon 
had no trouble in stopping it with little gain. Aggie 
lost the ball on four downs and the Hermonites with 
a fifty-yard end play sent Fulton for a touchdown 
and goal. In this manner the half continued, Aggie 
starting only to lose on downs, and Hermon imme- 
diately scoring b}- gains through all positions on the 
line. 

In the second half Hermon tries a new start and 
has no difficulty in making twenty yards. Morell 
is sent through tackle and soon had a touchdown. 
For the greater part of the game gains were made 
through the Aggie tackles without trouble. The only 
feature of the game was the superb blocking of Mt. 
Hermon. When once started her runners had the 
whole protection of their blockers. Putnam's was 
the best feature of the Aggie game. 

The teams lined up as follows : 

MT. HERMON. M. A. C. 

Johnson, right end, left. Marsh 

Camp, right tackle, left, Fairbanks 

Stone, right guard, left, Burrington 

Lotz, center, Smith 

Cluz, left guard, right, Boardman 

Cornell, left tackle, right, Higgins 

MoreU, left end, right, Manley 

Hall, quarter-back, Putnam 

=:;•} ^alf-backs. {^^ 

MacDongold, full-back, Bagg, Toole 

Referee— Fowler '91, M. A. C. Umpire— Dans, Green- 
field. Touchdovrns — Fulton 5, Morrell 3, Johnson 2, 
Hatch. Goals — Fulton 5. Time -Thirty-minute halves. 
Springfield Training School, 18; M. A. C, 6. 
Last Saturday the college team, in twenty-minute 
halves, was defeated by the eleven from the Young 



40 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Men's Christian Association Training Scliool by the 
score of 18 to 6. Springfleld very much outweighed 
Aggie, but what the latter laclied in weiglit was 
gained in agility and science. The home team 
labored under great disadvantages, three of her 
players being substitutes, two of whom played their 
first foot-ball game ; besides this the knowledge of 
our team's plays by Springfield enabled them to 
come prepared for good work. The game, as a 
whole, was the best seen on the campus this year. 
As always in the past, the Training School played a 
very gentlemanly game, but full of science, and 
Aggie returned the compliment with interest. 

In the first half Springfield secured two touch- 
downs and goals, one by McKee and one by Ruggles. 
Foster kicked the goals. Meanwhile Aggie failed 
to score, but just managed to keep Springfield away 
from her line umil the call of time. In the second 
half Aggie, as usual, made a large gain by her 
Deland V, but soon lo.-t the ball and McKee was 
pushed over for the final Springfield touchdown 
Foster kicked tlie goal. Aggie in a short time, by 
means of a very peculiar criss-cross, sent Marsh 
around the right end for fifty yards and a touch- 
down. GifTord neatly kicked the goal. For the 
remainder of the game the ball was kept near the 
center of the field. Marsh and Mauley carried ofT 
the Aggie honors, while Page and McKee did well 
for Springfield. 

The teams were lined up as follows : 

S. T. M. C. A. M. A. C. 

Durand, Lutz, right end, left, Marsh 

Kinnicutt, right tackle, left, Fairbanks 

Gabler, right guard, left, Burringtoii 

Denman, center. Cutter 

Allen, left guard, right, Boardman 

Ruggles, ^ left tackle, right, Higgins 

Boss, left end, right. Mauley, Shaw 

Carey, quarter-back, Putnam 

l^'^'Z' \ half-backs, 1^**^°';^, 

McKee, / ' \ Marshall 

Page, full-back, Crehore, Bagg 

Referee — Mr. J. Naisnaith, Springfield. Umpire — Mr. 

Fowler, M.A.C. Touchdowns — Marsh, McKee2, Ruggles 

Goals — Gifibrd, Foster 3. Time — twenty-minute halves. 

Amherst High School, 4 ; Ninety-Seven, 0. 

The Freshman eleven last Saturday for the second 

time this fall met the Amherst High School team on 

Blake field and were questionably defeated by the 

close score of 4-0. 



Throughout the game the Freshmen played the 
best game, keeping their opponents near the center 
of the field or pushing their own team very close to 
Amherst's goal. By an unfortunate fumble in the 
first half Emerson of Amherst secured the ball and 
ran the length of the field, making the only touch- 
down. The game was scheduled to take place on 
Pratt Field, but Aggie was compelled to play on 
another field, without lines or goal posts, and the 
referee and umpire had to make the best of the cir- 
cumstances. Stackman, Amherst High School was 
umpire and Keith '94, M. A. C, was referee. 

Ninety-Seven, 12; Hopkins Academy, 0. 

The Freshman eleven in two hotly contested twen- 
ty-minute halves, on the campus last Wednesday, 
defeated the Academy boys 12-0. The game was 
quite spirited throughout. Neither eleven scored 
during the first half, but the Freshmen had the ball 
on Hopkins' three-yard line at the close of the half. 
Hall and Barclay played in fine form for Aggie, and 
Capt. Smith for Hopkins. 

The line-up was as follows : 

HOPKINS ACADEMY. NINETY-SEVEN. 

Peilisser, right end, left, Howe 

Dougan, right tackle, left, Eddy 

Cook, right guard, left, Vaughn 

Barry, center, Birnie 

Reynolds. left guard, right. King (capt.) 

Richardson, left tackle, right. Huntress 

F. Bonney, left end, right, C. J. King 

Lane, quarter-back, Emrlch 

Bonney, 1 balf-harks / ^^^^ 

Smith, / ^^^^ °*'='"®' 1 Barclay 

Baine, full-ball, Goessmann 

Referee— T. F. Keith '94, M. A. C. Umpire— Thompson, 

Hopkins Academy. Touchdowns — Barclay 2. Goals — 

Hall 2. Time — twenty-minute halves. 



In olden times the loveloi-n youth, 

Who held life not worth living, 
"Would plunge a dagger into his heart 

And die, his love forgiving. 
The modern youth, who soured by love, 

Seeks shorter paths to heaven. 
He sweater dons, eats raw beefsteak. 

And joins the foot-ball 'leven. — Ex. 

Stagg, the great Yale player has written a treatise 
on American Foot-Ball. 



Leland Stanford Junior University desires to be 
called hereafter simply Stanford University. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



41 



W. I. L. S. 

The first meeting of the W. I. for debate was 
held Oct. 20, over sixty members of the college 
being present. Tobey was appointed critic and 
Kinney extemporaneous speaker. The question for 
debate was : Resolved, that the two-years men 
should be allowed to enter athletic sports with 
the Freshmen. Spaulding, Curtis and Filtz sup- 
ported the affirmative ; Gifford, Howard and Leamy 
the negative. After a lively contest the affirma- 
tive prevailed. Kinney then spoke of the Owl Club. 
At the close of the meeting a number of new men 
were voted into the Society. 

The meeting, for Oct. 27 was well attended and 
the following question was debated : Resolved, That 
fear of the tariff reform is the cause of the present 
hard times. Merwin, Roper and Barclay spoke in 
the afflimative ; Fletcher, Foley and Giflford in the 
negative. The weight of the argument was decided 
in the affirmative. Haywood gave an extempora- 
neous speech and Giflford the critic's report. 

On Nov. 3, will occur the Town Meeting as 

arranged for by the directors. All members of the 

college are invited to take part in this exercise. 

^ 

BOTANICAL LABORATORY. 

During the last few weeks workmen have been 

making changes in the botanical laboratory. A new 

bench fitted with appliances for microchemical work 

has been made while a large amount of apparatus 

for carrying on experiments with the growth of plant 

tissues has been put in. In the recitation room new 

cases for the charts have been erected. The room 

above the treasurer's office, formerly used by the 

Hatch Experiment Station, has been thoroughly 

renovated and is to be occupied by the collections of 

fungi, mosses and lichens. A card catalogue of the 

Knowlton Herbarium is to be prepared ; this will 

greatly increase its value as the specimens will be 

much more available for study. 



T. M. C. A. TOPICS. 

Nov. 2. How God is Faithful. II Thess. 3:3-5; 
I Cor. 10 : 13. E. H. Alderman. 

Nov. 5. The Friend of Friends. Prov. 18: 24; 
John 14 : 13-16. L. F. Clark. 

Nov. 9. He Humbled Himself. Phil. 2:5-13. 
A. B. Smith. 

Nov. 12. A Hope Full of Inspiration. I Cor. 1 : 
7, 8 ; Titus 2 : 13, 14. P. E. Davis. 



IN MEBIORIAM. 
The members of the Class of Ninetv-Four of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, feeling deeply 
the affliction which they have sustained in the loss 
of their beloved classmati Harry Griggs Stockwell, 
desire to expiess to all, their appreciation of his 
many sterling qualities. His genial and sunny 
nature together with a pure Christian character made 
him one who was ever devoted to the best interests 
of all and endeared him to every one with whom he 
came in contact. Our association with him in the 
class room, on the campus and in the various 
literary circles will ever be treasured in memory ; 
and although he is gone from our midst his life will 
bear fruit in an ennobling influence upon all who 
knew him. 

Dear as he wiis to us, there were others, members 
of the home circle, who felt his loving devotion far 
more deeply than we ever could and to them, in this 
time of affliction, we desire to express our tender 
and heartfelt sympathy. 

The Class of NiNETr-FouR. 

T. S. Bacon, 

A. C. Curtis, S- Committee. 

J. E. Gifford, 



IN MEMORY OF OUR BROTHER, 

HAEjRT GRIGGS STOCKWELL, 
Who died in Sutton, Oct. 18, 1893. 
M'hereas, It lias been the "will of the Heavenly Father 
to take to his sheltering care our dear friend and brother, 
Harry Griggs Stockwell, and 

Whereas, We recognize in him qualities that won the 
respect and esteem of all. Therefore be it 

Resolved, That we the members of Aleph chapter of the 
D. G. K. Fraternity do sincerely mourn his loss, and be it 
further 

Resolved, That we extend our heartfelt sympathy to his 
parents in their hour of bereavement, and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to 
the parents of our departed brother, and that copies also 
be placed on file in the Fraternity records, and be pub- 
lished in the Cycle, and in the college publication. 

H. M. Fowler, "j Committee 

Jasper Marsh, V for the 

Chas. I. Goessmann, J Society. 

Seniors at Wellesley have already adorned their 
caps and gowns and will wear them until commence- 
ment. 



42 



AGGIE LIFE. 



^olle^f ^o-t^S" 



— Freshmen uniforms arrive to-day. 

— The orchestra was photographed bj- Schillaire, 
Oct. 27. 

— Ninetj'-six vs. Ninety-seven and the first year 
men to-day. 

— Wori?men are engaged in wiring South College 
for electric lights. 

— R. W. Drury, '95, is playing right end on the 
West Point foot-ball team. 

— Vaughan, '97, has presented the museum with 
a valuable collection of bird's eggs. 

— Topic cards for the prayer meetings have been 
printed and distributed among members of the Y. 
M. C. A. 

— The senior class has placed the matter of com- 
mencement appointments in the hands of a 
committee. 

— The drawing for tickets to the Amherst college 
lecture course was held at the Town Hall Wednes- 
day afternoon. 

— Students who have been boarding at Mrs. Kel- 
logg's and Mrs. Gilbert's have been compelled to 
seek accommodations elsewhere. 

— There are 433 students now in Amherst College, 
19 2 being residents of Massachusetts, 98 from New 
York, and 18 from both Connecticut and Illinois. 

— Last Monday the companies were sized, A and 
B with the tall men on the right and C and D with 
the short men on the right, the corporals falling in 
according to height. 

— Prof. A. Backhauss, Betriebslahre, Landwritt- 
schafflishe Institute, Goettingen, Germany, visited 
the college last Friday. He has been present at the 
Columbian Exposition as a representative from Ger- 
many and has also visited the state colleges through- 
out the country. 

— The opening entertainment of the Amherst 
College lecture course was given last Saturday even- 
ing before a crowded house by the New York Phil- 
harmonic Club supported by Miss Marion S. Weed, 
Mezzo-Soprano. All lovers of good music could 
not fail to enjoy the excellent program which was 
rendered. The solos by Carl Barth on the violin- 
cello were worthy of special mention. 



— E. H. Alderman was visited by his brother last 
week. 

— Prof. Brooks returned from his visit to Chicago 
last Friday. 

— Twenty-five new Springfield rifles will soon be 
placed in the armory. 

— Rev. J. H. Vorce of Enfield occupied the col- 
lege pulpit last Sunday. 

— The D. G. K. fraternity house is being im- 
proved b}' a new coat of paint. 

— Mrs. A. C. Washburne has been unanimously 
elected secretary of the Ramona club. 

— The game with Yale '97 veas witnessed by a 
large number of spectators including many members 
of Amherst college. 

— Fire Drill was held Oct. 20. After publishing 
orders the alarm was sounded and the four com- 
panies were drilled in their respective duties. 

— The Freshmen will play football with the French 
Protestant College of Springfield on the home 
grounds Nov. 11, and with Hopkins Academy at 
Hadley, Nov. 17. 

— A party of M. A. C. students paid a short vi^it 
Oct. 21, to the Worcester county truant school at 
Oakdale and were very agreeably entertained by 
Superintendent Johnson and L. J. Shepard, ex-'94, 
who is in the employ of the institution. 

— The funeral of H. G. Stock well was held at 
Sutton Oct. 21. A. C. Curtis, C. P. Lounsbury, 
G. H. Merwin and H. P. Smead attended as dele- 
gates from Ninety-Four, while the D. G. K. frater- 
nity was represented by J. E. Giflferd, J. H. Put- 
nam, E. A. White and A. S. Kinney. 

— There was a very pleasant time at the home of 
Prof, and Mrs. Warner, last Wednesday evening, 
when they extended their hospitality to the members 
of the Glee Club and the Orchestra. Mr. Averell, 
'94, was also present and rendered several solos on 
the guitar. The company first serenaded Prof. 
Warner, and the quiet of evening was broken by the 
words of the well-known song, "Here's to Aggie 
College, "and with an appropriate verse commencing 
"Here's to Prof. Warner," composed expressly for 
the occasion. Refreshments were served during 
the evening and the time sped quickly bj' with the 
several vocal and instrumental selections. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



43 



— S. F. Howard, '94, was at his home over 
Sunday. 

—The raid-teim examiDations were held Monday 
and Tuesday. 

— Birnie, '97, and Drew, '97, are members of 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 

— The battalion will be drilled for the present in 
the School of the Company. 

— The football team was photographed by Sehil- 
laire of Northampton, Oct. 18. 

— The senior division in chemistry is about to 
commence work in quantitative anal^'sis. 

— Huntress, '97, won 300 points and a medal at 
the athletic contest lately held at Fitchburg. 

— Considerable inconvenience was occasioned 
last week bj' the shutting off of the electricity. 

— Pres. Goodell has returned to duty after his 
three weeks vacation much improved in health. 

— October 22, drill was held in the hall the first 
time this term. Companies were formed in double 
rajik. 

— A large number of students attended the exam- 
ination exercises of the "Mille Eiver Deestrick 
Skule" at North Amherst, Oct. 17. 

— R. L. Hayward, '96, who has been absent from 
college the last two months, is spending a few days 
in town. He will return to his college woik in a 
few weeks. 

— A large number of students accompanied the 
team to Easthampton, Oct. 18, to witness the game 
with Williston. Among the spectators were Profs. 
Wellington and Flint, and Dr. Lindsey of the 
station. 

—The full membership of the orchestra is as fol- 
lows : T. P. Foley, 1st violin ; T. M. Charmbury, 
2d violin ; H. M. Fowler, bass viol, manager; W. 
B.Harper, cornet; J. H. Putnam, flute; C. H. 
Higgins, baritone; W. C. Brown, drum. 

— The new floor in the drill hall has done much 
to increase the confusion of sounds in the room 
during military exercises. The clatter of the rifle 
butts on the cement was objectionable but now 
when a company comes to "-order arms" there is a 
rumble not unlike a discharge of artillery. Calm 
indeed must be the mind that can continue to think 
unperturbed during the Babel of drill hour. 



— Town Meeting Friday night. All must be 
there. 

— Rifles and accoutrements must not be left in 
the hallways. 

• — The Ninety-Six Index board has been elected 
and has organized as follows : F. L. Clapp, editor- 
in-chief ; P. A. Leamy, business manager ; E. W. 
Poole, artist; R. L. Hayward, H. C. Burrington, 
W. L. Pentecost, H. H. Roper. 

— Prof, and Mrs. Cooley were serenaded at the 
farm house the evening of Oct. 18. About a hun- 
dred students, headed by the brass band, united in 
paying their respects to the Professor and his wife, 
and all agree that the occasion was a success. 

— Among the new books which have been placed 
in the library ''A Narrative of the Peninsular Cam- 
paign" is worthy of especial mention. The de- 
scriptions of battles and sieges which the book con- 
tains are very interesting to the student of history 
while the illustrations are especially fine. 

— Twenty-four rounds of blank cartridges were 
flred by the artillery detail at their last drill, and 
the huge volume of smoke that rolled over the 
parade ground doubtless did much to arouse the 
spirit of patriotism in the hearts of the Freshmen 
who were experiencing the pleasures of squad drill. 

— The chess club has been organized with fifteen 
members. The following officers have been elected : 
president, I. C. Greene ; vice-president, S. F. How- 
ard ; secretary, J. E. Greene ; treasurer, C. M. 
Dickinfon ; directors, T. F. Keith, H. B. Read, F. 
B. Shaw, J. A. Emrich. 

— The Freshmen are making brave attempts to 
play foot-ball this fall, and in spite of their mis- 
fortunes they still persevere in their endeavor to up- 
hold the honor of M. A. C. among the smaller in- 
stitutions of learning in this part of the state. They 
have been partially successful but we think a little 
more determination on the part of the class to work 
and win would bring better result in the future. 



There will be no Exeter-Andover foot-ball game 
this fall. Andover thus far has made the better 
record. 



The lover is addicted to idolizing, the poet to 
idylizing, the tramp to idlerizing. 



44 



AGGIE LIFE. 



M. A. C. TOWN WARRANT. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
To the Constable of the Town of M. A. C. in the county 

of Hampshire : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of said town, qualified to vote in elections and town 
aft'airs, to meet at Armory Hall, in said M. A. C, on Fri- 
day next the third day of November, at seven o'clock in 
the evening, then and there to act on the following 
articles ; 

Art. 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting- 

Art. 2. To act on the list of jurors reported by the 
selectmen. 

Art. 3. To raise and appropriate money for the neces- 
sary expenses of the town, and for the care and support 
of the Free Public Library. 

Art. 4. To see what the town will do with the money 
received from the comity, known as the dog tax. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for electric lights in North College. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will grant permission to G. 
A. Billings, H. C. Burrington and others to construct an 
electric railway between Amherst and Northampton and 
also from Amherst to Nortn Amherst via the Agricultural 
College. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will purchase new uniforms 
for the Owl Club, and appropriate money for the same. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money to pay F. L. Warren for injuries received in a 
foot-ball game while playing on the college team. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the construction of a sidewalk be- 
tween the Agricultural College and North Amherst, agree- 
able to the petition of certain members of the Junior 
class. 

Art. 10. To transact any other business that may 
properly come before the meeting. 

The meeting must remain open at least one hour, and 
may be closed then or at such other later time at or before 
sunrise as the meeting shall vote. And you are directed 
to serve this warrant by posting up attested copies there- 
of on the bulletin board, and by publishing the same in 
Aggte Life, a newspaper printed in said town, said post, 
ing to be five days, at least, before the time of holding 
said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this warrant 
with your doings therein, to the town clerk, at the time 
and place of meeting as aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this twenty-seventh day of 
October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hun- 
dred and ninety-three. 

A. S. Kinney, ■) Selectmen 
S. F. Howard, V of 
C. B. Lane. j M. A. C. 

C. A. King, Constable of M. A. C. 



AMHERST COLLEGE LECTURE COURSE. 

The following is the program of entertainments : 
Oct. 28, New York Philharmonic Club. 
Nov. 13, Campanini-Morgan Concert Co. 
Nov. 27, The Blumenberg Concert Co. 
Dec. 4, Mr. F. Hopkinson Smith. 
Jan. 19, Edward Everett Hale. 
Feb. 2, George W. Cable, Eugene Field. 
Mar. 3. Hamilton W. Mabie. 
Mar. 9, The New York Male Quartet. 

The entertainments this year are of exceptional 
excellence and are well worthy of the support which 
they will receive from the colleges and townspeople. 
No student should fail to attend. 



Alu 



mm. 



WESTERN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

The second meeting and banquet of the Western 
Alumni Association of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College was held at the Wellington Hotel at 
Chicago, on Friday evening, Oct. 20, 1893. 

The following sixteen persons were present: Maj. 
H. E. Alvord, ex-professor; E. W. Lyman, '71 ; C. 
0. Flagg and W. R. Peabody, 72 ; W. P. Brooks, 
'75; H. E. Stockbndge and J. H. Washburu, '78; 
J. L. Hills, '81 ; C. S. Plumb, A. F. Shiverick, L. 
R. Taft, A. H. Taylor and J. Vu. Wilder, '82, and 
R. O. Cochran, ex-'82 ; W. H. Caldwell, '87, and 
W. C. Paige, '91. 

The retiring ofBeers, H. E. Stockbridge, Presi- 
dent, and L. R. Taft, secretary-treasurer, were re- 
placed by the election of the fullowiug : President, 
J. E. Wilder ; vice-president, C. S. Plumb ; secre- 
tary-treasurer, A. F. Shiverick. 

The occasion was a most enjoyable one to all 
present. The menu was elaliorate and well served. 
The table was decorated with two large vases 
of beautiful pink roses, and a boutonniere was at 
each plate. Tbe college colors extended from cor- 
ner to corner of the table, and after the banquet 
these were cut up and distributed among those 
present. 

After partaking of the supper, the toast-master, 
J. E. Wilder, proposed the election of officers, after 
which followed the toasts. Professor Brooks 
greatly interested us all by his report concerning 
the college and its growth. Toasts were responded 



AGGIE LIFE. 



45 



to by Maj. Alvord, and Messrs. Lyman, Washburn, 
Stockbridge and Hills. 

The festive board was not passed by without 
songs, and many reminiscences of college days. 
The entire occasion was one long to be remembered 
by those present. 

It is an interesting fact to note in connection 
with this banquet, that the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College is the only institution of its class that, 
so far as I can learn, has graduates sufficiently en- 
thusiastic to establish and maintain alumni associa- 
tions far away from the college. It is especially 
noteworthy that a little band of loj al alumni should 
gather together in honor of their Alma Mater in a 
city nearly one thousand miles away. Such patriot- 
ism exists in but few institutions having so limited a 
number of graduates. For ten years or more the 
writer has mingled among college men in the East 
and West, and nowhere has he found more devoted 
sons to their Alma Mater than those of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. 

C. S. Plumb, '82. 



'71. — Mr. Andrew Bassett, Pier 36, East River, 
New York City, has presented the college with a 
collection of minerals from the countries of Syria 
and Turkey. 

'75.— J. ¥. Winchester, D. V. S., of Haverhill, 
Mass, delivered an address at the Congress of Vet- 
erinarians held at Chicago last week. 

'78.— F. H. Osgood, M. R. C. V. S., Professor 
and Surgeon at the Harvard Veterinary School, read 
a paper before the meeting of veterinary suigeons 
recently held at Chicago. 

'86.— The address of C. F. W. Felt, resident En- 
gineer of the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway, 
is L. B. 232, Galveston, Texas. 

'88.— Born, Oct. 12, a son to Mr. and Mrs. E. H. 
Dickinson at North Amherst. 

'92. — Francis G. Stockbridge has returned to his 
home at Northfield, Mass. Since his graduation he 
has been employed at Fargo, No. Dakota. 

'94. — Louis Goessmann, ex. '94, assistant at the 
state experiment station, has returned from a trip 
to the World's Fair. 

'93. — E. H. Lehnert's address is 6 Union avenue, 
Montreal, Canada. 

'95. — R. W. Drury, ex-'95, is playing end on the 
West Point foot-balJ eleven. 



E^cKar\;^e. 



Among our latest exchanges are the Speculum, of 
the Michigan Agricultural College, the Amherst Stu- 
dent, the University Cynic from Vermont, and the 
Earlhamite. 

The Cadet of Maine State College again comes to 
our table, well edited, and abounding in poetical 
gleanings. 

The Mt. Holyoke of this month is especially fine. 
Under the Kodak department are found several 
gems of poetry, one of which we must quote ; 

Summer has gone and what has she brought us? 

Bu'ds, bees and flowers, 

Gay dashing showers. 
And many's the lesson of beauty she's taught us. 

Snmraer has gone and what has she taken? 

Soft moonlights tender. 

Bright starlights splendor. 
All have gone with her and left us forsaken. 

Summer has gone and what has she left us? 

A memory, a longing. 

And many thoughts thronging 
Toward the days that are past of which she's bereft us. 

An article in this week's Willistonian urges the 
students to more systematic and enthusiatic cheering 
and points to the enthusiasm shown by Aggie when 
at Flasthampton, as an example of what course 
should be followed to help the teams on to victory. 

The following clipping from the Phreno-Gosmian 
is very good. 

There are moments in hf e that are never forgot, 
Which brighten and brighten as time steals away ; 
They give a new charm to the happiest lot, 
And they shine on the gloom of the loneliest day. 
These moments are hallowed by smiles and by tears. 
The first look of love and the last parting given. 

Leiand Stanford University has no mercy on low 
practical jokers. Lower classmen defaced some 
private buildings with red paint, and now there is a 
reward of $100 for the guilty parties. 

The State University of Nebraska has an enroll- 
ment of 1500 students this fall. 

The Harvard University foot-ball team held its 
first secret practice last Friday. 



46 



AGGIE LIFE. 



NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY. 
A very successful meeting of the Natural History 
Society was held in the military recitation room last 
Wednesday evening. Pres. I. C. Greene gave a 
very interesting and instructive lecture on astron- 
omy, illustrating his statements by diagra,ms. He 
paid particular attention to the constellations, giv- 
ing the names of the important ones which are now 
visible, and pointing out their position. His lec- 
ture demonstrated that, contrary to the supposition 
of many, the science of astrono'^y can be studied 
to considerable advantage without the expensive 
equipment of an observatory. Arrangements are 
being made to have a series of lectures on the sub- 
ject during the remainder of the term. Lectures 
on other subjects of scientific interest will be given 
by members of the faculty. The society requests 
the support of all students who are interested in sci- 
entific inquiry. 



The Caterer C H AS E The Caterer 



Was never so well fixed for the business 
as now. Large and small Spreads at low 
prices. 



LORENZO CHASE. 

AMHKRST HOUSE. 



OLIVER D. HUNT, 

DEALER m 



^[ 






ALSO FIRE INSURANCE AGENT. 

;^-0hder8 received at HnNT's Stove Store..:®* 



H2 SCHOOL ST., BOSTON, 

Designed and engraved the title page of tliis book, 
you liave seen his worli in the college publications 
of Bates, Beloit, Bowdoin, Colby, Mass. Agr'l Col- 
lege, Tufts, Wellesley and Yale. 
jt9~He will submit you rough sketches and samplea free. 



^^Culver's Domestic Bakery^^ 

You will find the largest and best selected stock of Candy 
in town. Call and see for yourself. The price will please 
you. 

5 PHCENIX ROW, AMHERST. 



M. N. SPEAR. 



WALL PAPERS AND BORDERS. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



8L 



M. G. GOODl^V'IN, 

DEALER IN 

NEW AND SECOND-HAND BICYCLES. 
13 Phoenix Row, . . - . Amherst, Mass. 

LIVERY STABLE. 

SINGLE TEAMS TO LET AT FAIR PRICES. 
Pleasant St., Amherst. 



Yes this is our space. Don't waste your time read- 
ing our ads, you know that we are 



" Lamps and Lamp Goods are Ouii" 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Schillare's 
Photographic Studio. 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 



PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



108 MAIN STBMMT, 



NORTBAMFION, MASS. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



47 



FOUMTAIM PENS. 

SEYMOUR, WIRT, SWANS and the UNIVERSITY 

FOUNTAIN PEN which Is selling for only $1.50. 

All pens warranted to work WELL or 

money refunded. 

COLORED INKS, COLORED PENCILS, PAINTS. 



BOTANY OUTFITS 



A.I' :BOi"ro 



I^JE2IOE>{S. 



GUM PAPER, LENSES, HERBARIUM SLIPS, 
BOTANY PRESSES, &c. 



NOTE BOOKS OF ALL KINDS AND SIZES, PAPER, 
WHITE GLOVES, ATHLETIC GOODS, &c. 



Honest Goods. 



|^°Prices Low. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



M. A. C, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY. FEEDS SALE STABLE, 



T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS, DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

A.MBEBST, UTASS. 



DEALER IN 



5 -^AiWAIi^Pj 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

FIHE STl.TiaMERY. 
REPAIRING NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



a 0. PE 



H 




A.3VtI3:EE.ST, 



.Jflj 



Iwdl-A-SS. 




SWIFT DOUBLE ACTION IlEVOLVER. 

5-shot 38 calibre using 38 S 
and W. C. F. cartridges. 

Tlie Bearaty, Material and 
Workmansliip Ueequalled. 

The most improved double abtion revolver In the market. 
PRICE */0, BY MAIL, POSTPAID. 

Tlie Boston Bull Dog Revolver, |3.2,5. 

The Champion Shot Gun only $12.00. 

1 OR SALE BY 

Box 386, AivraERST, Mass. 

All correspondeuce will receive prompt atteution. 

COLLEGE AGENT FOR 

TALE FOUI^TAIIT PEN. 



STUDENTS' SUPPLIES. 

NOTE BOOKS, FOUNTAIN PENS, GUM PAPER, 
WHITE GLOVES, COLLEGE BUTTONS, 
COLLEGE PAPER, A No. 1 CON- 
FECTIONERY, LUNCH 
COOKIES, ETC. 



13 SOUTH COLL-EIOE 



AMHERST COLLEGE 






and Carpet Renovaliog [stalilisliment. 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Get Sample Rates for Washing and Mending. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

Thursday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE ; 

AMHERST HOUSE ANNEX. 



48 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes I Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



Slieet M^iasic, 



JVInsic Books, 



Strings 

FOR "the: violin, banjo, guitar, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 

jlMjaERST AND NORTHAMPTON. 



.^:b^i3:E:e,ST ieiotjse 

Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEU F 

AMHERST, MASS. 



..(.DENTISTS.^... 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
E. N. BROW:f^, D. D. S. 

CTTTZEIt'S BLOCK, AMBEMST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
e -A.. ]VC. TO 5 F. IS/C. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



E. Pv. BENNETT, 



Jeweler, Optician, latctaaker. 



FINE GOODS. LOW PRICES. 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED! 

First Door from Post-ofHce. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CHOICE CONFECTIONERY, BEST ICE CREAM AND 

SODA WATER, VIOLIN, GUITAR AND 

BANJO STRINGS, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO and SMOKERS' SUPPLIES. 

PRMSCJtIFTIONS A SPECIALTY AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your CO^S here. 



WILL FIND STUDENT HEADQUARTERS FOB 

FURNISHING GOODS 

AT 

BLODGETT & CLARK'S, 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK. 



For Suits and Fall Dvercaats 

CALL AT OUR STORE NEXT TO THE BANK. 



FINE ITAL m FAIENCE LAMPS 



B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, §1.00 UP. VERY HAND- 
SOME DUPLEX, $1.50, «2.00 and $2.50. 
For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Biscuit go to 

O. 6. COUCM & SON'S. 
FRANK O. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 

Joseph Parisbaf, 

KAZR DRESSING ROOMS. 

RAZORS HONED. 

Amherst House Annex, Amherst, Mass. 



OFFICE OF 



E. A. THOMAS & CO., 

Fire and Life Insurance Agents. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cook's Block, Amherst, Mass, 



H 



rr^ 



H 



T ftRTIKLEg 



A FINE LINE OF 



SMOKING TOBACCO, PIPES, &c., 
CIGARS AND CIGARETTES. 



D 



R 



J 



Amherst Hoose BlocL 



ORE, 

Anilierst, Mass, 



HENRY ^DA.MS, 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHEEST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, EISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at residence, first door west 
of Wood's Hotel. 



1850. 



■GO TO- 



1893. 



LOVELL'S PHOTOGRAPHIC SIUOIO 

FOR THE BEST WORK. 

Society, Glass and Gpoup (Qork a Specialty. 

LANTERN SLIDES MADE TO ORDER. 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE CENTURY PLANT FOR 
SALE. 



^. 8. DI(?HlC^gO^, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 
WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



|@=-Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.rr TKB 



AMHERST GASH SHQE STBRE 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



JAMES E. STINSOK, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



A. GLYNN, 



/ 



4 TA I LQ R. )^ 



Repairi7ig Neatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 



CHEVRONS, 

SHOULDER-STRAPS, 

SWORD-BELTS, 



MILITARY SUITS 

AND A FULL LINE OF TRIMMINGS. 



THE 

flibassacbusetts 

Hgricultural 

College 

1. A TISTO "STEARS' COURSE iu Agriculture and kindred 
sciences. 

2. £k FOUR ITEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. Eleven courses of study are provided Senior year, nine 
of which are elective. Those who elect Agriculture, Botany, Chemistry, Ento- 
mology or Mathematics have the advantage of perfecting themselves jn the 
higher branches of these sciences. Those who elect Veterinary, Electricity, 
Political Science or German lay a thorough foundation for further study. 
English and Military Science are required. 

3. A POST eiRADUATE COURSE of two years lead- 
ing to the degree of Master of Science. Residence at the college not 
required. 

Necessary expenses very reasonable. For further information apply to the 
President. 




h. 




•MASS. 

Jiov. 15, 1893. 



VOL. IV. 



NO. H,. 




Carpal 



orf housf . 



^RR'INJTERS, 



^ 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



The Caterer C H AS E Tfie Caterer 



IFas never so well Jixed for tlic b7tsiness 
as now. Large and small Spreads at lozv